New LED bulbs for indoor, outdoor use

New LED bulbs for indoor, outdoor use

Summary: Two companies I've been watching in the LED technology space have come out with new products this week: one, a street lamp for roadway and outdoor area lighting, like you would see in your local community. The second is a prototype of a bulb intended to act as a replacement for the 60-watt incandescent products that we all think of when someone says the word, "lightbulb.

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TOPICS: Hardware
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Two companies I've been watching in the LED technology space have come out with new products this week: one, a street lamp for roadway and outdoor area lighting, like you would see in your local community. The second is a prototype of a bulb intended to act as a replacement for the 60-watt incandescent products that we all think of when someone says the word, "lightbulb." Both of the bulbs are based on technology from LED leader Cree, which is based in Durham, N.C.

Here is the rundown on each of these options.

The new Dialight StreetSense Series LED Street Light (pictured to the right) contains new performance optimization and thermal management technologies. The luminaire acts as a replacement for the HID fixtures that probably line the streets of your neighborhood. They can output up to 75 lumens per watt, while maintaining 70 percent of those lumens over the 60,000 hour anticipated lifespan of the bulb. Because I know this is a big deal to most of us, the fixtures can be dimmed and they contain a photocontroller, which means they can respond from dusk to dawn according to the lighting conditions.

The other LED bulb that is being talked about this week is one that has a much larger potential impact. It uses Cree's TrueWhite technology, which is a big deal because that has been one of the biggest complaints about 60-watt incandescent replacements, that they don't cast the sort of light that we have become used to expecting. The Energy Star-rated prototype that Cree is showing off right now is being described as a "no-compromise" replacement that is dimmable (we all love our mood lighting dimmers, don't we?) The photo at the left demonstrates the difference, or lack thereof. Can you tell the difference?

As far as specs go, Cree says the prototype delivers more than 800 lumens while consuming less than 10 watts. Says the company's vice president of technology, Rob Glass:

"This is the first standard LED A-lamp that combines high output with a very high efficiency, in a small form factor, without the additional cost and complexity of active cooling or other design compromises."

You will notice that I used the word "prototype," so I don't actually have information about when this bulb will be available. Right now, it has been submitted to third-party testing facility to confirm the claims Cree is making about light distribution, lumen maintenance (how bright the bulb stays over time) and performance. I'll be sure to update you when this product hits the market more broadly.

Topic: Hardware

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13 comments
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  • Looks nice but....

    Can't we get away fro thinking off red is "white". Why could they not color balance the thing to at least he 35K or 4K range? 2.7K?

    Any indication of price?
    Bruizer
  • RE: New LED bulbs for indoor, outdoor use

    It still have to evolve. I am using LED bulbs at various places in and around house wherever I need low lighting during night, but they are not that great and also at the same time the technology is not that far to give you an equivalent florescent light luminance.
    Ram U
  • RE: New LED bulbs for indoor, outdoor use

    Looking forward to seeing the CREE TrueWhite. 2700 works great for matching current home lighting and if the a-type works as well as the recessed lighting LR-6/CR-6, it will make it into a lot of homes.
    WholeBuffalo
  • CREE LEDs

    CREE makes some very bright LEDs. Part of the problem is adapting LEDs that use less than 5 volts DC to a fixture designed to provide 120v AC.

    Interesting to note that the street light is rated to last almost 7 years. I hope this is a more accurate estimate compared to the CFL lamps that do not seem to last as long as advertised.
    sboverie
  • RE: New LED bulbs for indoor, outdoor use

    I can't wait for decent LED lighting. I was an early adopter of CFL and regretted it. Expensive, very short lifespans and very slow to turn on in spite of claims otherwise. And of course the toxic-waste issue with the mercury. <br><br>The city where I live changed to dimmer energy saving bulbs a few years ago. I'm wondering now if they're LED since they seem much dimmer now days. Hard to see people at crosswalks in the dark and light that doesn't project out onto many roadways. Ideally I'd like to see a streetlight with a reasonable brightness level that turns itself off when there are no humans or cars in the area.
    SMparky
    • Short lifespan? There goes your entire post

      @SMparky Sorry dude, but saying that CFLs have a short lifespan shows that you have no clue of what you are talking about and are just making the story.

      I have 1st gen CFLs that are still working.
      wackoae
      • RE: New LED bulbs for indoor, outdoor use

        @wackoae No, jackass, he does know what he is talking about. Lots of testing labs are reporting this, and consumers are complaining like crazy. Even some CFL packaging has been changed to reflect the 'more-accurate' lifespan.

        Are you sure YOU know what you're talking?
        RushRocks
      • RE: New LED bulbs for indoor, outdoor use

        @wackoae I am experiencing ~20% failure rate of CFL's in my house with no out of the ordinary installations that could be blamed (i.e: heat in a recessed housing). ~95% lamps & open bathroom fixtures. Oddly enough, the oldest bulbs/technologies seem to be the ones lasting the longest. Perhaps that is when they were made in USA...
        nssdiver
      • RE: New LED bulbs for indoor, outdoor use

        The cheap no-name CFL bulbs that a lot of people buy don't last long. But the brand-name bulbs have a MUCH longer lifespan than the old incandescent bulbs did.

        I have a light fixture in my kitchen that went through bulbs at the rate of about 6 a year. I put all CFL bulbs in it, and they have been solid for over 2 years now.

        Buy brand names, stay away from the cheapies, and you will see that the CFLs have a much longer lifespan.
        Stoshie
  • RE: New LED bulbs for indoor, outdoor use

    Those L.E.D. bulbs designed for indoor use are expensive-$40.00 verses $10.00 for the florescent-spiral type. I'm on a limited/fixed budget, and I can't afford to get the "new" type!
    pattmann3872
    • Agree on the LED overprice .... but ...

      @pattmann3872 If you are paying $10 for a CFL you are getting scammed.<br><br>CFLs were about $7 each when they came out .... today you can get them for $1.
      wackoae
      • RE: New LED bulbs for indoor, outdoor use

        @wackoae Not without buying 10 of them...
        nssdiver
  • RE: New LED bulbs for indoor, outdoor use

    LED Bulbs do save lot of energy. However the price has to come down for the common man to be able to purchase them
    Pradeepkumar VD