Sun's bid to save the planet (or at least make data centers more efficient)

Sun's bid to save the planet (or at least make data centers more efficient)

Summary: Sun Microsystems is amping up its green tech marketing this week with a program aimed at helping companies reduce the energy consumption in their data centers. (Think BIG companies.

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Sun Microsystems is amping up its green tech marketing this week with a program aimed at helping companies reduce the energy consumption in their data centers. (Think BIG companies.)

Its program, called Eco Innovation, is outlined in detail on the Sun Web site. Basically it includes a set of new products and new services intend to help companies Assess, Optimize and Virtualize their way to better efficiency. Some of these services are rebrandings of previous offerings to tweak their focus. But the point is, the right material is there to go greener with Sun equipment.

Sun also is trumpeting the success of its own data center overhaul, which incorporate new sites in the United States, India and the United Kingdom. Over the past 90 days, the company reports it has done the following:

  • More than doubled its storage capacity while reducing the number of actual storage devices to 738 from 225
  • Cut its servers by around half to 1,240
  • Snagged almost $1 million in rebates and awards from Silicon Valley Power

So, how does Sun's activities rate compared to similar pushes that have been adopted by Hewlett-Packard and IBM?

I'll need to learn more about the individual services from all three of the big enterprise computing companies before I can make a qualified assessment (I need some briefings guys), but Sun gets props for having its eco-messaging right on the home page. Sure, sure, it's their launch week. They SHOULD have it there.

But as far as I'm concerned, green tech should get prominent space 24x7 right alongside all the other marketing speak on every tech company's home page. If I have to look to find the green message, perhaps there really isn't one to find. Put that in your pipe ...

Topics: Storage, Data Centers, Oracle

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4 comments
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  • Who wrote this!

    This was the longest advertisement I have read in a news section. If I wanted to see advertisements I would watch TV. Please if you say something is news...make it news that is worth reading. Just as an example:

    I work for Global CompuSearch LLC. I could have written
    As a leader in Computer Forensic investigations, Global CompuSearch has a proven and distinguished track record among the countries leading law firms. Whether your case involves business litigation, employment matters, E-Discovery, criminal matters or simple data recovery, we can help. We are a full service litigation support firm that can assist in all aspects of your case from requesting discovery to analysis and investigation of digital evidence to expert testimony to assistance with contrary verdicts such as appeals and/or sentencing. Our computer forensic examiners have the training and experience to solve your most complex problems involving digital evidence. Let Global CompuSearch be your first choice.

    So that is what you call a plug for your company...that is not news even though we are the best at what we do.
    Take a look for yourself at www.globalcompusearch.com
    padishar29
  • Where's the beef?

    Wow, Sun is pushing how green-ness of their computers. This
    is front page news, for sure. I guess if you can't beat your
    competition on price-performance or reliability, you can always
    make some vague references to eco-friendliness of your computers.

    As best as i can tell from the article, Sun ripped out a bunch of old obsolete computers and put in some new ones. Wonder if the new ones are Sun?

    Starting in September, every new Sun computer comes free with an Al Gore doll.
    CattleProd
  • You could just

    get rid of SPAM and data centers everywhere could be green tomorrow!
    dmennie
  • IBM still beats that

    In this article IBM announces plans to reduce their number of servers by almost 90% by moving almost 4000 Linux servers to 30 partially filled System z servers (that is the contemporary name for the mainframe). And IBM is not the only one consolidating Linux servers to the 'dead' mainframe platform. IBM looks to save $250 million a year from their consolidation plans.

    http://www.networkworld.com/community/node/17998
    sstyer1407