Inhale some of that good, clean country air...hah!

Inhale some of that good, clean country air...hah!

Summary: Many of the environmental issues involve systems so large, and complex and far-reaching, you can feel irrelevant. Really, how much can one person or even a small business do to change the U.

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Many of the environmental issues involve systems so large, and complex and far-reaching, you can feel irrelevant. Really, how much can one person or even a small business do to change the U.S. dependence on fossil fuels for transport and electricity? Chnage a few light bulbs, walk more. But every day in every way, you and I are consumers and we spend whatever money we have on services and products that have an environmental and energy cost. Nowhere is this more obvious than in the food we buy, prepare, consume.

So let's begin by immediatley laughing out of the room any idea of the good, wholesome, clean American countryside. Just as the steel mills and tanning factories of yor spewed out pollutants we are still cleaning up, today's rural factories are still spewing. And they are factory FARMS that produce much of the meat eaten by Americans. And would you believe? They've found a friend in the federal government. Of course, the Environmental Pollution Agency (EPA) is far more worried about the factory farms than your health. Here's the top line in the WashPo's piece today, "the Environmental Protection Agency wants to drop requirements that factory farms report their emissions of toxic gases, despite findings by the agency's scientists that the gases pose a health threat."

How big a deal are factory farms? Big in terms of output of all kinds. Big in terms of profit, and thus in political contributions. Here's a rant even I have to admire about factory farms and the stuff they put into our food supply, our rivers, our air.

And that clean country air? Fergeddaboutit. Here's one example. Not to pick on Iowa, neccesasarly, but here's another.

And before you inhale, here's the EPA's map of air pollution hot spots. Don't expect them to highlight the massive methane and hydrogen sulphide from all those pork factories in Indiana.

Topics: IT Employment, CXO, Enterprise Software, Health, Software

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4 comments
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  • you can't regulate something you subsidize

    it would be a waste of the tax dollars and political clouth.
    This pollution is not good for the health but is patriotic because it 'secures America food supply'.
    Linux Geek
  • Absolutely

    Let's go back to the days of horse manure and urine in the
    streets. It must have been healthier because it was, you
    know, natural.

    Give us all a freaking break. Please.
    frgough
  • Would the pollution be any better if...

    Everyone grew all their own food?

    I highly doubt it. I'd even go so far as to say it would get significantly worse, but much less controllable.
    Letophoro
  • RE: Inhale some of that good, clean country air...hah!

    Yup, growing food causes bad smells, ugly piles of stuff, and other unpleasantries. Fortunately, it still manages to feed everybody (who can afford to purchase it). I know at least one farm family who run what some would refer to as a factory farm. Yup it stinks around there when they muck out the sheds and barns, spreading the recycled feed onto the fields. Sure does smell bad. But they employ a lot of helpers, they produce hundreds of thousands of gallons of milk AND they do not abuse their cattle or their environment. They fire anyone who misuses the cows, who uses irresponsible practices in their job, or otherwise is an unsatisfactory employee due to disregard for the rules and regulations put in place for everyone's safety and welfare. Don't complain about farmers with your mouth full. The saddest thing I look at on a daily basis is the number of local family farms having been abandoned or chopped into housing projects, lost from the production chain and from the long legacy of agriculture upon which this state and this nation was founded and is sustained to date.
    n.kateus www.webspunenterprise.com
    Naomi Bigelow