HP bests Apple, Dell and other rivals in latest Greenpeace green tech guide

HP bests Apple, Dell and other rivals in latest Greenpeace green tech guide

Summary: Before you buy a new piece of computing or electronics equipment during the upcoming holiday or year-end IT budget blowout, you might want to consider what it will take to get rid of what you are buying three to five years down the road. Yep, Greenpeace is at it again, with the release of its latest Guide to Greener Electronics, which it releases a couple of times each year.

SHARE:

Before you buy a new piece of computing or electronics equipment during the upcoming holiday or year-end IT budget blowout, you might want to consider what it will take to get rid of what you are buying three to five years down the road. Yep, Greenpeace is at it again, with the release of its latest Guide to Greener Electronics, which it releases a couple of times each year. There were two things that struck me in particular about this latest edition:

  1. The two companies on top, Nokia and Sony Ericsson, remain the same, but their scores were exactly the same as earlier this year. Nokia, with a 7.5 rating, is closest to Greenpeace's ethereal score of 10.
  2. HP was a big climber in the latest report, jumping up to 4th place from an 8th place rating in the version published earlier this year. It benefitted greatly from a decision to eliminate polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and brominated flame retardants (BFRs) from many new products, as well as an updated commitment to cut up the use of beryllium and related compounds by July 2011.

Greenpeace's focus on these substances is related to the disposal implications associated with certain substances, which can leach into groundwater or the atmosphere. HP rose in the rankings not just because it has taken a stand on the materials I've mentioned, but because some of its rivals -- notably Toshiba, Dell, Lenovoa and Apple -- haven't been as quick to act.

Toshiba, in particular, got its hand smacked not only for missing its target date for bringing new PVC-free and BFR-free to market but for hiding that fact. Disclosure is a big deal for Greenpeace, apparently. Microsoft also got a penalty point for its failure to meet PVC and BFR elimination targets. Apple dropped to 9th place from 5th place, although it actually had the same score as in the May 2010 guide. Dell, which managed to increase its score slightly, was still in 10th place; it currently plans to eliminate PVC and BFRs by the end of 2011 from its computing products.

So, here's the thing: these ratings are always subjective and they are based on lots of different things. What I love about Greenpeace's take, though, is that it is bound to get attention. Which means something is bound to happen before the next edition is released early next. (There are usually three published each calendar year; this latest guide is No. 16.)

Topics: Hardware, Apple, Dell, Emerging Tech, Hewlett-Packard

Kick off your day with ZDNet's daily email newsletter. It's the freshest tech news and opinion, served hot. Get it.

Talkback

20 comments
Log in or register to join the discussion
  • words, not actions

    the greenpeace rating should be grounded on actions alone, not "plans", or some promising wording from a pr department. giving high scores for "plans" that many of the companies never even intend to fulfill is a very bad thing. just look at dell and hp, how they broke their promise of going pvc and bfr free last year. they didn't. back then they got better marks for their "promise", now they are not punished for breaking it, to the contrary they get high marks for another "promise" again. ridiculous.

    the methodology is flawed and another proof that greenpeace has lost all of their former credibility. they are just a money collecting, self-serving entity.
    banned from zdnet
    • You are truly an idiot

      @banned from zdnet
      [i]back then they got better marks for their "promise", now they are not punished for breaking it, to the contrary they get high marks for another "promise" again. ridiculous. [/i]

      There is only 1 thing ridiculous here and that is you. You are wrong, wrong, wrong.

      http://www.greenpeace.org/international/Global/international/publications/toxics/2010/version16/Ranking%20tables%20Oct%202010-Apple.pdf

      [i]Toshiba, Samsung, LGE, Dell and Lenovo continue to be [b]penalised[/b] in
      this latest version of the Guide for backtracking on their commitments
      to phase out vinyl plastic (PVC) and brominated flame retardants
      (BFRs). Toshiba is served with a further penalty point for misleading its
      customers and Greenpeace by not admitting that it would not meet its
      commitment. In addition, Microsoft is served with a penalty point for
      the first time for backtracking on its commitment to phase out PVC and
      BFRs by the end of 2010.[/i]

      So you are 100% wrong for saying companies are not being punished for breaking their promises.

      Idiot.
      NonZealot
      • Or is it....

