Latest spectrum auction could mean national wireless network

Latest spectrum auction could mean national wireless network

Summary: The FCC is set to vote on rules for a new spectrum auction that would require the winner to deliver wireless Internet across wide swaths of America, AP reports. "We're hoping there will be increased interest (in the proposal) and for the fact that this will provide wireless broadband services to more Americans is certainly something we want to see," said FCC spokesman Rob Kenny.

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The FCC is set to vote on rules for a new spectrum auction that would require the winner to deliver wireless Internet across wide swaths of America, AP reports.

"We're hoping there will be increased interest (in the proposal) and for the fact that this will provide wireless broadband services to more Americans is certainly something we want to see," said FCC spokesman Rob Kenny.

Under the rules being considered, the new wireless network would have to reach 50 percent of the population within four years and 95 percent after 10 years. The spectrum being auctioned is the 2155-2175MHz band.

The FCC rejected an offer two years ago from M2Z Networks to deliver wireless across the country in exchange for kicking back 5 percent of ad revenues from the network. The FCC rejected that deal because of open bidding requirements. It strikes me at this juncture that M2Z was thinking EarthLink-style muni networks ("we'll build it for free and sell advertising.") Just as EarthLink has seen the light on such deals with cities, I doubt M2Z would be so hot today on the same deal.

At any rate, here's hoping we can make some headway on getting national wireless service. It's amazing to me that all this spectrum has been sold off without any requirements to deliver national broadband.

Topics: Networking, Government, Government US, Wi-Fi

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  • uhh.. and what about the CENSORSHIP issue?

    The "family friendly" reference at the tail end of this article
    doesn't really highlight that Martin of the FCC proposed that the
    network only be allowed if it somehow "filters offensive content".
    And since there really is no technical way to do that - this
    amounts to censorship.. the same sort that everyone gets on
    China's case about.
    Htalk
  • I doubt it

    It is unlikely to have a cheap national broadband.
    That ship has left with the 700MHz auction.
    The new spectrum 2155-2175MHz has less wall penetration and is a lot more prone to interference from cordless phones and microwave ovens.
    Under optimal conditions the bandwith for that 20 MHz is 10 Mbs, in real life may be 2-3 Mbs.
    That means bye-bye streaming that needs about 20Mbs for decent standard NTSC video.
    Only the congress can allocate enough bandwith and impose a standard to operate in this spectrum.
    Linux Geek