New Energy Star TV spec will improve energy efficiency by 40%

New Energy Star TV spec will improve energy efficiency by 40%

Summary: You may want to think twice about buying that new television during some summer-ending Labor Day sales event over the long weekend. That's because the U.

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TOPICS: Mobility, Hardware
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You may want to think twice about buying that new television during some summer-ending Labor Day sales event over the long weekend. That's because the U.S Environmental Protection Agency has raised the bar on what it takes for TVs to earn the Energy Star label. Which means, in short, that any TV you buy this weekend won't live up to that rating.

New equipment meeting the more stringent requirements, which call for a 40 percent improvement in energy efficiency, won't be on store shelves until May 1, 2010, just before the official START of summer next year.

The EPA has worked up a number suggesting that if all TVs sold in the United States met the new spec, it would save about $2.5 billion per year in energy costs. The carbon footprint reduction would be the equivalent of taking 3 million cars off the road.

An estimated 19 million TVs with 40-inch-plus screens are expected to ship into the U.S. market in 2010.

Topics: Mobility, Hardware

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5 comments
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  • Economy going down the tubes...

    With all of the new TAXES increasing all over I hardly see people running out and buying new TV's...


    Christian_<><
  • Livin' in a Nanny State

    Why not just let market forces determine how much energy consumption is appropriate? If the advertising literature says I'll save $100 a year with the new set, I'll probably go for it. If the old set is brighter and has better color, then I'll buy that instead. But setting arbitrary consumption levels is silly. Consumers aren't stupid, and they'll act in their own best interests.
    Dorkyman
    • It's standards for a label, not a restriction


      Ironically, what's going on here with the EnergyStar program is the RIGHT way to avoid being a "nanny state".

      The standards are not required. They are simply an INFORMATIONAL label that can help consumers make their OWN decisions about what their priorities are without having to invest hours upon hours scouring the details of each unit and the overall market average on energy use.
      spark555
      • Until the Fed mandates it for all

        government procurements...
        and every institution that recieves even one Federal dollar...
        and...

        regardless of whether or not the price difference outweighs the projected lifetime eneregy savings..

        infomational ratings good
        steadily increasing the bar good
        mandates bad
        Johnny Vegas
        • Energy Star is a requirement for ...

          ... government purchases.
          ShadeTree