Ubuntu 7.10 "Gutsy Gibbon" features

Ubuntu 7.10 "Gutsy Gibbon" features

Summary: Ubuntu 7.10 "Gutsy Gibbon" features revealed.

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TOPICS: Open Source
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Just as I'm getting used to Ubuntu 7.04 Feisty Fawn, details of the next version, 7.10 (codenamed "Gutsy Gibbon"), have been released.

Here are some highlights:

  • Ubuntu 7.10 will ship with the latest edition of the GNOME desktop, 2.20, released a few weeks before our own release.  Kubuntu 7.10 will ship with KDE 3.5.7, and should also include packages of KDE 4.0 rc 2 available for optional side-by-side installation.
  • Ubuntu 7.10 will use the 2.6.22 Linux kernel, along with our usual selection of updated and additional drivers. We will also use Xorg 7.3, giving better graphics hardware support and the option of hotplugging monitors (RandR 1.2) and input devices (xserver 1.4).
  • Some "winmodem" chips will be supported out of the box, where drivers are available.
  • As announced, Ubuntu 7.10 will be first release to include a new Mobile and Embedded edition targeted at hand-held devices and other mobile/embedded form factors.
  • For increased security, the AppArmor security framework will be available as an option for those that want it.
  • Ubuntu 7.10 should function significantly better when the filesystem is full or otherwise not writable, allowing the user to make room and then continue working without undue interruption.

Final release is scheduled for October 18th 2007.

Topic: Open Source

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22 comments
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  • Looks good to me.

    I'll have to give it a go and see how it runs on the old dell.
    maldain
  • Polished

    Ever more polished! I for one will certainly give it a spin. But until the final release in October, I'll stick with 7.04 Feisty Fawn. I'm not much of an alpha or beta tester.

    Greetz, Pjotr.
    pjotr123
  • Just keeps getting better and better

    Ubuntu is by far the best Linux distro.
    DarthRidiculous
    • RE: Just keeps getting better and better

      ...Ubuntu is by far the best Linux distro....

      We all have our favorites. I have gone through about 30 distros, including representatives of the Debian based, Slack based, and Red Hat/Mandrake based as well as a couple of compile everything distros. I have settled on PCLinuxOS, having first tried it as 0.92Nvidia, then 0.93a and finally 2007. Great on hardware selection, good distro for the NOOB, guru, or developer. Huge online repository of software and you go CLI if you want to, not because you have to. Live CD/with install option. Definitely worth a look-see...
      joe6pack_z
    • Indeed

      I applaud what Canonical is doing to make Ubuntu easier to install and run "out of the box." Moreover, the Ubuntu community is a lot of fun. Still, I've settled between Fedora 7 and PCLinuxOS for better graphics right now.
      zaine_ridling
  • Need more seamless device/sw support.

    Ubuntu is the best there is today. We would attract more users if some critical aspects of software and device support are seamless.

    Take wireless networking for example. My pet peeve, since I've been wasting endless hours on it these past few days.

    Try setting up WPA-PSK or WPA2 with AES on Linux. Even old time Linux hackers like me get thoroughly put off. I mean, come [i]on[/i], the days of hand editing config scripts with vi and hand calculating passphrase hashes are [i]over[/i]. Just look at how nicely WEP works out of the box - WPA needs to become that.

    As for device support, it is claimed that Linux supports more devices than windoze. Great, now if we could only get this to happen without us needing to download driver source code from some kernel hacker in Belgium and set up NDIS wrappers to fumble with windows drivers.

    It's a valid point that some mfgrs don't release specs, but at the end of the day, [i]how easy is it to get working?[/i]? That's all the user cares about.
    kraterz
    • Improved fonts too

      One area that Windows XP and Vista have Linux beat is the appearance of fonts. I have tried tweaking the font settings in Kubuntu and no matter what I do, they just look blurry compared to XP with ClearType enabled. I've seen several others make this point, too.
      shoktai@...
    • PCLinuxOS has . . .

      the best wireless support I've seen. I have an Inspiron 6000 with one of those Dell Wireless 1390 Mini-PCI cards that everyone seems to have problems with. The LiveCD uses a graphical installer for NDISWRAPPER, making the install clean and STABLE. I can't even get any of the Ubuntu Distros to even install on the 6000 . . .
      JLHenry
    • ?????????????

      [i]Try setting up WPA-PSK or WPA2 with AES on Linux. Even old time Linux hackers like me get thoroughly put off. I mean, come on, the days of hand editing config scripts with vi and hand calculating passphrase hashes are over. Just look at how nicely WEP works out of the box - WPA needs to become that.[/i]

      Say what?

      Currently typing on my at-work (Kubuntu) laptop. Setting up WPA-PSK at home was a matter of lighting up KNetworkManager, picking the home SSID, and entering the passphrase.

