Heather Clancy

Heather Clancy is an award-winning business journalist specializing in transformative technology and innovation. Her articles have appeared in Entrepreneur, Fortune Small Business, The International Herald Tribune and The New York Times. In a past corporate life, Heather was editor of Computer Reseller News. She started her journalism life as a business writer with United Press International in New York. She holds a B.A. in English literature from McGill University in Montreal, Quebec, and has a thing for Lewis Carroll.

Latest Posts

A matter of degree

A matter of degree

If you have any doubts that some folks are rushing to get in position to get rich off climate change and high energy prices, I gotta bridge I'll sell ya.Perhaps no finer proof of the gold rush around energy: a new university training program in "carbon management.

July 31, 2007 by in EU

"Car piece, electricity piece" & what will Nancy do?

"Car piece, electricity piece" & what will Nancy do?

House Speaker Nancy Peloci (D-CA) is facing some crucial decisons on proposed changes in American energy laws. Her hometown newspaper says the Speaker hasn't said what she'll do about either tougher mileage standards for cars, or about forcing renewable energy for generating more of the nation's electricity.

July 30, 2007 by in Tech Industry

Hard cheese for hard coal

Hard cheese for hard coal

They may stop mining hard coal in Germany. The energy source that literally fueled Germany's manufacturing in the 19th and 20th Centuries will no longer come from German mines in the Ruhr Valley.

July 29, 2007 by in Tech Industry

Ozone revisited

Ozone revisited

There's a detailed, delightful (if you're a chemist) explication of the recent ozone research over on the realclimate blog. It's helpful to follow the realclimate blog's explanation of the vast difference between ozone's behavior on the earth's surface, and in the stratosphere.

July 27, 2007 by in Tech Industry

Finding fault in Japan

Finding fault in Japan

The July 16th earthquake that hit Japan's Niigata prefecture has left the country shaken: sesimically, politically, economically. There are elections for the nation's upper house on July 29.

July 25, 2007 by in EU

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