GDDR 5 to come to graphics cards next year

GDDR 5 to come to graphics cards next year

Summary: Samsung has announced plans to mass produce GDDR 5 memory for graphics cards, which will be faster and more energy efficient that current memory.

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TOPICS: Hardware, Samsung
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Samsung has announced plans to mass produce GDDR 5 memory for graphics cards, which will be faster and more energy efficient that current memory.

GDDR 5 (Graphics Double Data Rate) will run on 1.5V and according to Samsung will be able to transfer data at speeds up to 6Gbps (bits per second), which is an improvement over the 3.2Gbps transfer rates offered by GDDR 4 and a massive gain compared to the puny 1.6Gbps transfer rate of GDDR 3.

Samsung plans to have mass production up to speed by mid-2008.

I wonder if this announcement has anything to do with the rumor that nVIDIA plans to launch a new G9 flagship product in February 2008.  GDDR 5 would certainly help give the company the upper hand against ATI.

Topics: Hardware, Samsung

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3 comments
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  • This is wonderful news for the public

    The price of GDDR 2 and 3 graphics cards are
    already next-to-nothing now, not to mention
    GDDR 4. Maybe they will start giving them
    away now.

    The more unsold merchandise that piles up on
    shelves, the lower the prices will be, while
    at the same time, this gives game-happy,
    bleeding-edge, well-heeled customers
    something new to blow their money on play
    with.

    Bring it on! When can we expect GDDR 6?
    Ole Man
    • When to expect GDDR 6.

      6 months after GDDR 5 lol.
      matt.nelson
  • Transfer speed can't be right

    There's something fishy with the numbers presented in this article. 1.6Gbps transfer rate? That's, like, 200MByte/s. I bet my long gone 486 could beat that. Looking this up on the all-knowing wikipedia confirms that a mistake may have been done here: The number he refers to as transfer rate should actually be the max number of data transfers per second. I guess you need to multiply this with the bus width or something, to get the actual transfer rate, but I can't get those numbers right. Anyway, ackording to the wikipedia, max transfer rates for DDR3 ram is 12800MB/s which feels much more right.
    funkymoz