Jobs: 'Blu-ray is just a bag of hurt'

Jobs: 'Blu-ray is just a bag of hurt'

Summary: Today during the Q&A session following Apple's notebook event, Steve Jobs said "Blu-ray is just a bag of hurt."

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Take note Blu-ray Association ...

Today during the A&A session following Apple's notebook event, Steve Jobs had this to say about Blu-ray:

"Blu-ray is just a bag of hurt. It's great to watch the movies, but the licensing of the tech is so complex, we're waiting till things settle down and Blu-ray takes off in the marketplace."

But, as Phil Schiller (senior vice president of worldwide product marketing at Apple) pointed out, Apple doesn't really feel the need to embrace Blu-ray:

"We have the best HD movie and TV options in iTunes."

[poll id=377]

I get the feeling Blu-ray needs Apple more than Apple needs Blu-ray.

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54 comments
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  • Care to back that up?

    [i]I get the feeling Blu-ray needs Apple more than Apple needs Blu-ray.[/i]

    Care to explain why the association which won the HD war needs the support of a company that has 0 penetration in the living room? Ask Jobs if he thinks AppleTV is a serious product and he'll tell you himself that it is just a hobby product. Care to explain why consumers will embrace the onerous DRM that comes with Apple's movie rental service that gives you 24 hours to watch a movie before it is lost forever instead of something like Netflix that gives you as much time as you want? Care to explain why consumers would want to pay more for a highly artifacted iTunes rental that claims it is HD but where every second pixel is a repeat instead of a medium that actually gives you real 1080p?

    Is streaming the way of the future? Probably, but it isn't here yet and all the critics agree that of all the current streaming solutions, Apple's is the worst. Apple usually sits on the sidelines while every one else does all the hard innovative stuff before coming in and claiming to have invented the technology but Apple screwed up this time and got in too early.
    NonZealot
    • well . . .

      "Ask Jobs if he thinks AppleTV is a serious product and he'll tell you himself that it is just a hobby product."

      If I knew how to contact him, I would. I'm not taking your word for it.

      "Care to explain why consumers will embrace the onerous DRM that comes with Apple's movie rental service that gives you 24 hours to watch a movie before it is lost forever instead of something like Netflix that gives you as much time as you want?"

      Why do you think Apple is complaining? They dislike the DRM everybody is forcing them to use. Blu-Ray licensing [b]is[/b] a big mess.

      "Care to explain why consumers would want to pay more for a highly artifacted iTunes rental that claims it is HD but where every second pixel is a repeat instead of a medium that actually gives you real 1080p?"

      Yeah, it's not very good right now, but that's just current technology. I'm sure as technology improves, Apple will fix that ASAP.
      CobraA1
      • 720P is good enough for right now...

        ...and unless you're sitting 3 feet from a 65 inch flat panel,
        you're not going to notice that much of a difference
        between 720P and 1080P.

        Apple will have 1080P rentals and movies in the future for
        iTunes and AppleTV, but both QuickTime for Windows and
        the AppleTV hardware need a refresh before it can be
        supported (QTWin sucks and a 1GHz processor paired with
        a GeForce 7300 is a joke for even the 720P movies and TV
        shows).
        nix_hed
        • Perhaps you should get one

          Yes there is a huge difference between true 1080p and standard definition and my 52" LCD 1920x1080 is attached to my computer with a Blu-Ray player as well as HD cable.

          I can get full HD movies through cable, download them or watch them on Blu-Ray. Yes the HD version is much better than the same movie in standard definition and any SD broadcast shows easily visible artefacts on HD.

          As usual, Apple pretends to be leading edge but leaves it to design and marketing, not actually new hardware or software. Proving once again you can fool some of the people, all of the time.
          tonymcs@...
      • Well Disney is one of the founders...

        So Steve should have some influence at Disney, since he is on the board ??? Seems like he could work that out.


        http://www.aacsla.com/founders
        mrlinux
    • Apple is playing it right

      Blu-ray won the battle but prices went up as the monopoly situation permitted. Demand then fell since other technology alternatives exist. A phyrric victory for Blu-ray and the MPAA. We don't need no stinkin Blu-ray. It is hardly a discriminator in the Computing market when coupled with commodity priced hardware. Even the higher priced Mac platforms cannot absorb the cost and draw folks into the technology.
      jpratchios@...
    • Apple the "innovator"

      "Apple usually sits on the sidelines while every one else does all the hard innovative stuff before coming in and claiming to have invented the technology..."

      I am glad that I am not the only person who sees this. The media seems oblivious to it.
      bblackmoor@...
      • "The media seems oblivious to it."

        You do too, it seems. What Apple claims it has created,
        it did create. What people like you [i]say[/i] that Apple
        says it created is far, far more.

        Apple didn't create USB, they just made it desirable
        when nearly every other manufacturer passed it up as
        worthless.

        That's only one example. Maybe you can give others?
        Vulpinemac
        • Apple supported firewire

          not USB. Apple was forced to go to USB because everyone else supported USB.
          Yax_to_the_Max
          • That is incorrect.

            It's funny, I have been on reading ZDNET for over 10 years and I remember when USB came out in the mid/late 90's all the Anti-Apple zealots on ZDNet were chiding Apple for choosing USB when other computer manufacturers did not seem to think it was important. USB 1.0 was released in 1996 but nobody adopted it and there were few after market devices that made it to market either. It wasn't until 1998 when USB 1.1 came out and Apple included it in the original "Bondi blue" iMac G3, that it became popular throughout the industry. Infact, the Apple iMac was the first computer to offer USB ports without offering "legacy" ports. Which showed that Apple was pushing the technology hard on their systems.
            Most PCs of the time were only available with parallel and/or serial ports.
            Tigertank
          • Nope - afraid you are..

