Kindling a controversy

Kindling a controversy

Summary: Ed Champion is investigating whether certain bloggers included in Amazon's Kindle launch were made "Kindle Blogs" without authorization or licensing. He cites two examples (Daniel McGowan and Cork Gaines) of bloggers who apparently are included in the Kindle Store without their permission.

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TOPICS: Amazon, Browser, Hardware
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Kindling a controversyEd Champion is investigating whether certain bloggers included in Amazon's Kindle launch were made "Kindle Blogs" without authorization or licensing. He cites two examples (Daniel McGowan and Cork Gaines) of bloggers who apparently are included in the Kindle Store without their permission. This surprises me. My personal blog Bag and Baggage is there in the Kindle Store too (I'm also quoted in Ed's post), but under an express agreement. It could be the Kindle team had some misunderstanding about the ramifications of the noncommercial use restriction in certain Creative Commons licenses; the initial email I received about participating did reference my Creative Commons license, but neither McGowan nor Gaines seem to use Creative Commons so I'm at a loss as to what's going on. In my case, Amazon had lots of communication with me about including Bag and Baggage, and crossed its T's and dotted its I's on the legal front.

[Updated 10:08 p.m.] Ed Champion has unearthed two more bloggers who are less than pleased with being Kindleized.

[Updated 11/22, 9:36 a.m.] Engadget reports the Kindle gave Amazon plenty to be thankful for, selling out the first batch in just 5.5 hours.

Topics: Amazon, Browser, Hardware

Denise Howell

About Denise Howell

Denise Howell is an appellate, intellectual property and technology lawyer who enjoys broad industry recognition for her expertise on the intersection of emerging technologies and law.

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  • RE: Kindling a controversy

    it's basically an "OPML"... do you have to authorize everyone who includes your blog in any OPML? i guess as long as they aren't charging a monthly payment to use the Kindle, it's like linking it from any website. according to my twisted interpretation anyway. sorry to hear about your Nani.
    Voodoo187
    • DOH

      although not that far off afterall. interesting...

      charge for delivery, though, is that like charge for content? if they still show all of the blog's ads and they're still capable of linking to the advertiser's websites and showing the advertiser's content...

      although, it doesn't seem capable. we are charged for cable TV from our cable companies who deliver it to us for content providers, who also pay the content providers a license for delivery, and content providers also sell advertising.

      so it depends i guess. i'm not familiar with the delivery method of the Kindle.
      Voodoo187