Expect big-screen HDTV prices to drop in coming months

Expect big-screen HDTV prices to drop in coming months

Summary: The upcoming holiday season will see the usual price drops on HDTVs, but it appears that the larger sets may see the biggest price movement, good news if you're looking to purchase a new TV for Christmas.For the first time in four months, prices for HDTVs fell in August, according to IHS iSuppli.

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TOPICS: Hardware, Mobility
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The upcoming holiday season will see the usual price drops on HDTVs, but it appears that the larger sets may see the biggest price movement, good news if you're looking to purchase a new TV for Christmas.

For the first time in four months, prices for HDTVs fell in August, according to IHS iSuppli. While that amount was negligible in aggregate -- a drop of just $5 per set -- it was more pronounced for sets ranging from 40 to 49 inches (3% decline) and 50 inches and larger (2%). Riddhi Patel, IHS director for television systems and retail services, concludes that "Larger-sized televisions have been hard to sell given the slow economy and the absence in general of a big-enough price decline to motivate consumers to buy."

The research firm cites the example of Sharp, which has been consistently been releasing larger and larger sets as a market differentiator. However, that led to few sales until the electronics company began slashing prices on its 60-inch HDTVs, resulting in enough sales to cut into rivals' 55-inch set sales.

IHS found that inventories for larger sets were "much higher" than usual, a good sign that further price cutting is on the way. Already, the average plasma sized 50 inches or larger fell in price by $80 in August.

So if you're in the market for a really big HDTV, you may just want to resist the desire for instant gratification and sit tight a little longer to ensure a better deal.

Topics: Hardware, Mobility

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14 comments
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  • well duh

    People don't buy TVs every 2 years. They buy them every 10-20 years. There are plenty of people who are perfectly happy with their 5-year-old HDTV and 15 year old SDTV, and while price factors in, the companies making TVs should understand by now that the turnover rate for TVs is nowhere near the same as cell phones, and that more of the public has seen 3D TVs as the gimmick it is than they give them credit for.

    Joey
    voyager529
    • I in the 10-15 year camp myself

      @voyager529/Joey:
      We have an LCD/HD TV in our bedroom, and we like it. However, we also have a SDTV in our family room, where we watch most of our television. I'm also quite happy with that. The set is at least 10 years old and works just fine. Unlike (apparently) so many others, I don't buy just to buy or just because it's new. HDTV is nice, but it's not so great that I'm going to dump a TV with a perfectly acceptable picture. They can drop prices all they want but I won't be buying until a TV quits working and I need to replace it.

      I'll send kudos out to the early adopters though. I appreciate them spending their money so that I can get things at a lower cost later on.
      shawkins
  • RE: Expect big-screen HDTV prices to drop in coming months

    Joey, by "people" you are referring to yourself only, of course. Lots and lots of people *do* buy new TVs every couple of years or so, myself included. We like to stay on top of technology and get the latest and greatest. If "people" only bought a new TV every 10-20 years, do you really think the TV manufacturers would still be in business???
    davin8r
    • RE: Expect big-screen HDTV prices to drop in coming months

      @davin8r
      amen to that... the early adopters are the ones driving the technological (r)evolution, they have more money to burn that fuel innovations. kudos to all of them.
      kc63092@...
    • RE: Expect big-screen HDTV prices to drop in coming months

      @davin8r Why not? A 10 or 15 year cycle is normal for other big-ticket household goods, like refrigerators, washers, dryers, and carpeting. For air conditioners, it's more like 20 years. I don't see those makers going out of business. That said, most people own 2, 3, or even 4 televisions; their quantity per household helps offset the long purchasing cycle.
      paul613
  • RE: Expect big-screen HDTV prices to drop in coming months

    Until 4k comes into the home in any appreciable fashion, the best HDTVs you can yet buy are the final gen KUROs from Pioneer, and those, in brand new condition when you can find one, are only going UP in value. Anything else is just pissing in the wind, including the Sharp based Elite at a laughable $8000.00.

    I have both Samung and Sony's highest end LCDs from 2010 and find them to be generally average for the price paid compared to the benchmark KURO in picture quality.
    Playdrv4me
  • RE: Expect big-screen HDTV prices to drop in coming months

    I would love the "latest and greatest" just nowhere near being able to afford it so, I will wait until the machines break before considering buying new ones. Consider myself lucky the old codgers are still working well. For TV it is getting to be more and more of a pain in the you know what as more and more broadcasts are in just HD meaning bars for me. Sports is especially bad as the smaller is definitely worse and the picture from Fox and elsewhere comes in choppy and general poor quality. TV is supposed to be an escape from our problems but these networks insist on reminding the 25-30% or whatever of us are still on SDTV that we are behind.
    edkollin
  • Impove upon my CRT picture then we'll talk

    I have a Sony Trinitron 36XBR800 and I have yet to find a TV with a better picture. Bigger, yes. Better, no. I keep looking though. I research and browse the stores. Everytime I think I might have found a 50" or greater worthy I'm disapointed when I go stand in front of it and watch it. Even when viewing a widescreen movie or broadcast, which essentially shrinks my vertical picture, it is still wonderful to watch.

