HTC Nexus One/Google Phone ... more questions than answers

HTC Nexus One/Google Phone ... more questions than answers

Summary: I love watching how some tech stories unfold. It's especially interesting when there are just enough leaks to get people whipped up into a frenzy over a device that, ultimately, they know little about.

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TOPICS: HTC, CXO
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I love watching how some tech stories unfold. It's especially interesting when there are just enough leaks to get people whipped up into a frenzy over a device that, ultimately, they know little about.

Take the Nexus One, aka Google Phone. It's expected that it will go on sale on January 5th at 9am. That's unconfirmed. Then there are leaked details on the plan and pricing models. Again, unconfirmed (although the pricing info does make sense). We also have a leaked details regarding spec. Again, it's all rumor, speculation and guesses. As far as we know for sure, this thing could be built entirely of Unobtanium by unicorns using nothing but their horns for tools.

And yet people are whipped up.

The problem is that despite the torrent of leaks, we still know very little about the Nexus One, the pricing and plans, and also about Google's overall strategy. What's worked for Apple was to have a strategy that went beyond just releasing a series of phones, one after the other. How does this strategy fit in with the rest of the Android ecosystem? What about enterprise usage? Questions, questions, questions.

We'll know more come the official announcement, but even then I'm expecting that the thrust of that will be along the lines of "best thing ever" and "Buy. Buy! BUY!!!"

My advice with smartphones (and cellphones in general) is the same now as it was years ago - wait and see how things play out. When it comes to something as critical as a cellphone, I see no reason to rush into a commitment. If nothing else, the handset will probably be cheaper in three months!

Thoughts?

Topics: HTC, CXO

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36 comments
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  • Hats off to Google.

    Google will change the way phones are made, sold and used.

    Once again Linux plays its part in this unfolding story.

    Google continues to expand its products and services and is a positive force in benefiting society.

    Don't choke on your doughnut Adrian.
    D T Schmitz
    • Buwahahahaha

      Again, it?s all rumor, speculation and guesses. As far as we know for sure, this thing could be built entirely of Unobtanium by unicorns using nothing but their horns for tools.
      No_Ax_to_Grind
      • January 5 will tell the tale.

        nt
        D T Schmitz
        • Then keep your hat on until then. (nt)

          .
          No_Ax_to_Grind
          • Take it easy with those doughnuts yourself!

            nt
            D T Schmitz
          • No idea what you mean...

            But thats ok, your posts quite often are without much meaning. ;-)
            No_Ax_to_Grind
          • OK, how much sense does this make?

            Rarely do I find anything at ZDNET which is positive about anything other than Microsoft products.

            Adrian's blog only reinforces that point. It didn't serve any purpose, hence the remark "don't choke on your doughnut".

            Your remark:

            [i]"As far as we know for sure, this thing could be built entirely of Unobtanium by unicorns using nothing but their horns for tools."[/i]

            Seriously, does that even make sense?

            Just open your fave search engine (Bing) and search on HTC Nexus One and you'll find tons of info about the Google Phone.

            It's killing you that Google is planning yet another product roll-out that runs open source and Linux. Yes?

            Got nothing constructive to say? Nothing new Don Rupert/BitByte?

            [u]You[/u] are spouting nonsense--same situation, different day.
            D T Schmitz
          • As usual, wrong again.

            I actually hope it does well and it makes no difference to me what OS it runs, I hate cell/smart phones and only have one out of neccesity when traveling long distances by auto. I have a charger in the car and unless I am on the road the cell is in the glove box out of sight - out of mind. In fact I am lobbying my state legislature to completely ban their use while driving including "hands free" operation. I personally think they are the biggest intrusion to privacy and quiet enjoyment ever created. Some idiots think that just because they have your number you are open to them 24/7. That is something I QUICKLY correct people on. If its not a real emergency, I have more than a few choice words for them before I hang up and block their future calls. More than one client has been told to call my office number and leave a message and I will get back to them when I am in the office.
            No_Ax_to_Grind
          • Who do you think you are? Mike Cox? pffffft.

            nt
            D T Schmitz
          • When youy know you are wrong and have no clue, call names.

