MRSA still vulnerable to soap

MRSA still vulnerable to soap

Summary: In all the growing excitement over MRSA, the "deadly," "flesh-eating" bacteria which the media is turning into another "gay plague," one very important point is being almost systematically ignored. It's still vulnerable to soap.

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TOPICS: Malware, Health
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Lifebuoy soap from A Christmas Story starring Peter BillingsleyIn all the growing excitement over MRSA, the "deadly," "flesh-eating" bacteria which the media is turning into another "gay plague," one very important point is being almost systematically ignored.

It's still vulnerable to soap. Simple lye-based soap. Wash your hands and, if you've been using the rest of yourself, wash that, too. Especially the naughty bits.

(Pictured, with apologies to Zathura producer Peter Billingsley, is the wrong way to administer this treatment. But I couldn't help myself.)

The biggest real "scandal" concerning MRSA is that the infection is not being accurately tracked, a bit of ignorance which can easily lead to panic.

And panic is where we're rapidly headed here, especially with headlines like "MRSA kills more people than AIDS."

In many ways we're going back to the earliest days of modern medicine, when Lister was a man instead of a mouthwash. (Complete with the patent medicines.)

The last century has seen a flood of "wonder drugs" enter the market, but the bugs have evolved to beat many of them, and it's time to return to basics.

Soap kills germs. Simple aspirin will treat many pains. You can either treat a cold aggressively and get better in 14 days or just wait 2 weeks.

In many ways your grandmother was right. Both my kids' grandmothers are still with us, both well into their 80s. I like to think it's because of their simple wisdom.

More of that, please.

Topics: Malware, Health

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3 comments
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  • Soap works

    I agree! Soap does work. And, you don?t have to use some super-duper antibiotic soap. 97% of all bacteria are beneficial to human development. Only 3% are harmful. For 60 years we have been trying to kill all the bacteria. It doesn?t work! They just grow stronger and more resistant to the antibiotics and disinfectants.
    In the first 6 months of 2007, a hospital in Belgium conducted a clinical trial. They proved that pro-biotic cleaning with a detergent that contained beneficial bacteria actually resulted in lower counts of pathogenic (disease causing) bacteria than cleaning with a registered disinfectant.
    Contact Koen Van Landeghem at AZ Lokeren Hospital in Ghent, Belgium. His e-mail is: Koen.van.landeghem@azlokeren.be . He has all the details
    Doug@...
  • Good point and

    along that line:
    Honey making a medical comeback
    Potent type used as antibiotic amid fears of drug-resistant superbugs

    http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/22398921
    Joeman57
    • We've discussed honey here...

      Honey does make a barrier against bacterial agents and is now available in military kits to treat wounds, as you note.

      But it's no better than a placebo against the common cold.
      http://healthcare.zdnet.com/?p=546
      DanaBlankenhorn