Seagate's 2TB Barracuda XT, world's first SATA 6Gbps HDD

Seagate's 2TB Barracuda XT, world's first SATA 6Gbps HDD

Summary: Seagate announced on Monday the "world's first" 2TB hard drive with full support for the third-generation SATA interface and moving data at 6Gbps, double the rate of previous controllers.

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TOPICS: Hardware, Storage
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Seagate announced on Monday the "world's first" 2TB hard drive with full support for the third-generation SATA interface and moving data at 6Gbps, double the rate of previous controllers.

The 3.5-inch Barracuda XT drive spins four 500GB platters at 7200RPM, and offers a 64MB cache.

Seagate says the Barracuda XT promises a sustained transfer rate of 140MBps (600MBps/4.8Gbps is possible), and a MTBF of 750,000 hours.

To take advance of the new 6Gbps throughput speed, the Barracuda XT needs to be installed in a computer with a 6Gbps SATA controller, which is available now.

CNET reports:

According to Marvell, a maker of hard drive controllers, the first SATA 6Gbps controller is now incorporated in high-end motherboards from Asus and Gigabyte, such as the Asus P7P55D Premium or the GA-P55-Extreme. There will soon also be expansion cards that add the new controller to existing computers.

However, the new drive is backward-compatible with previous versions of the SATA standard, including the SATA 1.5Gbps and SATA2 (3Gbps). This means you will be able to use it with your current computer at the speed of the current controller. Nonetheless, it's predicted that by the end of next year, the new SATA3 will be the mainstream standard that replaces the existing SATA2.

The Barracuda XT  arrives on store shelves this week for $299 and carries a five-year warranty.

Topics: Hardware, Storage

Andrew Nusca

About Andrew Nusca

Andrew Nusca is a former writer-editor for ZDNet and contributor to CNET. During his tenure, he was the editor of SmartPlanet, ZDNet's sister site about innovation.

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13 comments
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  • It is still a Seagete

    It is still a seagate, so it will fail very quickly.
    sncking
    • Right. And does Seagate really expect us to believe those MTBR figures?

      Right. And does Seagate really expect us to believe those MTBF figures? They really have to be kidding.

      Do the math: 750,000/8640 = ~87 years!! == King Sized lie.

      I'm lucky to have a Seagate drive last 3 years without kicking the bucket. Almost every one of my large 300 to 500GB Seagate drives has failed within two years.

      There's no way that these unreliable drives will make 87 years. Even if Seagate cheats and uses the fudge[1] of MTBF measured across multiple paralleled drives we users can't get those sorts of figures.


      [1] A 'tweaked' measurement which goes sort this way: if 87 drives run in parallel for a year then one will probably fail (total running time of all drives = 750,000 hours).

      Irritated_User
      • Totally correct every Seagte I've had failed

        At last people are speaking up about Seagate drives. Every Seagate drive I have ever used has failed. Mostly they are the "enterprise class" SCSI drives but the IDE/SATA are no better.
        stephen.montano
      • Yep, every Seagate dies in about 3 years

        I'm just now replacing my 3rd 1TB Seagate in 4 months. You can't tell me
        these things have even a tenth the life expectancy of what they claim.
        Yep the MTBF number is a joke. You'd be less likely to be disappointed
        by believing the tooth fairy is going to leave you bucks for a lost tooth.
        Those big disk farms have replacement schedules with those drives
        practically on a conveyor belts being replaced every single day. It's
        makes a joke of what the word 'mean' even means. If you know what I
        mean.
        jnoel1
        • My Seagates have lasted ten years

          Heat is the enemy of all electronics. Every 10 degree Celsius rise above room temperature cuts the MTBF in half. Without ventilation, anyone's disk drive will cook itself to death in less than a year.

          No matter whose disk drive I use (Seatgate, Hitachi, Maxtor, Western Digital, or Samsung), I always place a fan in front of them and blow outside air over them. the 80mm or 120mm fans work wonders. I have 80Gbyte Seagates from my first windows 98 machine that still work great.

          I don't put my diskdrives in the bays above the floppy drive; I suspend them below the floppies and put a fan in front of them mounted to the front of my enclosure. The early enclosures didn't have any hardware to do so, but a few steel pieces from my childrens' Erector Set worked wonders. Today's enclosures put the drive bays down there and there are holes in the front of the enclosure for a fan. Do it!
          LarryPTL
  • RE: Seagate's 2TB Barracuda XT, world's first SATA 6Gbps HDD

    Any word on the real world performance of SATA 6Gpbs vs.
    SAS drives?
    draymis
  • RE: Seagate's 2TB Barracuda XT, world's first SATA 6Gbps HDD

    How about smaller capacities? I think folks could use more speed than capacity. Your OS should be on a HD (not a partition) by itself. Yes, Vista is big but it does not need 2TB. :-)
    TrueDinosaur
  • RE: Seagate's 2TB Barracuda XT, world's first SATA 6Gbps HDD

    If Seagate drives are so unreliable, why would EMC and HP use them so extensively.... I have a data center full of seagate drives with very few failures
    brett.watkins
  • RE: Seagate's 2TB Barracuda XT, world's first SATA 6Gbps HDD

    Never had a problem with Seagates. $10 says your
    ventilation / system temps suck ass...
    fibreoptik
  • Never had a problem with Seagate drives

    They are better than Western Digital.

    http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/245312-32-seagate-
    western-digital-reliability
    fibreoptik
  • RE: Seagate's 2TB Barracuda XT, world's first SATA 6Gbps HDD

    You can and do have bad runs of all drives by all makers and at one time western had bad reputation but keeping drives cool may in fact be an issue I hadn't thought about enough. My drive bays feel warm but not hot to the touch the case is open which means the fan is not working as well as it might to suck air through but then heat is not building up inside the case at all.
    deowll
  • RE: Seagate's 2TB Barracuda XT, world's first SATA 6Gbps HDD

    it is a nice picture though...
    dshoaff
  • RE: Seagate's 2TB Barracuda XT, world's first SATA 6Gbps HDD

    A 7200 rpm HD can really work faster on 6Gbps data transfer than 3Gbps? (4.8 Gbps is possible, what that mean? a peak? is hard to believe 4.8Gbps sustained transfer, that mean that a standard user will not notice the difference if he/she is had a 3Gbps or 6 Gbps motherboard.
    Bedsides to heat issue just get a HD temperature monitor program (some are freeware and some came with motherboard utilities)
    edgarjluque