David Gewirtz

David Gewirtz, Distinguished Lecturer at CBS Interactive, is an author, U.S. policy advisor, and computer scientist. He is featured in the History Channel special The President's Book of Secrets and is a member of the National Press Club.

Latest Posts

Arthur on why IT matters

Steve Fulling, CIO of Sento Corp wrote me to say he'd heard W. Brian Arthur, a Santa Fe Institute economist, speak last night on why IT matters.

June 21, 2005 by Phil Windley

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Can your IT shop compete?

Last week, I decided I wanted a new Moto Razr cell phone. I could have taken my purchasing card down to the Cingular store and gotten one that night, but I decided I'd play by the rules.

June 16, 2005 by Phil Windley

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Staying out of the news

It seems like every week now there's a story about another company losing control of digital identity data. The problem, of course, is that when your identity data is lost by some company, the chances that your identity will be stolen go up.

June 13, 2005 by Phil Windley

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InfoCard and Web Services

Over at the IT Garage, Doc Searls goes through some history of Microsoft's InfoCard initiative and asks some good questions.  InfoCard is an identity metasystem that Doc correctly describes as a "barn raising project" led by Microsoft.

June 6, 2005 by Phil Windley

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Tools for IT Transparency

Much of the mistrust that occurs between the business and IT sides of an organization is founded on misunderstanding and questions about resources.  Consequently, building a successful IT organization requires a culture of transparency.

June 2, 2005 by Phil Windley

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Does Your CEO Trust You?

The Bain & Co. "Management Tools and Trends 2005" survey asks some rather pointed questions of IT and business managers regarding the relationship between these two groups.

May 31, 2005 by Phil Windley

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The reality of Web services

Andrew McAfee, an associate professor in the technology and operations management unit at Harvard Business School, has been studying who uses Web services and why. More interesting, perhaps, are his insights into why using Web services remains hard.

May 23, 2005 by Phil Windley

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Long live COBOL?

Search390 reports the results of a Micro Focus survey on mainframes and COBOL.  According to the survey, COBOL is still the dominant language on mainframe computers and the median age of COBOL programmers is 45-59.

May 20, 2005 by Phil Windley

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