        @NonZealot <br>I remember reading an article from the UK which brought this whole thing out. It pointed to the fact that GP would give almost as much credit to a promise than actual results. Do they take into account the actual volume of the stuff being produced per device? If so, we might see that Apple actually puts less pollution in the environment to produce the same functionality for the consumer. <br>"Microsoft is served with a penalty point for<br>the first time for backtracking on its commitment to phase out PVC and<br>BFRs by the end of 2010."<br>FOR THE FIRST TIME... and what credit did it get the year it MADE the commitment? How many commitments are being rewarded this year that will be flops later. The environment does not care much about commitments, it only sees what is actually done. Each business SHOULD BE RATED UNIQUELY ON ACTIONS.
        DaveMTL
  • RE: HP bests Apple, Dell and other rivals in latest Greenpeace green tech guide

    > you might want to consider what it will take to get rid of what you are buying three to five years down the road.

    How do I know what I'll be buying in three to five years? Oh, wait, maybe you mean that I buy something today and dispose of it in three to five years? That's easy: I take it to the nearest state of California consumer waste recycling facility. Greenpeace should stick to harassing the French.
    Vesicant
  • RE: HP bests Apple, Dell and other rivals in latest Greenpeace green tech guide

    I dont its just words, they will surely take actions too.

    http://www.imperiousseo.com
    Search Engine Optimization USA
  • This Greedpeace list is a total nonsence

    <b>They kept and keep ranking higher companies, which "announce" their "plans", not the actual success in cutting PVC-use and such.</b><br><br>For example, Apple does not produce cheap plastic junk and does not use PVC for quite some time now, and yet it is ranked low while HP which produces PVC-junk ranks higher because they have the promise to stop, as well as some new promise for beryllium.
    DDERSSS
    • It must be exhausting for you

      @denisrs
      You must be exhausted having to defend the little underdog Apple against all the big meanie organizations like Greenpeace that go out of their way to make Apple, the little cute cuddly underdog, look worse than much larger companies like HP and Motorola.

      PS If you actually bothered to read the article, you would see that HP has done much more than promise to stop and actually [b]has[/b] stopped using PVC in their new products. So please don't lie.
      NonZealot
      • I'm with denisrs on this one as he's told us time and time and

        time again that <font color="red"><b>nobody, but NOBODY, is better then Apple at anything!!!!</b></font>

        Heck, If Apple built a plane tommorow, I'd never fly a Boeing ever again. Steve Jobs puts Einstein, Edison, Tesla, ect to shame!! Those guys are phoneys!!

        Theres no way HP or Dell could be better then Apple at anything. ]:)
        John Zern
      • HP about "new" products, but Apple already has no "old" products

        @NonZealot: so the point still stays on: <b>HP still continues to produce PVC-junk (the nature does not care if it is in old models or new), and Apple not</b>. Yet HP is higher because of "promise".
        DDERSSS
      • @denisr: No, HP HAS changed their production

        It isn't a promise, all new products are PVC free.

        [i]Yet HP is higher because of "promise".[/i]

        And again, no. The ranking is made up of [b]many[/b] factors and while Apple might be (maybe) better than HP in 1 area, Apple is far, far, far worse in others. So HP is higher because their [b]overall[/b] behavior is better than Apple's.

        The alternative is that Greenpeace is "picking" on Apple. Greenpeace has decided that cute cuddly underdog Apple must be singled out and punished while gigantic corporations like HP should be given preferential treatment. Will you go on record as saying that Greenpeace is unfairly "picking" on Apple while giving preferential treatment to HP? If you [b]won't[/b] go on record as saying that, then your entire rant is destroyed.
        NonZealot
      • Never said that GP is "picking on" Apple

        @NonZealot: I used Apple as "example" (see my original post).

        However, the rules that they made up to compile the list automatically outcast Apple without specifically "misjudging" the company.

        The point is that the rules are joke (<b>whether this about Apple or not, determining "greenness" of a company with significant weight on "plans" and "promises" is a cheap PR profanation of the initial GP's ideas</b>).
        DDERSSS
      • Who said?