    Yes I would love to have something 60" and up but 1080p doesn't cut it at that size. Yes I realize I'm comparing a 36" to a 60" with the same resolution but that's what's on the market and that's what it will take for me to part with my money. As far as new features I would get with a new TV. I have zero interst in wearing glasses to watch TV. 3D without glasses might be available by the time good contect is ready but not a current interest. Blu-ray, NetFlix, etc. all work well through my attached player. Don't need those built-in.

    Any ideas what is coming down the pike I should watch for? Any new technologies on the horizon?
    autocog
  • RE: Expect big-screen HDTV prices to drop in coming months

    Now that it seems that more than 50% of the available broadcast hours are devoted to commercials, why bother?
    lodaver
    • RE: Expect big-screen HDTV prices to drop in coming months

      @lodaver : Personally I agree, but we should also recognize that the majority of todays buyers are typically very much into sports, rather than really boosting the technology of the display (or of the overall transmission system). The transition to DTV has been accomplished, and just about everyone who wants to has a piece of the newer tech.
      So, those sports oriented folks do "lead the market" IMHO, and that also keeps the prices higher than they just might sag to given a lower level of demand. Also, frankly the actual suppliers of goods are most likely guilty of overcompeting among themselves for market share, with the mistaken idea that winning market share will allow them to "contro"l the market and regain lost profits. Sadly US based hardware manufacturers labored under that mis-impression too long, and it finally killed them all. When was the last time you watched a program on TV and someone exclaimed "Look at that picture quality - isn't it great?" Most viewers just want to relax or vege. just sayin....
      Willnott
  • RE: Expect big-screen HDTV prices to drop in coming months

    Still using a SDTV (tube) in the living room for the mere reason that it works, perfectly. Not going to throw that one out until there truly is something that will revolutionize my viewing.
    As "lodaver" notes here above, the amount of commercials makes TV watching many times a pretty unpleasant experience. Paying for cable TV is only paying for the privilege of having access to a more efficient delivery vehicle for commercials.

    I have one CFL backlit LCD TV that died after 5 years, and a new edge lit LCD in the bedroom. Cool, but even with refresh rates in the 240Hz range, moving images are never as good on a HDTV as a good ol tube. And some flatscreens are truly horrible. Costco has the clip where you can see large herds of wildebeest running in and out of watering holes. Few HDTVs manage to display that one w/o serious flickering (source is a BlueRay disc).
    wellcraft19
  • If it Ain't Broke, Why Replace it?

    I know many want the latest and greatest tech toy, TV, Smartphone, tablet, etc. But as some have said, I can't see parting with a perfectly good TV. Kinda like jumping out of a perfectly working airplane. If a TV isn't made to last 10 years plus, then it shouldn't be on the market. Our primary everyday TV is a 10 year old 36" flat screen CRT Sony Wega Trinitron, on daily for 10-15 hours. Weighs a ton! We have other CRT TVs we view occasionally that are even older and still work just fine. Kids even took some of them to college.

    OK, we don't have HD, 1080P, or HDMI inputs but I'm still convinced that the old CRT technology renders superior colors, motion, blacks and of course viewing angles over LED or Plasma. While our Sony is starting to show some signs of age (one of the three color guns is getting weak), we will keep it until it dies. Given a choice I would replace it with a 40 inch CRT but I guess they aren't made anymore. Only then will I consider a big screen and that decision will be based, in part, on longevity.

    At my age (almost 70), I expect our next TV to outlive me.
    joep1701
  • If it Ain't Broke, Why Replace it?

    I know many want the latest and greatest tech toy, TV, Smartphone, tablet, etc. But as some have said, I can't see parting with a perfectly good TV. Kinda like jumping out of a perfectly working airplane. If a TV isn't made to last 10 years plus, then it shouldn't be on the market. Our primary everyday TV is a 10 year old 36" flat screen CRT Sony Wega Trinitron, on daily for 10-15 hours. Weighs a ton! We have other CRT TVs we view occasionally that are even older and still work just fine. Kids even took some of them to college.

    OK, we don't have HD, 1080P, or HDMI inputs but I'm still convinced that the old CRT technology renders superior colors, motion, blacks and of course viewing angles over LED or Plasma. While our Sony is starting to show some signs of age (one of the three color guns is getting weak), we will keep it until it dies. Given a choice I would replace it with a 40 inch CRT but I guess they aren't made anymore. Only then will I consider a big screen and that decision will be based, in part, on longevity. BTW, 3D is a gimmick. No way, no how.

    At my age (almost 70), I expect our next TV to outlive me.
    joep1701
  • Sale prices for the Holidays?

    Really? This is a blog to remind us that the prices will drop for Thankgiving/Black Friday and Christmas?

    Thanks for the heads up.
    cwallen19803@...