      Setting up WPA-TKIP at work was the same; the network manager queried the network authenticator and only presented me with valid choices. Enter my credentials and [b]voila![/b] connected.
      Yagotta B. Kidding
      • Someone is using MS fanboy YBK's username

        Why else would he claim to use Linux and fire up like a B'stard when anyone dare to question dear uncles Bill and Steve.

        There could be a license/patent issue with using someone's username so be careful or YBK will have you!
        ihatelinux
    • Done any fresh Windows installs lately?

      You wrote:
      "As for device support, it is claimed that Linux supports more devices than windoze. Great, now if we could only get this to happen without us needing to download driver source code from some kernel hacker in Belgium and set up NDIS wrappers to fumble with windows drivers."

      Done any fresh Windows installs lately? More often than not, I've had top download several drivers from the manufacturers site. No biggie, unless one of the drivers happens to be for the NIC...
      Thank God for live linux cd's!
      handydan918
  • Learning curve

    I want an OS that I can easily manipulate my HD [explorer] and write batch files [command] to do
    automatic operations, and I find Linux too difficult to learn because of it's very
    large list of syntax's
    Having used a gui version of linux, the only use are the programs that came with the OS.
    I'm too old to start from scratch.! and it's not worth paying for the OS.
    So why change, I tried and don't like it.
    adolphsn@...
    • Ugh...

      First if you are writing batch files in Windows, then there is no reason you can't do it in Linux. What, you don't have an extra hour or two to learn something that should come pretty easy to you!?

      There are also GUI tools as well I am sure. Personally I don't know, I prefer to write my own bash files as needed! More funner that way.

      As for applications, there are an @sston of apps available. Your statement [B]"Ian McDonald
      Using the Linux OS since September 14, 1999
      The only limitations we have are the ones we set for ourself, therefore there is no box."[/B] is really confusing... WTF are you trying to say here?

      And as for too old... that is not a reason but an excuse to be lazy. ]:) and that's my opinion like it or not.
      Linux User 147560
  • Is it me, or...

    Is it just me or does Linux still seem to be years behind Windows and OSx in features and abilities.
    Narg
    • It's just you . . . ;) [nt]

      nt
      JLHenry
    • Hmm, I can speak to that...

      I started with Ubuntu by dual-booting with XP. Then I set up the home desktop to dual-boot. Time went on, I realized I was using Ubuntu 98% of the time or so, converted my laptop to Ubuntu only. Not long after, the wife asked me to do the same to the desktop. When you have things working right (a bit of a challenge sometimes, I'll admit), and you realize how much more productive you are when you don't have to interact with stupid system messages all the time, when your computer isn't phoning home every damn day to make sure your copy of Windows is genuine or not, when your computer's risk profile for malware and viruses drops by a factor of 50 or so, when you realize that you have a free alternative to almost every Windows program you can install, then you'll know why Linux is better. If you try it even with dual-booting, you'll be amazed. I encourage you to give it a shot. It's not like it will cost you anything.
      heres_johnny
      • I hope you're right

        I just started using Ubuntu 7.04 today('bout 8 hrs ago).I'm a total noobie, and it took me nearly two hours to get it up and running with dual booting, and though there are a few issues I have to say I'm impressed. The overall look and feel of the GUI was pretty good. getting used to the file system and where to find my music files(from windows)took maybe 15 minutes. One thing I'm pissed about was the audio quality- scratchy and flat. issues with the driver, i guess.
        another thing is installing new apps, even with Synaptic(it seems to look for everything online, even though the app I want is on DVD in the drive). I guess I'm too used to just getting an .exe file and double clicking on it, but I haven't quite figured out how to install Linux apps I've got on DVD(I'd prefer not to have to go into the cmd line interface). but still, all in all, I'd say I could get used to it. more reason to smile than frown(unless you work for MS or Apple).
        balaknair
        • When you insert the DVD, did it...

          Come up and say that it found it as a software repository?

          And what format are the programs in on the DVD?
          KWierso
        • You are!

          I am a total Linux Newbie also. I have a 4 year old Dell Laptop which was not just working right, so I did a clean install of Windows, it took me hours on 2 days to get it updated and running right. I've felt dissapointed by Microsft, so I decided to give Ubuntu a try, it took condiderably less time to get it installed and running, just had a hard time getting it to play DVD's. I messed up with a screen driver and had to do it all over again. Then I switched tu Kubuntu, which was even easier form me to get up and running. I like it better and it is working great!!!
          Nautilusbaja
    • Shhh... Your not supposed to notice.

      Now your gonna get the zealots all up in arms. Speaking the truth is not something they want from you.
      No_Ax_to_Grind