Can Microsoft lure you back to IE with a "Do Not Track" tool?

Can Microsoft lure you back to IE with a "Do Not Track" tool?

Summary: So, Microsoft has plans to add a "Do Not Track" feature to IE9 that would allow users to opt out from being tracked while surfing the web. Can Microsoft's new found interest in protecting user's privacy lure you away from your current browser and to Internet Explorer?

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TOPICS: Browser, Microsoft
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So, Microsoft has plans to add a "Do Not Track" feature to IE9 that would allow users to opt out from being tracked while surfing the web. Can Microsoft's new found interest in protecting user's privacy lure you away from your current browser and to Internet Explorer?

Note: The idea of a "Do Not Track" list was initially suggested by the FTC in its online privacy report.

The feature, which is akin to a "Do Not Call" list, allows users to create a customized list of companies that they don't want to be able to track their online activities. This new feature is called Tracking Protection and incorporates two features:

  1. IE9 will offer consumers a new opt-in mechanism (“Tracking Protection”) to identify and block many forms of undesired tracking.
  2. “Tracking Protection Lists” will enable consumers to control what third-party site content can track them when they’re online.

By default, the "Tracking Protection List" is empty. Users will be able to create their own "Do Not Track" lists, or download ones to suit their needs from the web. These lists will be in XML format and the format available under a Creative Commons Attribution license and the Microsoft Open Specification Promise.

Mozilla was working on a similar feature for Firefox 4, but this was dropped from the beta following concerns from advertisers who were worried that such a feature would harm revenues. Microsoft it seems isn't as bothered by pressure from advertisers.

[poll id="580"]

So, what do you think? Is this going to be enough to lure you to Internet Explorer, or does Microsoft have a long way to go before its browser beats Firefox/Chrome/Opera/Safari* (delete as appropriate)?

Topics: Browser, Microsoft

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76 comments
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  • RE: Can Microsoft lure you back to IE with a

    Yes please. I can't see it ever happening with Chrome though - I mean that's its purpose isn't it?

    ;-)
    tonymcs@...
    • Could also ...

      introduce No Ads, No Script and No Plugins option as well. Those things should all be default components rather than Add-ons.
      LBiege
      • RE: Can Microsoft lure you back to IE with a

        @LBiege That would be awesome. They should do it!
        statuskwo5
      • Who? IE?

        [i]introduce No Ads, No Script and No Plugins option as well. Those things should all be default components rather than Add-ons.[/i]

        Are you kidding? And sink some of their ad revenue?

        It'll never happen.

        lol... :D
        search & destroy
    • RE: Can Microsoft lure you back to IE with a

      @tonymcs@... Firefox has this, and spybot S&D has a huge block list that it can put on your machine to make sure that you cant be affected, send data to or receive things from the domains on that list. But blocking all ads is a bad thing, most of the internet lives on ad revenue. Blocking ads just makes you a jackass. If everyone blocks ads online, then pretty soon the internet will be a pay-to-surf place. Where you will have to subscribe to websites that you want to view.
      Jimster480
      • RE: Can Microsoft lure you back to IE with a

        @Jimster480
        And here I thought my $50 a month for a 32Mbit connection was paying to surf, so I should give some of my purchased bandwidth to view an advertisement which is making someone else money... Sounds like a scam to me.
        ryanstrassburg
      • RE: Can Microsoft lure you back to IE with a

        [i]But blocking all ads is a bad thing, most of the internet lives on ad revenue. Blocking ads just makes you a jackass.[/i]

        Really? So pissing me off with ads full of crap I don't wanna buy, is really gonna get me to buy it?

        lol... I think you need to get real, pal...

