Joshua Greenbaum

Joshua Greenbaum has over 20 years of experience in the industry as a computer programmer, systems analyst, author, and consultant. In addition to his work from various bases in Silicon Valley, he spent three years in Europe tracking the enterprise software market as an analyst and correspondent for leading industry publications. Josh is an award-winning columnist and is widely quoted in the trade and business press. His opinions on enterprise software have annoyed enough vendors that he now checks under the hood of his PC every morning before he boots up. </p>

Latest Posts

SAP's Succession Plans: Making Things Safe for Business ByDesign?

SAP's Succession Plans: Making Things Safe for Business ByDesign?

SAP executed the beginning of a well-orchestrated and otherwise somewhat boring (and boring is good) management transition with the much-expected elevation of co-CEO Leo Apotheker to the more important title of heir-apparent. In the process, Henning Kagermann assumed the title of retiree-in-waiting, and all was good with the world.

published April 2, 2008 by

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Microsoft’s Platform as a Service Plans: Putting the Pieces Together

Microsoft’s Platform as a Service Plans: Putting the Pieces Together

Microsoft is getting into the platform as a service (PaaS) market, and doing so in a rather major, though stealthy way. It’s no secret that the company’s Software+Services strategy has a lot of PaaS capabilities, but putting together information from announcements and briefings at this week’s Dynamics Convergence conference, as well as a previous Office developer’s conference, reveals what looks like a very strong and impressive set of initiatives.

published March 14, 2008 by

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Microsoft Dynamics Revenues: Is More Really Less?

Microsoft Dynamics Revenues: Is More Really Less?

Back in the summer of 2006, Microsoft did something that I confess I became complacent about: The gang from Redmond stopped breaking out separate numbers for the Business Solutions group, which at the time was comprised of its flagship ERP products – Navision, Great Plains, and Axapta – plus the Solomon accounting package and a relatively new CRM product.The reasons for going silent were not clear, nor were they particularly suspicious.

published March 13, 2008 by

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Making Web 2.0 Safe for the Enterprise: TOS à la PBWiki

Making Web 2.0 Safe for the Enterprise: TOS à la PBWiki

Just in case you might be tempted to excuse Google for what some commentators just consider sloppy language (or over-reaching on my part) in its terms of service for its on-line apps, here's an example of how to do right by accepted corporate standards for security and privacy: the terms of service for PB Wiki, an on-line wiki provider that apparently takes seriously what Google and its lawyers (or whoever wrote those sloppy, loophole-full TOS) seems to not give a hoot about.

published March 5, 2008 by

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SAP Takes A Swing at Oracle

SAP Takes A Swing at Oracle

SAP has been hinting and mentioning and otherwise suggesting that it is taking away customers from Oracle's much vaunted Hyperion product line, and now it has issued a formal press release to that effect.

published February 26, 2008 by

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SAP and Microsoft: No Marriage Needed

SAP and Microsoft: No Marriage Needed

The Sunday New York Times started a little blogo-versy going about whether Microsoft should have made an offer to buy SAP instead of Yahoo. It's an interesting thought, if revisiting history is your idea of interesting.

published February 25, 2008 by

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IDS Scheer: Jazzing up BPM

IDS Scheer: Jazzing up BPM

I spent a quick but very interesting day at the annual user conference for IDS Scheer, the progenitors of the Aris BPM solution. In case you hadn’t heard of it, Aris holds the singular distinction of being included in the partner roadmaps of rivals SAP, Oracle, and Microsoft, all without hell freezing over or any other such cataclysmic event taking place.

published February 18, 2008 by

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Dark Clouds and Silver Linings

Dark Clouds and Silver Linings

Cloud computing is getting hot, as in hot promises, hot press releases, and some hot contentions about who’s platform is going to win the latest battleground in on-demand/SaaS. The answer my friend, is largely blowing in the wind.

published February 15, 2008 by

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How Microsoft/Yahoo Can Beat Google In the Enterprise

How Microsoft/Yahoo Can Beat Google In the Enterprise

It's simple: Microsoft should make its online apps conform to real world requirements for data security and integrity, instead of the Google-uber-alles terms of service that Google sets forth for its Google Apps users. Having just added some new work group features, you think that Google would have gotten these issues figured out already.

published February 7, 2008 by

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SAP Targets High-end Customers with SMB Offering

SAP Targets High-end Customers with SMB Offering

SAP's Business ByDesign has always suffered from a perception problem: SAP has said pretty much categorically that it will be only sold into the SMB market. This position has been stuck to steadfastly, despite lots of evidence that high-end customers would love to have some or all of BBD's functionality somewhere in their enterprise, either as an adjunct to the existing MySAP suite or as a stand alone system running in a subsidiary operation.

published February 1, 2008 by

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Salesforce.com As Economic Barometer

Salesforce.com As Economic Barometer

Marc Benioff's interview with the Wall Street Journal today has an interesting little tidbit about the value of his on-demand model, and what an astute investor could do with data about the usage of a service like Salesforce.com.

published January 24, 2008 by

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IBM Returns to the Desktop Interface Bandwagon, and Coopetition with SAP Abounds

IBM Returns to the Desktop Interface Bandwagon, and Coopetition with SAP Abounds

A little over a year ago, IBM tried one of its end runs around its partner SAP and announced a plan to provide Lotus Notes users with direct access to SAP’s R/3. While clearly intended to capitalize on phenomena like Duet – the Microsoft/SAP offering that makes Office a front-end to SAP’s Business Suite – Notes for SAP was also notable for the lack of cooperation between IBM and SAP on the deal.

published January 21, 2008 by

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