Libe Goad

<p>Texas native Libe Goad resides in New York City and has spent the past decade covering technology and video games for publications including Blender, PC Magazine, Bust, Seventeen and Sync. <p> Libe is currently the Editor-in-Chief of AOL's award-winning Games.com group, covering the growing social and casual games industry. Previously, she reported on consumer technology news for PC Magazine and other Ziff Davis properties and was the Editor-at-Large for gaming enthusiast site HappyPuppy.com. In 1999, Goad founded the one of the first women-targeted gaming/technology websites, GameGal.com. <p> A semi-regular TV talking head on CNBC, Bloomberg News, ABC, CBS, NBC and others, Libe has been named one of the 50 Most Influential Games journalists by Next-Generation, and has served as a judge for Spike TV's VGA awards, the E3 Game Critics Awards, and Independent Games Festival Awards.

Latest Posts

Gamification coming to the 2011 Game Developers Conference

Gamification coming to the 2011 Game Developers Conference

In a sign that it’s becoming more of an issue for mainstream video game developers, the 2011 edition of the Game Developer’s Conference is setting aside a day to discuss the topic of gamification.Held in San Francisco each spring (with several offshoots in other cities during the year), GDC is expected to attract about 18,000 attendees from companies as diverse as Nintendo, Zynga, and Apple.

published January 27, 2011 by

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Gamification Summit 2011: Big themes from the inaugural event

Gamification Summit 2011: Big themes from the inaugural event

Last week, the first-ever Gamification Summit took place in San Francisco. Around 400 people showed up to the sold-out event and heard industry insiders talk about what’s bound to be one of the hottest topics in 2011-- using game-like elements to make everyday life and consumer experiences more compelling.

published January 24, 2011 by

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Nintendo 3DS: Game systems meet gamification

Nintendo 3DS: Game systems meet gamification

This morning, Nintendo announced that its new 3D handheld gaming system -- the Nintendo 3DS -- will cost $250 and will be available on March 27. While the main focus of this gaming system is to provide a three-dimensional portable video game experience that doesn’t require any glasses, it’s interesting to see that the House that Built Mario is flirting with an additional level of gamification with this new device, in the form of a built-in app called the Activity Log.

published January 19, 2011 by

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Television apps gamify with OnLive

Television apps gamify with OnLive

One of the more notable game developments from CES 2011 was the deal struck between cloud-based gaming service OnLive and budget TV maker Vizio (which we’ve previously mentioned here). The OnLive service is going to appear in future Vizio TVs as an app, literally building games into the set, no console required, and it’s potentially one of the most intriguing gamification plays of 2011.

published January 16, 2011 by

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Can FarmVille make dealing with the IRS more fun?

Can FarmVille make dealing with the IRS more fun?

No, the government hasn't decided to give away badges or other rewards for paying taxes, but that's the example gamification guru Gabe Zichermann uses to describe the whole concept of using game mechanics to make everyday life more fun (even dreadful things like dealing with the IRS) in a recent radio interview.

published January 5, 2011 by

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Open Feint tries to be the Groupon of mobile games

Open Feint tries to be the Groupon of mobile games

If you like to play games on an iPhone or other mobile device, you're more than aware at how difficult it is to search for and find great games or -- if you're making them -- getting them in front of people's eyeballs. Apple's new and bestsellers lists are the go-to resource for iPhone users and the Android store also has a list of newbies and top sellers, but outside of that, finding and/or promoting a game is generally an exercise in frustration.

published December 16, 2010 by

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James Patterson, Kobo e-reader turn books into games

James Patterson, Kobo e-reader turn books into games

A few days ago, I talked to best-selling author James Patterson about his new Facebook game, Catch a Killer. In addition to being a prolific writer (and having a small collection of games based on his work), Patterson also has a distinguished background in advertising (he was at various times the creative director, CEO, and Chairman of a division of the J.

published December 12, 2010 by

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Badges? We don't need no stinkin' badges

Badges? We don't need no stinkin' badges

Gamification. That's what describes what companies like Foursquare and Gowalla set out to do -- turn your everyday activities into a game, rewarding you with badges, points, or a higher spot on a leaderboard for doing banal things.

published December 5, 2010 by

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