David Gewirtz

David Gewirtz, Distinguished Lecturer at CBS Interactive, is an author, U.S. policy advisor, and computer scientist. He is featured in the History Channel special The President's Book of Secrets and is a member of the National Press Club.

Latest Posts

As the Canopy Turns

As someone who'd been involved in Utah's high tech industry for a dozen years, I watched the founding and growth of Ray Noorda's Canopy Group with some interest and excitement. Before there were many VCs in Utah, Canopy was there, funding start-ups.

February 10, 2005 by Phil Windley

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Real-time augmented reality

Augmented reality systems essentially bring the special effects ofmovies into more practical uses. Maybe one of the simplest examples are thesystems that let you see what your house will look like with the paintscheme you've picked out.

February 7, 2005 by Phil Windley

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Mobiles beat handhelds because of connectivity

An article at TechTree reportsthat according to IDC's Worldwide Handheld QView, shipments ofhandheld devices fell nearly 20 percent year-over-year in thefourth quarter of 2004 to 2.8 million units.

February 3, 2005 by Phil Windley

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Dismantling the monoculture one piece at a time

Today, one of my students presented a paper in my graduate middleware class entitled Defense Enabling Using Advanced Middleware: An Example (PDF). The paper talks about various strategies for defending applications (rather than systems) from attack.

February 2, 2005 by Phil Windley

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Government IT projects <em>are</em> different

People are still talking about the recent news that the FBI's Virtual Case File system won't work after almost $170 million has been spent on it. A Wired News story has generalized the commentary to talk about government IT blunders.

January 30, 2005 by Phil Windley

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Customer integration points

Over the past five years, many CIOs have put significant effort intodeploying customer relationship management (CRM) systems. These systemsprovide a single view of the customer for the sales organization and givereal IT support to activities that were previously handled inspreadsheets, address books, and e-mail.

January 26, 2005 by Phil Windley

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