Getty Museum gets Google Goggles-enabled

Getty Museum gets Google Goggles-enabled

Summary: The J. Paul Getty Museum in Los Angeles is now Google Goggles-enabled. Take a picture of any of the permanent paintings in their collection and open up a plethora of new information.

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TOPICS: Google
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The J. Paul Getty Museum in Los Angeles is now Google Goggles-enabled. In other words, using your Google Googles smartphone app to take a picture of any of the permanent paintings in their collection opens up a plethora of new information.

That snapped picture leads to web-based commentary from artists, curators, historians, and sometimes even the artist themselves, according to the official Google blog. In at least one case, you can hear an anthropomorphic pig. Google is promoting it as a way for museum curators to expand the story behind each painting beyond a tiny plaque on the wall.

Taking the art history lesson home is as simple as enabling Search History on your Google Android phone (Apple iPhone users seem to be out of luck). And if you come across one of the indexed paintings from the Getty collection in, say, a textbook, Google Goggles can still pop up all the relevant information.

Google Goggles is available as part of the free Android and iPhone Google Search apps.

Topic: Google

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    grantmacdonald
  • Message has been deleted.

    grantmacdonald
  • Google-Goggles?

    I thought Donnieboy was the only person that wore those. :)
    Will Pharaoh
  • RE: Getty Museum gets Google Goggles-enabled

    I love the concept of Google Goggle's as much as I love using the voice search on both my phone and computer.<br><br>Beware, though Google's intention may be honorable, Getty is most likely more interested in using Google Goggles to index all of their photos and items at the Getty, so the Getty can then turn around and track their usage by people unknowingly thinking the images might be 'royalty free'.<br><br>A friend I have that works at the Getty say they derive millions of dollars of their annual income demanding payment sending them a largely inflated invoice and threatening to sue unsuspecting for putting an image on their blog or website to tell a story (with or without disclosing source/link) even before requesting a 'cease and desist' as is the normal case in law. Many not knowing their rights pay the Getty extortioners without realizing they may exercise 'due process' and at least deserve a 'heads up' prior to being threatened and extorted with a demand for payment hundreds of times more than the actual 'fair market value' of the photo license.<br><br>Google is so large now and is growing into so many cool areas of technology that it is hard to keep up with.<br><br>However, in order to 'fight the good fight' in trying 'not to be evil', it must more closely scrutinize it's partners application and intent. Whether it be government, corporations or individuals.<br><br>Remember, 'with great power comes great responsibility'.<br>It would be far too easy for Google to be drawn into the dark side. All movie cliche' aside...<br><br>Gratefully, Google doesn't need the money, and can better afford to resist and stand up for what is right for the whole of humanity.<br><br>Hopefully, they will... for all of our sake.
    SocratesMentor