Russia engaged in cyber war with neighboring countries

Russia engaged in cyber war with neighboring countries

Summary: This January marked "the third successful cyberattack against a country" -- when suspected Russian attackers distributed a denial of service attack that overwhelmed three of the four Internet service providers in Kyrgystan, disrupting Internet access, reports DefenseTech.The culprit?

SHARE:
TOPICS: Security
7

This January marked "the third successful cyberattack against a country" -- when suspected Russian attackers distributed a denial of service attack that overwhelmed three of the four Internet service providers in Kyrgystan, disrupting Internet access, reports DefenseTech.

The culprit? The IP traffic was traced back to Russian-based servers known for harboring cybercrime, and some are blaming the cyberattack on the Russian cyber militia and/or the Russian Business Network, which is thought to control the world's largest botnet with between 150 and 180 million nodes.

"Reports go on to say that Russian Officials hired the technically capable group to do this. It is widely believed that this group also played a substantial role in the Estonia Attack in 2007 and the attack on Georgia in 2008. The mechanism of attack was a fairly large botnet with nodes distributed in countries around the world...One significant difference in the Kyrgyzstan attack is that most of the DDoS traffic was generated in Russia."

According to DefenseTech, one source reports that this attack was commercial, "insinuating the civilian organization (attackers) may have been paid to carry this out" and helping the Russian government stay "an arm's length away" from the act.

Are geopolitical disputes now fought with cyber weapons instead of conventional arms?

Cyber Intelligence Analysts stated that attacks were launched to disrupt demands that leaders halt plans to prohibit access to an airbase for the US military in its war in Afghanistan. The analysts went on to say the Russian officials want nothing more than the base closed as soon as possible. (This is said to be one of the terms of a $2 billion investment deal that Russia is trying to negotiate with Kyrgyzstan.)

Not that Canada plans to get cybercrazy against the U.S., but it begs the question -- with the threat of cybercrime looming, does distance even matter any more? Is the U.S. no more safe from cybercrime from San Juan as it is from Siberia?

Topic: Security

Andrew Nusca

About Andrew Nusca

Andrew Nusca is a former writer-editor for ZDNet and contributor to CNET. During his tenure, he was the editor of SmartPlanet, ZDNet's sister site about innovation.

Kick off your day with ZDNet's daily email newsletter. It's the freshest tech news and opinion, served hot. Get it.

Talkback

7 comments
Log in or register to join the discussion
  • Simple Solution

    CUT off Russia from the rest of the net. it will be a SIMPLE and EFFECTIVE to deal with that renegade country. I bet you anything that once all fo russia is whitout internet access. The Kamarade Koverment will shutdown it's malware spewing server.
    Mectron
    • Yeah, right

      Good luck with that!
      FrankleeMiDeer
  • RE: Russia engaged in cyber war with neighboring countries

    What an ignorant nonsense. Kyrgyzstan is Russian Federation's ally and they want to close USA's base for a long time already on their own.

    So there is no political sense for "cyber war", nor commercial the more so.
    DDERSSS
    • I'll bet...

      You write for Pravda, don't you?
      ejhonda
  • Good Point

    Physical distance between countries is not really a factor in a cyber-attack. They seem to be honing their attack methodology with the small countries surrounding it before taking on a larger foe.
    melekali
    • let's think ahead...

      I'm curious to see what this cyberattack is leading up to. Another Russian blitzkreig, ala South Ossetia? "Nationalization" of some regional asset? Simple punishment of a former Soviet Republic for some type of pro-Western behavior? Things like this happen for a reason, and you can bet that those in charge feel that the payoff is worth the cost and effort. Somehow I doubt this story is over.
      michael.tindall
      • and here is why:

        http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/29032319

        They browbeat them into closing an air base the US was using in the war in Afghanistan. It undoubtably cost next to nothing, with no real risk, and accomplished a strategic goal.

        "Cyberwar: the cheap and deniable alternative to actual fighting."
        michael.tindall