Gmail locks out users for an hour

Gmail locks out users for an hour

Summary: Today, Gmail went down for a "subset of users" (but from what I can tell it seems like it was everyone). When trying to log in, users were greeted with an uber descriptive error message "Temporary Error (502)".

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Today, Gmail went down for a "subset of users" (but from what I can tell it seems like it was everyone). When trying to log in, users were greeted with an uber descriptive error message "Temporary Error (502)". The outage lasted for an hour, and according to the support group, the problem has now been resolved.

The Gmail team is currently aware of a subset of users being affected by the 502 error on login. Our engineers are looking into the issue and we will provide updates here as they become available.

...

[1 hour later] Update - engineers have pinpointed the issue causing the 502 errors and it looks as if users should start to regain normal functioning of their account. Thanks for being patient while we worked to sort out this problem.

This type of thing is what I am referring to when I complain about Google's technical support. If this was truly limited to a "subset" of users, and it happened to be affecting the Google Apps account your business uses to provide email to employees, what good is a simple user group?

As a person who used to administer a Google Apps account with hundreds of users (but have since moved to MS Exchange), I can tell you that this type of thing does happen, and it's impossible to explain what's going on to users. This type of thing ultimately makes both end-users and administrators unhappy, and therefore it's an impossible model to sustain. The answer is a simple, provide real customer service. Here's how I propose Google deals with this important customer service problem.

Topics: Collaboration, Browser, Cloud, Enterprise Software, Google, Software

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6 comments
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  • Privacy and Confidentiality

    Using public email systems, you are exposing your emails to parties interested in! Time to plug off from public mail systems.
    joemartn
    • Duh!

      All email traverses multiple networks en route and is intrinsically susceptible to exposure to interested parties. If you think avoiding on-line mail services like gmail or Yahoo mail will protect you, you're mistaken. If you want security, you need to encrypt your emails. Period.
      ZDNET_guest666
  • RE: Gmail locks out users for an hour

    Garett said: "This type of thing is what I am referring to when I complain about Google???s technical support."

    Used to? USED TO? Seems to me, you never stop complaining and reporting negative about Google, Garett. Except, of course, when you used to gush uncontrollably about some great new offering from Google.

    You might want to try leaving your personal excitement or resentments out of your reporting.
    ZDNET_guest666
  • Welcome to Web 2.0

    You do get what you pay for.
    ThePrairiePrankster
  • Gmail not ready for business

    I've been testing google apps/hosted email with my personal domain's.

    I admit that they are great, better then my other options for non critical stuff.

    But I have yet to acheive the reliabiltiy I get with my exchange servers. I will not be moving my company's data to the G-Cloud, not yet anyways.
    brittonv
  • How much are you paying for the GMail service?

    If your complaint is that there is an interruption in a service that you are paying for (as with a Salesforce.com or nohold.com type service) that is one thing. If you are complaining about something that you are basically using for free (rather than paying for a leased line such as a T-something or OC-something, hardware and staff), I am not exactly sure what your issue is. Granted, they should be running this on a load-balanced system (if they are not already) with a change management policy that would at least provide the illusion that everything is operational, but this is effectively a free service (to the user).
    B.O.F.H.