Watch: Google Android running on the iPhone 3G

Watch: Google Android running on the iPhone 3G

Summary: A tech editor has been documenting weeks of work to port the full Google Android operating system to the Apple iPhone 3G.

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If you've ever wanted to see the (im)perfect marriage of Apple and Google, here it is.

PCWorld's David Wang has been documenting weeks of work to port the full Google Android operating system to the Apple iPhone 3G.

It's been a slow and steady process, but he's finally making headway.

In a video, Wang shows that he can connect to Wi-Fi, browse the web and send and receive SMS texts, as well as run Android Market apps that don't require audio support.

Here's a look:

Wang says that once he knocks out the audio hurdle, he'll post binaries and instructions for warranty-breaking, intrepid coding-types to hack their iPhone into Android-y oblivion.

The point? Phones are more like computers than ever before -- and that paves the way for the mobile industry to follow the path of the desktop one.

Palm's webOS on the Nexus One, anyone?

[via Wired]

Topics: Mobility, Android, Google, Hardware, iPhone, Mobile OS, Smartphones

Andrew Nusca

About Andrew Nusca

Andrew Nusca is a former writer-editor for ZDNet and contributor to CNET. During his tenure, he was the editor of SmartPlanet, ZDNet's sister site about innovation.

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3 comments
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  • RE: Seriously ... what's the point???

    With the cost of all the time and effort he spent doing the experiment, he could had just purchase an Android phone and save money.

    Same for anybody wanting to play with his binaries. Between the cost of the iPhone and all the work needed to get Android installed and running ..... what would be the point?? Bragging rights??
    wackoae
    • Because they can.

      @wackoae
      People
    • Best of breed

      @wackoae: I'm sure this process won't be for the faint-of-heart, so no doubt there will be some people who do it for bragging rights or "because they can."

      But I suspect there are some people who have wished they could have one phone's hardware running a different phone's OS. I have a couple of friends who always get stymied by wanting a particular mobile OS on a particular network and in a particular form factor. It's a more difficult combination to achieve than you might think.

      But mostly, geeks just like to play with their toys. :-)
      the.ksmm