Windows Phone 7 update foul-ups continue

Windows Phone 7 update foul-ups continue

Summary: It's staggering that a company that manages to push monthly updates to hundreds of millions of PCs representing a bewildering array of hardware configurations has so much trouble pushing out updates to a handful of different handsets based on a supposedly well-reigned in spec. Once again Microsoft is having problems with Windows Phone 7 'NoDo' update.

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It's staggering that a company that manages to push monthly updates to hundreds of millions of PCs representing a bewildering array of hardware configurations has so much trouble pushing out updates to a handful of different handsets based on a supposedly well-reigned in spec. Once again Microsoft is having problems with Windows Phone 7 'NoDo' update.

While most Windows Phone 7 handset owners are on track to get their update (many already have it) problems still seem to revolve r two handsets.

The first is a handset that caused problems for Microsoft earlier this year - The Samsung Omnia 7. Once again Microsoft has been forced to stop sending updates to this handset. News of this latest update hiccup was broken by Michael Stroh in a comment on the Windows Team Blog:

Yes, we've temporarily stopped sending updates to Omnia7s. The team discovered a technical issue with the update package for this model. The work of fixing and testing the package is nearly done, and the team hopes to resume update deliveries soon. When I know more about the timing, I'll pass it along.

Another handset causing problems for Microsoft is the Samsung Focus. This handset too caused problems for Microsoft earlier in the year (which s hardly surprising given that it is essentially the US version of the Omnia 7). There are two hardware versions of this handset (REV 1.3 and a less common REV 1.4) and Microsoft won't be sending the 'NoDo' update to REV 1.4 handsets just yet. So if you've got a REV 1.4 handset, you can stop holding your breath for that update ...

Note: To find out which version you have, remove the battery cover and battery and check out the sticker.

Microsoft has been talking about the 'NoDo' update for Windows Phone 7 (the update that brings much-needed features such as copy and paste to the handset) since the beginning of 2011, but here we are in May and Microsoft is still having problems with this, the first major update for the platform.

So, who's to blame? Well, the problem here is down to Samsung and its hardware, there's no doubt about that, but ultimately it's Microsoft who is to blame because it (presumably) certified the Samsung hardware as being Windows Phone 7 compatible, thus allowing Samsung to sell this troublesome handset. There's obviously something rotten (or at least non-standard) about the design of these two Samsung handsets, and no one is owning up to the problem.

Given that this is the first of what we can assume to be many major updates for the Windows Phone 7 platform, so far the process has done enormous damage to Microsoft and the Windows Phone brand.

Pre-empting some questions that I'm bound to get:

  • Q: Would you recommend I buy a Windows Phone 7 handset? A: It's up to you. Problems currently seem confined to the Samsung Omnia 7 and Focus handsets.
  • Q: Should I buy a Samsung Omnia 7 or Focus handset? A: Until this mess is sorted out, I wouldn't.
  • Q: And after the mess is sorted out ... ? A: I'd still given them a miss.
  • Q: I don't have (or am not planning to buy an Omnia 7/Focus), so I'm in the clear, right? A: No idea. Like I said, this is the first of what I expect to be many updates to the Windows Phone 7 platform, and there have been plenty of problems. Who knows what problems future updates might bring.

Topics: Mobility, Microsoft, Operating Systems, Software, Windows

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107 comments
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  • They may have certified it, yet ultimately, it is Samsung

    as Samsung may have given them faulty data in which to certify against, changed a design slightly, or have incorrect documention.

    I find it suspect that all other manufactures have updated the software in their phones without incident, while Samsung has not.

    What is different, or has changed to have caused these issues?
    :|
    Tim Cook
    • Message has been deleted.