        <i>determining "greenness" of a company with significant weight on "plans" and "promises"</i><br><br>You made that up. The <b>truth</b> is that HP has made significant progress on <b>real</b> reduction of PVC and that is what they got credit for. That, combined with their excellent ratings in other areas, pushed them above Apple. Were HP only to have made promises while being terrible in all other areas, they would have ended up below Apple.<br><br><i>I used Apple as "example"</i><br><br>Don't lie, were Apple put in #1 and HP ranked above Sony, you wouldn't have cared in the least. Your rage at GP's ranking methodology is disingenuous.<br><br>BTW, if you read the Apple report, you will see that Apple scores very poorly in several areas including use of recycled materials, providing recycling options to Apple consumers, detailing a plan for getting rid of other nasty chemicals, waste management, etc. Read the report yourself. PVC is only 1 tiny thing that you seem to think should be the only thing that counts. Maybe you can come up the denisrs green report where Apple always shows up as #1 because your only criteria is that the product must have an Apple logo on it.
        NonZealot
      • @denisr: read the HP report

        First line:<br><i>HP climbs to 4th place from 8th with an increased score of 5.5 (up from 4.9), <b>as a result of its progress in bringing products that are free from PVC and BFRs onto the market</b></i><br><br>Nowhere in there does it say HP got credit for promising to get rid of PVC, they got credit for actually doing it. They can still improve and Apple is still "winning" in that category, but you are <b>lying</b> when you say that HP gets credit for promises. In fact, if you compare Apple's ranking and HP's ranking in the category of "Timeline for PVC & BFR phaseout", Apple gets "Good" and HP gets "Partially Bad". Likewise, compare them in the category of "PVC-free and/or BFR-free models", Apple gets "Good" and HP gets "Partially Good" and Apple even gets <b>double</b> points in that category. HP didn't get ahead of Apple because of promises or even because they are "winning" the PVC categories. The only reason HP was tied with Apple last year is because their PVC rankings brought them down. This year, they've improved their products (nothing to do with promises) and so their PVC rankings don't bring them down quite so much. HP doesn't have a single "Bad" category any more, Apple has 5. That is why, even though HP trails on PVC, they still beat Apple overall.<br><br>Read the report denisr before you freak out about something you are totally ignorant about. I get the feeling you base the "greeness" of Apple based solely on Apple's press releases. You shouldn't do that. Apple's press releases will focus only on what Apple does well while not mentioning all the things it does poorly. It leaves you with an impression that Apple is doing everything well which simply isn't the case.
        NonZealot
      • Apple accepts its old goods for recycling very easily

        @NonZealot: so there is no problem in that.

        And it is better with PVC and BFRs now than HP.

        Yet HP is ranked higher -- only because of the promises. This time and earlier GP systematically cites that Apple's score are lower because Apple did not announce its plans of this or that.

        That is how it came to this ridiculous situation where the company that actually pollutes the world less is placed lower than others who pollute more but "promise" to do better in everything in the future.

        So no, please do not lie about GP's methodology. They rank Apple low exactly because of it does not announce its plans, with other things being secondary from each year.
        DDERSSS
      • To those people reading denisrs' comments

        You can choose to believe his statements for which he offers absolutely no backup or you can choose to actually read GP's reports which specifically prove denisrs wrong. I'm done debating this with him because he is obviously too much of an Apple fanboy to be able to accept that Apple isn't the best in this one area. This thread is a perfect example of the Apple zealot thought process:
        1. Read headline where Apple isn't #1.
        2. Deny the headline without reading the article.
        3. When quotes are taken from article disproving what was stated in #2, repeat #2.
        4. When more quotes are taken from the actual source of the article disproving what was stated in #2, repeat #2.
        5. Repeat.
        NonZealot
      • Your quotes do not deny my point

        @NonZealot: so your theory about my answers does not stand.

        And, I never stated anything about Apple being best in everything. So you yourself made up the point that you feel the need to disprove.
        DDERSSS
  • RE: HP bests Apple, Dell and other rivals in latest Greenpeace green tech guide

    Exciting!............................NOT!
    james347
  • RE: HP bests Apple, Dell and other rivals in latest Greenpeace green tech guide

    Yeah, lets just keep bending to the will of the eco-fascists.
    I12BPhil
  • Yawn!

    ...
    cmosentine@...
  • Just read the above

    " It benefitted greatly FROM DECISION to eliminate polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and brominated flame retardants (BFRs) FROM MANY (how many?, more than 1?, most?, 50.01%?) new products, as well as an UPDATED commitment to cut up the use of beryllium and related compounds by July 2011." my emphasis added...
    Really? Does this actually mean they are doing anything significant? As for collecting and recycling their devices... can we be sure that any of the above (including Apple) actually assure that non of this stuff ends up in India or some similar place, tore apart by cheap labour unaware of they are doing to their health?
    DaveMTL