            Apple invented Firewire back in 1995 (along with Sony and others) as their answer to the clutter of component connections on computers, whereas USB 1.0 was created by a consortium with Intel and Microsoft being main players.

            Apple didn't adopt USB as a standard replacement for their failed Firewire initiative until the time you mention above (iMac G3 - 1998) - which was a full two years after it was released.

            So - really - this just points to the fact that Apple will adopt technologies that existed before if they eventually deem them worthy and then have their hive mind users re-write history. Unfortunately, enough of us were actually around then, and still now, to know the truth.
            cjames@...
          • Which goes back to what I said...

            Apple never claimed to [i]invent[/i] USB, they just made it
            something everybody had to have.

            Nobody bothered to refute my statement or accept my
            challenge.
            Vulpinemac
          • Are you responding to the correct post?

            I wasn't even talking about Firewire.

            Yes I know about Firewire, but I was commenting on the previous posters assertion that the mass adoption of USB took place on the PC and that Apple came along later.
            That as I said was false, because USB was languishing on PC's until Apple included it on the first iMac. That is evident in the fact that most of the first batch of 3rd party USB devices were released in translucent plastic enclosures to match the iMac .

            [i]So - really - this just points to the fact that Apple will adopt technologies that existed before if they eventually deem them worthy[/i]

            That is correct. When did I say different? The point is Apple waited until USB 1.1 which worked out alot of the kinks. After the iMac had USB as it's ONLY peripheral connection, did 3rd party manufacturers start making USB products available everywhere.

            [i]and then have their hive mind users re-write history. Unfortunately, enough of us were actually around then, and still now, to know the truth.[/i]

            Yeah, I'm one of them. Who's rewriting history? It's like you came prepared to for the talkback forum with a pre-set argument and bag of insults; couldn't find the appropriate comment to respond to, and so posted it anyway.
            Tigertank
          • Nonetheless Apple was first to adopt USB...

            The fact that Apple introduced Firewire prior to including USB on their computers doesn't change the fact they were the first manufacturer to make it standard on mainstream PC's and eliminate legacy ports, and so finally drive the more widespread adoption of a technology that had already languished for several years. It wasn't until 1-2 years after the original iMac that mainstream Windows PC's could readily be found with any USB support (I'm talking retail-level PC's, not build-it-yourself from components). The fact that until Windows 98SE came out that the OS level support was poor was no doubt a part of this, but the fact remains, Apple had a big role in popularizing USB. Unlike Firewire, they didn't develop it, of course.

            Apple bashers will find fault regardless of the facts, but at least try to stick to the topic at hand. Judging by the fact Dell is charging a stiff premium, especially in laptops, to include a Blu-Ray DVD, I can see Blu-Ray remaining a build-to-order option for Apple, but why not offer it, even if it's expensive? Let customers decide if it's worth a big price hit. No doubt what is really going on is Apple is holding out for more favourable pricing/licensing on Blu-Ray. I don't know if that makes sense or not - I don't have enough information to judge. If early pricing sets a precedent for later, maybe it's a smart move, but I would assume pricing will come down over time anyway, so again, they could get a better deal later and still offer it as an option now.
            rx7racer
          • Check your history.

            On the first iMac, Apple put both USB and FireWire on
            board... after nearly everyone else had passed on it.
            When third-party manufacturers started making iMac-
            looking USB peripherals out, [i]then[/i] the others stood
            up and took notice.
            Vulpinemac
          • Firewire and USB were complementary...

            It's also worth noting that USB and Firewire in their original iterations were not competing technologies - USB was intended for connecting low data-rate peripherals such as keyboards, mice, and printers, while Firewire/IEEE1394 was conceived of as a successor to SCSI - a high data-rate connection for scanners, cameras, external hard drives, and the like. Once USB 2.0 came along, it was cheap enough and good enough for most people's needs to largely displace Firewire.
            rx7racer
          • PCs had USB before Apple, just not good support

            Macs may have been the first to rely on USB, but then
            again, Apple is all about simplicity. PCs are all
            about legacy support. And new stuff is often slow to
            be adopted on PCs - how many new PCs have HDMI? How
            many still have VGA as their only video ports?

            While PCs had USB ports in 1996 (standard on business
            IBMs), support for them was weak, to say the least.
            Macs didn't have them until 1998. (And PC support was
            still weak.)

            PCs are only now dropping floppy drives, while Apple
            dropped them, relying on network or CD-ROM, back with
            the first iMac. That doesn't mean that Apple invented
            the CD-ROM.
            MWPollard
    • Wonderful insight

      Steve Jobs:

      "[i]we?re waiting till things settle down and Blu-ray takes off in the marketplace[/i]"

      NonZealot:

      "[i]Apple usually sits on the sidelines while every one else does all the hard innovative stuff before coming in and claiming to have invented the technology[/i]"

      Seems blatant mis-representation doesn't bother Non-Zealot in the slightest. Name one technology Apple has claimed to invent that they didn't.

      NonZealot? Non sequitur.
      Fred Fredrickson
      • Claiming...

        You choose a single word in the post to disagree with. Apple does claim to be technological innovator. To quibble over whether they "claim" to have invented any specific technology or not is nit-picking.
        deanders
    • You want a <i>feeling</i> backed up?

      Please cite sources on how one should go about doing such.
      seanferd