      Economister
      • RE: Windows Phone 7 update foul-ups continue

        @Economister <br>Why does it matter since Microsoft already fixed the issue with the Windows Phone Support Tool?
        illegaloperation
      • It is speculation, but would not looking at this logically

        @Economister
        in that only the Samsung phones appear to encounter the issue, so logic would dictate that we must view this as an issue relavent to Samsung, as the initial release of phones appear not to have this problem.
        Tim Cook
      • RE: Windows Phone 7 update foul-ups continue

        @Economister Obviously it is something wrong with the endusers. Remember Microsoft is perfect, so it could not be some<a href="http://www.tran33m.com/vb/">t</a>hing they did wrong. Needing a tool to root your phone, to install an update is nothing to worry about. Just ask one of the fanboys, Kin version 2 is the bestes phone OS available. wink
        alasiri5
    • RE: Windows Phone 7 update foul-ups continue

      @Mister Spock <br><br>If Samsung built the phone within MS specifications and then MS certified it, then it is hard to see how MS is not at fault. If Samsung did not build the phone within MS specifications and then MS certified it, then it is again hard to see how MS is not at fault. "Certification" means just that - certification. If MS are not doing a full and comprehensive certification, then they should be using a different term.
      Wakemewhentrollsgone
      • RE: Windows Phone 7 update foul-ups continue

        Its actually a pretty simple problem. Samsung, like most other OEMs like to mix and mash "equivalent" components per their availability. The problem is that the phone that MS certified isn't the phone that is being shipped. MS isnt going to have a hardware gestapo that checks every phone that Samsung sends out. Some manufacturing manager probably thought they were being productive :/ @ptorning
        WishyWashyWannabe
      • RE: Windows Phone 7 update foul-ups continue

        @WWW<br><br>IF that is the case, then I would agree that the Samsung is causing the problem. They have a responsibility to make the phone that was certified. if they've made changes that take it out of spec, then it begs the question as to why MS has not withdrawn certification.
        Wakemewhentrollsgone
    • Right

      Because we never have any problems with the other updates;-can't be MS fault.
      Richard Flude
    • RE: Windows Phone 7 update foul-ups continue

      @Mister Spock said, "Samsung may have given them faulty data"...but equally they may have given them perfect data and MS just dropped the ball. I believe the real issue was that few vendors wanted the WP7 OS and MS had to embrace any phone that would give them the time of day. I have no doubt they were more than willing to let Samsung do anything it wanted in exchange.
      Socratesfoot
    • RE: Windows Phone 7 update foul-ups continue

      @Mister Spock

      Agreed, something is up with these Samsung phones!
      Rob.sharp
    • RE: Windows Phone 7 update foul-ups continue

      @Mister Spock Tell that to the buying consumer that knows nothing about electronics or phones. They see windows, and microsoft is gonna get blamed. Does not matter if we think it's right or wrong, it's the way it is. And i'm sure they knew that from the get-go.
      xSteven777x
  • How do you rationalize making such an idiotic conclusion?

    Microsoft has already publicly stated that samsung released batches of phones with new firmware without ever even telling microsoft about it, let alone getting it certified. This is completely on samsung.
    Johnny Vegas
    • If that is a fact....

      @Johnny Vegas

      then the fault seems Samsung's. It still however drags MS into the mess and undermines WP7 when they can ill afford it.
      Economister
      • RE: Windows Phone 7 update foul-ups continue

        @Economister <br>And Microsoft also already fix the problem with the release of the Windows Phone Support Tool, but you won't ever congratulation Microsoft for fixing the issue.
        illegaloperation
    • Microsoft has already publicly stated

      @Johnny Vegas
      that samsung released batches of phones with new firmware without ever even telling microsoft about it, let alone getting it certified...
      Can you provide a link to that public statement?
      Eagerly waiting to read it (but not holding my breath...)
      theo_durcan
      • RE: Windows Phone 7 update foul-ups continue

        @theo_durcan What ... is Google and Bing blocked on your PC? Gingerbread is running into the same problem with the Galaxy S ... Samsung and Vodafone. Samsung is shipping phones with uncertified configs.
        I like coffee.
      • RE: Windows Phone 7 update foul-ups continue

        @I like coffee
        I asked a simple question: provide a link to that public statement by MS. Can you?
        or is just a lie?
        theo_durcan
    • RE: Windows Phone 7 update foul-ups continue

      @Johnny Vegas <br><br>I've not read that anywhere else, except for two posts on this site. Nonetheless, if that is the case, then why has MS not withdrawn certification?
      Wakemewhentrollsgone
      • RE: Windows Phone 7 update foul-ups continue

        @ptorning
        Notice this has not been labeled Updategate? Or are that few Wp7SOS phones that is does not warrant a major label?
        Rick_K