        [i]If everyone blocks ads online, then pretty soon the internet will be a pay-to-surf place. Where you will have to subscribe to websites that you want to view.[/i]

        Well good. We'll see how long that lasts.
        search & destroy
      • ryanstrassburg: Actually, you aren't paying for the content on a website,

        although you are paying for the connection that allows you to "surf" the internet.<br><br>A connection only allows you to "connect" to the sites on the internet, but, the content on those sites is not being paid for with your connection fees. So, we may end up with the content providers billing the ISPs for each connection to their site from the ISPs customers. In that case, the ISP might have to raise their prices for your broadband contract in order to pay the sites that you connected to. So, instead of $50 dollars, you might end up paying... perhaps $100?, $200?, perhaps even more. The billing procedures would become a nightmare for the ISPs and the content providers, and perhaps to you. Thus, we might have to allow and view, no matter how much we despise it, advertising on websites.
        adornoe
      • RE: Can Microsoft lure you back to IE with a

        [i]A connection only allows you to "connect" to the sites on the internet, but, the content on those sites is not being paid for with your connection fees. So, we may end up with the content providers billing the ISPs for each connection to their site from the ISPs customers. In that case, the ISP might have to raise their prices for your broadband contract in order to pay the sites that you connected to. So, instead of $50 dollars, you might end up paying... perhaps $100?, $200?, perhaps even more. The billing procedures would become a nightmare for the ISPs and the content providers, and perhaps to you. Thus, we might have to allow and view, not matter how much we despise it, advertising on websites.[/i]

        That has to be one of the dumbest things I've ever heard.
        search &amp; destroy
      • And this is different how from paying $50 bucks a month for cable TV...?

        @ryanstrassburg
        You get tons of advertisements crammed into every hour of programming - which results in about 42 mins of actual program and 18 odd minutes of spam... And yet, many pay for it gladly..
        Wolfie2K3
      • RE: Can Microsoft lure you back to IE with a

        @Jimster480

        "Blocking ads just makes you a jackass. If everyone blocks ads online, then pretty soon the internet will be a pay-to-surf place. Where you will have to subscribe to websites that you want to view. "

        Its not the fact there are ads that bothers me, but rather the type of ads. Back in the beginning, there were static ads. Then they needed to rotate. That was fine. Rotate away. But now they deliver dynamic ads through channels that are prone to exploits (mostly java, and some flash) and not to mention they want to dig into your personal life to find out how to "better" serve you ads. All this extra data traveling to and from these servers that dish out these custom tailored as eat up way more bandwidth, and are a large part of why we NEED 35Mbps connections these days.

        I understand companies needing to advertise, and I clearly understand websites needing advertisers, as I have run a website before myself. That said, I still see no reason an advertisment should ever need to place tracking cookies on someones machine. You can serve relevant ads according to the type of site they are browsing without keeping track of where they surf beyond the site the ad is on.

        I'm willing to bet the ad networks make way more money on selling the tracking information than they do on the ads themselves.
        ShadowGIATL
      • search &amp; destroy: Actually, the dumbest thing that anybody can do is to

        bash another person's statements (or post) and then not offer a real rebuttal to the points made.<br><br>What I said stands fully, and what you offered is nothing. <br><br>It is often said that, if you don't really have anything of value to contribute, then it's best to keep your mouth shut (or you should stay away from the keyboard).
        adornoe
  • As a Mac user...

    I'd like to see a function like that come to Safari. Well done Microsoft.
    A Grain of Salt
    • RE: Can Microsoft lure you back to IE with a

      @A Grain of Salt I agree!
      nicolebh
    • It will come to Safari

      @A Grain of Salt
      It will be called Spy Stopper and it will be hailed as an Apple invention.
      NonZealot
      • RE: Can Microsoft lure you back to IE with a

        @NonZealot - LOL one addition iSpyStopper (have to use the "i" for anything Apple.
        ItsTheBottomLine
      • RE: Can Microsoft lure you back to IE with a

        @NonZealot lol, good one !
        animageofmine1
      • RE: Can Microsoft lure you back to IE with a

        @NonZealot I can already see the headlines. Safari, now with iSpyStopper, the FIRST BROWSER to have ANTI-Advertising built in. Only on MAC!
        Jimster480
      • Yup

        [i]Safari, now with iSpyStopper, the FIRST BROWSER to have ANTI-Advertising built in. Only on MAC![/i]

        And only $99/year!!!
        NonZealot
      • While flagging you as spam...

        ...is free!

        lol... :D
        search &amp; destroy