IBM, New York university team on energy management for schools

IBM, New York university team on energy management for schools

Summary: For the past 10 months, apparently, IBM has been working with the City University of New York (CUNY) on analytics software specifically focused on helping schools in the New York public school system better-manage their energy consumption. But, frankly, I don't see any reason why this technology couldn't be applied to other public school systems in the future, with some localization.

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TOPICS: IBM, CXO
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For the past 10 months, apparently, IBM has been working with the City University of New York (CUNY) on analytics software specifically focused on helping schools in the New York public school system better-manage their energy consumption. But, frankly, I don't see any reason why this technology couldn't be applied to other public school systems in the future, with some localization.

The project is a collaboration of IBM Research, IBM Global Business Services, and the CUNY Building Performance Lab. The software tracks and forecasts energy consumption, based on information about past performance as well as peak potential performance. The application couples historical building information with local weather data.

Said John Shea, CEO of the division of School Facilities for the New York City Department of Education:

"One of our goals at the Department of Education is to reduce energy use in our buildings and learn from it. The IBM/CUNY energy analytics tool would help us better manage our buildings and would help our teachers incorporate the information from the energy use in the building to supplement the Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics curriculum."

This sort of technology is critical because it would be silly to think that a city or town is going to build a new building from scratch, especially during the current budget crunch faced by state and local governments across the United States. The fact that this software could help cut energy consumption AND provide material for school curriculum is a double-plus.

Here are some related posts about schools and the issue of energy efficiency:

Topics: IBM, CXO

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3 comments
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  • No shivering of the timbers

    <ul>"frankly, I don?t see any reason why this technology couldn?t be applied to other public school systems in the future"</ul> If it can't, whatever IBMer proposed spending a bundle on this thing will walk the plank.
    Robert Hahn
    • RE: IBM, New York university team on energy management for schools

      @Robert Hahn
      They'll just bribe the school systems to make sure that it gets adopted. Don't worry.
      hoaxoner
  • RE: IBM, New York university team on energy management for schools

    Heather, this is interesting, and encouraging, news. There are nearly 133,000 elementary and secondary schools in the U.S., and only a fraction of those are new facilities designed with energy efficiency in mind. The majority are old buildings that are difficult to heat and cool efficiently, with no technologies in place that cut down on energy waste associated with lighting classrooms and powering computer labs. <br><br>The ability to track and forecast energy consumption, and analyze the changes in performance from month to month and year to year will give school facility management the insight to make more intelligent decisions about energy use. It will also serve as a data collection mechanism that will make it possible to establish benchmarks for energy consumption at schools and universities. This is key to giving the educational system a role in the U.S.'s larger plans for energy efficiency. <br><br>Similar projects are in the works for the multifamily industry, which represents almost 25 percent of the total energy use of households in the U.S. My company is working with the Georgia Institute of Technology to develop specific benchmarks using our database of energy consumption data. These benchmarks will let multifamily property owners measure and track energy use correctly, so they can be more effective at reducing their consumption. I'll be interested to see if IBM and CUNY can help other states roll out this type of energy efficiency initiative. <br><br>Michael Miller<br>CEO, American Utility Management<br>blog.aum-inc.com
    MMillerAUM