            How very common...
            No_Ax_to_Grind
          • Buwahahahaha

            You are overcompensating.
            D T Schmitz
  • Won't work on Verizon or Sprint

    Since the Nexus One is GSM, the unlocked phone won't work on either Verizon's or Sprint's network.
    Tom12Tom
    • Well to add to the rumors...

      there is no reason why the Nexus one can not also have a CDMA version.
      mrlinux
      • except

        Just having a CDMA version of your device isn't good enough to get your phone connected to Verizon. You can't just go out and buy any old phone and use it with Verizon like you can with most GSM systems. Google would have to get the device certified for use on the network, etc. Seems like the politics would be complex with Verizon releasing tons of their own devices.

        However, I'd like to be proved wrong. I'd really like to see an Android phone with both CDMA and GSM similar to Blackberry's World Edition phones.
        cabdriverjim
        • except

          the frequency auction Verizon won may change that.

          http://www.consumeraffairs.com/news04/2008/03/verizon_spectrum.html

          Google, which had put up a bid of $4.6 billion in the auction, was not among the winners. But by placing its bid, it triggered the "open access" requirement of the auction, mandating that any company which bought the spectrum enable any phone or device from any network to use it.
          mrlinux
    • And 3G only on T-Mobile.

      And tmobile makes AT&T look like an amazing network.
      Bruizer
  • RE: HTC Nexus One/Google Phone ... more questions than answers

    The one thing you can be sure of is that Google will monitor your voice and data. This is a requirement that they need to stay in business. Without your info they have no business to sell. If you value your privacy you will stay far away from this phone. I wouldn't put it past Google to act a lot like RIM and any conversation you have becomes their property. Best bet is to hold off on this phone indefinitely.
    Loverock Davidson
    • Who's monitoring who?

      According to Chris Soghoian at CNet, while firms such as AT&T, Verizon and Sprint directly collaborated with NSA on the agency's driftnet-style surveillance programs, legal experts are now suggesting that the public-private partnership in illegal spying may run far deeper into the wireless phone industry than anyone suspects.

      With over 3,000 wireless companies operating in the United States, the majority of industry-aided snooping likely occurs under the radar, with the dirty-work being handled by companies that most consumers have never heard of. (Chris Soghoian, "Exclusive: Widespread Cell Phone Location Snooping by NSA?", CNET, September 8, 2008)
      Also...

      Intelligence Support Systems Industry (ISS), "which sells analysis tools to government agencies, police forces and--increasingly--the phone companies themselves," the least interesting thing about your call may be what you say. Soar writes,

      At a very rough estimate half a trillion calls are made each day on the world's mobile networks: their origin and destination, their time and duration and all identifying codes are logged on telecom provider hard-drives and generally retained, under emerging legislation, for up to two years. It's impossible to exaggerate the value of these data. ... At the frequent ISS conferences--Dubai, Qatar, Washington, Prague--one of the key topics of discussion tends to be how to identify targets for LI (that's 'lawful intercept') in the first place: it's a cinch to bug someone, but how do you help a law enforcement agency decide who to bug? ("Daniel Soar Considers Mobile Surveillance," London Review of Books, 14 August 2008)
      Agnostic_OS
      • At least the NSA knows how to keep a secret.

        I'm not thrilled with AT&T handing over data to the NSA, but if they do
        I'm fairly confident they won't be reselling it to someone on AdWords.
        matthew_maurice
  • RE: HTC Nexus One/Google Phone ... more questions than answers

    "The one thing you can be sure of is that Google will monitor your voice and data. This is a requirement that they need to stay in business. Without your info they have no business to sell."

    You can only be taken seriously if you could back those statements up with some facts. However, you have none, so there is no reason to follow your advice. There's certainly no more reason to be afraid of this phone than an AT&T phone, a company that actually has some documented experience providing your phone data to the feds.
    pkellmey@...