Seagate announced super-slim 2.5in Momentus Thin hard drive

Seagate announced super-slim 2.5in Momentus Thin hard drive

Summary: As gadgets such as notebooks and netbooks try to cram more computing into a smaller space, this puts pressure on the individual component manufacturers to make their products smaller. Today Seagate unveils its Momentus Thin super-slim hard drive.

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As gadgets such as notebooks and netbooks try to cram more computing into a smaller space, this puts pressure on the individual component manufacturers to make their products smaller. Today Seagate unveils its Momentus Thin super-slim hard drive.

So, what's the big deal about the Momentus Thin? Well, it's thin. Really thin. 7mm/0.276in to be precise, making it much thinner than other 2.5in drives currently available. Seagate promises "lower cost-per-gigabyte" so this drive will allow makers of ultra-thin notebooks to use cheaper 2.5in drives instead of a 1.8in drive or solid-state hard drives.

Note: No pricing has been announced yet.

The 2.5in Momentus Thin is a single-platter drive and will be available in 160GB and 250GB capacities. Other spec highlights include 5,400RPM, 8MB cache, SATA 3GB/s interface.

Topics: Laptops, Hardware, Mobility, Storage

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9 comments
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  • Sorry, Seagate!

    While I am sure your product will sell.

    Solid State is the future, your product will most likely have a short lifespan.

    Also, not that I have seen any reviews, but I find it hard to believe that these will be reliable... and if there is 1 thing in my computer that I need reliable, it is the hard drive.
    narbytrout
    • Not quite yet

      Solid state is great - have one for my notebook - but still too expensive for the $299 crowd that still expects to get a 160+ GB HD

      Price point on solid state needs to come down further. Like it or not there's a market in the sub-$400 netbook/laptop space and those folks aren't getting solid state for a while
      archangel9999
  • RE: Seagate announced super-slim 2.5in Momentus Thin hard drive

    Will these new drives fit into existing laptops and notebooks
    with shims or brackets?
    lundp9
    • It appears so.

      Looking at the images here and at Seagate and what limited information Seagate released it should fit into existing mounting hardware and most mount points. Also 5400RPM which pitifully slow and at 160GB & 250GB which is at the low end of capacity scale now but I think they are targeting the netbook market with this thin drive. However, they need to get much faster drives and better capacity since SSD and other technologies will overtake them and leave them in the dust.
      phatkat
  • RE: Seagate announced super-slim 2.5in Momentus Thin hard drive

    Ummm sorry solid State but seems mag vortex is really going to be the way to go
    Erich611
  • Uh, let the 5400 rpm die already.

    I am a technician who does a lot of re-imaging of laptops for customers. Those with Vista seem to take longer to do "stuff" anyway, but invariably it's the hard disk that's the slowest component in the system.
    I'm sick to death of waiting for that HDD led to go out so I can begin working on it.
    Lovs2look
  • excessive defect rate of high capacity hard disks?

    For quite some time now, the customer review section of newegg.com has been rife with comments about the failure rates of high capacity hard disks, both 3.5"
    and 2.5". While most of the comments have been about Seagate hard disks (especially notorious is the 1.5 TB 3.5" SATA internal HD), other brands (WD, Hitachi, Samsung) haven't been immune.

    Is anyone in the trade press covering this phenomenon?

    I am hesitant to buy any large capacity or bleeding edge hard disks because of this phenomenon.
    rosanlo
    • Reasonable use...

      I think that the operative expression here is "reasonable use". I've been happily owning an external WD MyBook 1GB HDD for almost a year now. I've been using it on E-SATA as a "storage compartment" for everything and anything starting from HDD backups to holiday pictures and movies, and all the bits and pieces, including files I move from work home and viceversa. I have avoided shaking it too much although I must admit it has, on one occasion been tipped from the desk to the carpet covered floor by my wife, while cleaning... Hmmm... No damage. So far. Anyway... The darn things have such a low price that I think I'll buy another as a "backup's backup" just in case...
      Kostaghus
      • failure reports not restricted to newegg.com

        The failure reports are not restricted to newegg.com customers, by any means. People on deal sites (slickdeals, fatwallet, for example)
        are also reporting excessive failures.

        The failures range from out of the box (which is a gigantic no-no) to occurring after several months of operation.

        For the previous poster's information, hard disks are supposed to be able to handle continous operation or high duty cycles. That is what the MTBF (mean time between failures, specified in hours), and POH (power on hours) specifications mean.

        Even if hard disks were rated only for light
        duty cycles, that would not explain out of the box failures.

        If hard disk manufacturers wanted their products to run only for a certain number of hours a day, they should so state in their product information. Hard disks have been used in computers for a very long time now, since the 1960s (if memory serves, at least), and they have always been rated for continuous use.

        In the case of the Seagate 1.5 TB failures,
        it was only after reports of an almost epidemic rash of failures that Seagate finally 'fessed up to "firmware issues", so MTBF wasn't really the problem. Still, a nonresponsive hard disk, or one that loses data, is as bad as one with a bad motor or crashed head.

        Seagate has lost many computer enthusiasts' trust, and may never regain it.
        rosanlo