Intel productizes health monitoring

Intel productizes health monitoring

Summary: The Intel Health Guide is designed for people with chronic conditions, patients who currently call doctors regularly or have nurses come by. But it could become the first in a line of products for aging in place, an immense market.

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Intel Health MonitorIntel has gotten FDA clearance for a health monitor which can interface with wired or wireless health measurement devices such as glucose meters and blood pressure cuffs.

The Intel Health Guide is designed for people with chronic conditions, patients who currently call doctors regularly or have nurses come by. But it could become the first in a line of products for aging in place, an immense market.

When I first began writing about such products in 2003, I called this "The World of Always On," foreseeing WiFi networks as application platforms for medical, home inventory, security, and home automation applications.

The Health Guide is both more and less ambitious than that.

It's more ambitious in that it integrates personal communication with the doctor, medication reminders, educational information, and such functions as videoconferencing within the device.

It's less ambitious in that it is entirely application-specific, designed solely for health care. Many of its functions are also built around Ethernet-delivered wired communication, placing it in front of rather than behind a wireless router.

Intel has already done some pilot studies of the device but says it will conduct more, this time with health organizations which might act as re-sellers. Expect it to come available in the fourth quarter of 2009.

Me, I'm healthy but I want one now.

Topics: Software, CXO, Enterprise Software, Health, Intel, IT Employment

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8 comments
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  • Intel productizes health monitoring

    Dana, just need a bit of clarification. Would this replace the nurse visits or compliment it? The patient would have this if they needed to contact a nurse or check on medication, but would the nurse still visit?
    Loverock Davidson
    • A little of both

      This would both shorten nurse visits when they're necessary and eliminate some. How many depends on the patient's condition.

      Remember nurse visits are expensive. If you can be seen three times a week instead of five that's a very big deal.
      DanaBlankenhorn
      • Makes sense! Thanks! (NT)

        <&>
        Loverock Davidson
  • WOW...finally something USEFUL...

    ....instead of just hosing us for music, movies and games.
    Feldwebel Wolfenstool
    • That's what I've long thought

      I think this is a bigger deal than the release of the Apple iPhone 3G. But that's just me.
      DanaBlankenhorn
  • Jobs for MBA's in the Field

    It's just a shame the embedded small tech businesses don't
    get their earned 'Recognition' in the heart of leading the
    market with very challenging requirements for a wider
    audience space, ever it be so humble-

    http://tinyurl.com/574bcb
    dascha1
    • That's the way it is..

      The only reason Microsoft, a small company, was able to dominate the PC space in the early 1980s was because of IBM's sponsorship.
      DanaBlankenhorn
  • RE: Intel productizes health monitoring

    It's another big company moving into the space Bosch (bought Health Hero Network), Honeywell (bought Hommed) and Philips (several home health technologies) obviously believe this is a big space with lots of opportunities. Will be interesting to see how it all plays out.
    bjose