The hits keep coming against plastic bottles with bisphenol-A

The hits keep coming against plastic bottles with bisphenol-A

Summary: Tests of BPA done with doses now present in your body show reduction in brain function from this chemical. Not just in babies, but in adult primates.

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Bisphenol A in 3-D from Adiaha.comThe hits keep coming against bisphenol-A (BPA), a chemical used in plastics we come in contact with every day.

BPA was, until recently, used in most Nalgene bottles found on workers' desk and in baby bottles, as well as food containers. Some 93% of us have detectable levels of this in our bodies.

The latest hit is a study from the Yale School of Medicine, which gave monkeys what the EPA considers a "safe" dose of the chemical and found negative impacts on mood and memory.

“Our primate model indicates that BPA could negatively affect brain function in humans,” said study co-author Tibor Hajszan, M.D., associate research scientist in Yale Ob/Gyn. “Based on these new findings, we think the EPA may wish to consider lowering its ‘safe daily limit’ for human BPA consumption.”

But this comes just as the National Institutes of Health has come out with a limited all-clear on BPA. The National Toxicology Program says there is still “some concern” about BPA but has not recommended any action be taken.

Many of America's headline writers agree:

Someone check these folks' water bottles. Tests of BPA done with doses now present in your body show reduction in brain function from this chemical. Not just in babies, but in adult primates. Most of these headline writers are, I assume, adult primates.

Activist Richard Wiles said in response that the chemical industry is following "the tobacco industry's playbook" on BPA. The American Chemical Council said the same report "identified no serious human health concerns."

Bloggers are starting to write about this as a big, big scandal. (The 3-D model of bisphenol-A above comes from one such blog, Adiaha.com.) The issue is rapidly gaining traction.

The FDA plans a hearing on this September 16. Both academics and lobbyists have been invited. It's going to be "fun" for reporters, and could be political dynamite.

Think this might get into the Vice Presidential debate? I do.

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10 comments
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  • This no story

    Me have lots BPA and me no see no probelms. Me brain is work just fine.
    doodlius
    • my brain hurts

      Actually I have been having some memory problems
      lately. For the last two days I was searching my head
      for the word representing a re-staging of an old
      Broadway show.

      The word is revival.
      DanaBlankenhorn
      • My friend...

        that is age showing! :)
        Jim Blaine - Bellingham WA.
  • RE: The hits keep coming against plastic bottles with bisphenol-A

    Here is something many don?t realize. BPA plastics are used extensively in dentistry. People who had silver fillings removed because of fear of mercury had them replaced with composite material, which contains BPA.
    Darrell Pruitt DDS
    • ouch

      Fortunately my mouth is all-silver. And fake enamel
      because I have six falsies -- three destroyed in a
      car crash and three a bridge resulting from botched
      dental surgery when I was 10.
      DanaBlankenhorn
  • This just in

    Some day you will die.
    frgough
    • Yeah, yeah!

      And ozone in your lungs is good for you. Ronald Reagan said so, so it must be true.

      The real question is whether the risk described is acceptable, and that's a legitimate point for scientists to debate. It's not like vendors are going to willingly tell you what they use to make their containers (they will if Big Bad Government makes them, and that's about it).
      John L. Ries
  • RE: The hits keep coming against plastic bottles with bisphenol-A

    Current legislation is attempting to solve this problem by
    removing chemicals having EA (BPA, phthalates) one at a
    time. This approach, for legislators or the FDA, is not an
    appropriate solution for consumers because thousands of
    chemicals used in plastics exhibit EA, not just BPA and
    phthalates.The appropriate health-driven solution is to
    manufacture safer plastics that are EA-free.Technology
    already exists to produce EA-free plastics and the cost is just
    pennies more.-George Bittner, Ph.D.
    George_Bittner
    • Only pennies more?

      Second choices are never only pennies more than first choices. Nor are they better. That is why they are second choices.
      Darrell Pruitt DDS
      • Retrofitting

        Changing any manufacturing process costs a lot of
        money up-front, even if the resulting cost is, once
        the plant is running, pennies per product produced.

        Chemical plants are very complex.
        DanaBlankenhorn