Have we raised a generation of pirates?

Have we raised a generation of pirates?

Summary: In view of proposed legislation that would restrict the web, have we created this reaction ourselves in the next generation of online users?

SHARE:

Printed, traditional media is on a downwards spiral.

No longer merely an accessory to the printed press, or an audio version of your favourite book to listen to in the car, online platforms are now major contenders in content distribution.

With an increasing reliance on online content, a way to recoup losses from the downward trend of print media is to charge for the no longer mere accessory, but necessity of engaging online content. Paywalls for content subscription services may have come a little too late to these systems.

(Source: Flickr)

A thirteen-year-old a decade ago -- who is not likely to know what copyright infringement is, who finally having access to dial-up, suddenly realises they can find and download that song they want.

It's free? 'Click here', connect, and download.

Within twenty minutes, they had their prize. Nothing besides the risk of fake, virus-laden files stopped them from downloading the entire album.

But times have moved on since the dial-up era.

Downloading content has become more sophisticated and the means in which to gain data -- whether legal or illegal -- has changed rapidly. Copied videos are now obsolete, and it's less about finding pirate DVD-touting street vendors. Instead, you connect to a peer-to-peer network, or you find the file via a search engine or BitTorrent client.

It's easy. You grab your torrent, and within minutes, the deed is done.

With increasingly tech-savvy teenagers learning the how and where of gaining their favourite movie or TV show, their self-education was ignored by industries in general. Piracy is not a phenomenon that sprung up overnight; 'cheating the system' will always exist, but the method in which it is performed evolves with the society it operates in.

Clients like BitTorrent allow users to find content they want very easily. Putting a figure on BitTorrent piracy alone is no easy task; and with the sheer amount of methods available to gain free content, bills like SOPA even in their original, draconian state will never stamp out online piracy.

With the admittance of those creating this legislation that they're out of their depth -- take Rep. Lamar Smith's comments for one: "I'm not a technical expert on this" -- we have to wonder whether they believe that the general public actually have the same grasp of digital knowledge.

The younger generation, having grown up with iProducts, broadband and the extended use of technology in schools, will be able to bypass laws set by politicians who don't understand their own legislation. It is highly unlikely that any laws passed won't have the cracks necessary to allow continual copyright infringement.

But it's not all about access to pirate content. The younger generation are used to having free content -- having grown up with access to an unchecked, digital vault full of files in which the keys were always available.

And then SOPA-like legislation suddenly exists. In return, so does a backlash of incredible proportions, with the sudden risk of the keys being stolen away.

The online community ended up in arms, and online corporations who would be affected joined them. Bills like the SOPA act are an extreme and uninformed reaction to online copyright infringement finally coming to the notice of institutions like the music industry.

But why the reaction? Is it truly about trying to catch the distributors of online copyrighted material, or is it something deeper than that?

Piracy is no longer talked of in hushed whispers in dark corners. People who grew up with online technology trade links in a blasé fashion across email and social networks, and think nothing of sending their friend the latest e-book for their Kindle. It has become such a normal aspect of the Generation Y's life that not eyelid is batted when discussing torrent networks or the quality of the latest cinema rip.

As we grew up, we normalised free content. Arguably, perhaps we internally normalised, if not moralised, piracy. It's not necessarily about the cash-strapped students, or the thrill of doing something illegal.

The Generation Y has grown up with streaming and downloading copyrighted material in the same way older generations not-so-guiltily taped their favourite film on television.

That's not to say that the only option in controlling piracy is to erect the 'Chinese Firewall 2.0', now available in Western edition. I would prefer to wait for that Blu-ray edition of the film I loved in cinema, rather than pick up a dodgy copy from the market with a persistent screen shake and the occasional popcorn-munching man blocking my view.

Persist with the legal, subscription-based models, allow it to grow, and perhaps after time the sheer scale of the pirating community will set sail. But fighting against taught expectations of continual free, easy access content may be the true battle.

Related:

Topics: Piracy, Enterprise Software, Security

Kick off your day with ZDNet's daily email newsletter. It's the freshest tech news and opinion, served hot. Get it.

Talkback

45 comments
Log in or register to join the discussion
  • Honey, vinegar, and so on

    If ever there were an issue that responds better to 'carrots' than to 'sticks', this is it. While the RIAA was dancing on the grave of Napster, the geekier among us saw that they had traded making a deal with Napster for the rise of P2P networks... something that no judge, no government, no bureaucrat could ever close down. By choosing to wield the stick instead of the carrot, the music industry created its own worst nightmare.

    Carrots would have worked, and we know that because iTunes has become the world's largest music store, where tens of million of people are perfectly willing to pay money for something they could quite easily download with a P2P client. This tells us that people are basically honest. They just react poorly to being treated like crooks and hit with sticks.
    Robert Hahn
    • don't agree

      @Robert Hahn
      these people didn't respond to being treated like crooks and being hit with sticks by stealing. they stole and stole and stole and then complained when they were treated like crooks. it wasn't the riaa that started it. sure, the riaa reacted the only way they knew, with the traditional lawsuit heavy hand approach. but their reaction does not negate the looting that was going on in the first place. their reaction was to wrongs being done to their business. no matter how one feels about that business, they were, shortsightedly, reacting the only way they knew.

      we also don't know if the people buying legally now were ever pirates. it could well be that they were the ones buying cd's. do we know if the pirate numbers have gone down? the success of itunes does not necessarily mean that illegal downloading has decreased.
      oneleft
      • The question is...

        @oneleft <br>...how much enforcement will buy how much compliance, what will it cost (economically and socially), and how much will any of this serve the ostensible purpose of the law, which is not "property" protection, but providing a financial incentive to creators. Note that protecting the creations of long dead artists does little or nothing to promote new creations and may actually retard them (why foster new talent when it's easier to make money selling the tried and true?).<br><br>I'm all for obeying and enforcing the law, but if the cost of credible enforcement ends up exceeding the benefits of having the law, then I think the law needs to be reconsidered.<br><br>The real problem is that respect for law has greatly diminished over the past 50 years, which makes enforcement of all sorts of laws much more difficult than it was in years past. About the only things that will fix that are honest lawmaking (people aren't likely to respect laws written by politicians on the take); honest, impartial enforcement (laws are rules, not weapons); and a public perception that the laws we have are actually beneficial (which had better be the reality).<br><br>I'm not holding my breath.<br><br>Reply to oneleft:<br><br>I'm not talking about any sort of "Arab Spring". I'm being pragmatic and I actually am in favor of copyright laws (I even obey them). You're correct that lots of people see nothing at all wrong with non-commercial copying of copyrighted materials and will do it no matter what the law says, as long as the risk of detection and punishment is low. The questions are, what do we do about it and how much enforcement is really worth it? Remember that twice as much enforcement won't buy anywhere near twice as much compliance (it's called the law of diminishing returns and it holds for just about anything).

        I'm not overly concerned about the supposed right of Robert E. Howard's heirs to be paid for publishing a Conan story (it is certain that Howard will never write another), or the right of Disney to be paid every time a Mickey Mouse cartoon is viewed. I'm much more concerned about the rule of law and insuring that copyright laws actually do the job they're intended to do, which is to encourage publication of new creative work.
        John L. Ries
      • all well and good

        @John L. Ries
        but i don't see your point. we're talking about people who feel some kind of right to free music and movies. we're not talking about arab spring here.

        you may feel that the business model of old artists isn't good for new artists but that doesn't give one the right to loot. you do have the right to not do business with them. reconsidering the law and breaking it are not the same thing.

        i've read a lot of arguments by the looters. the record companies cheat the artist, cd's are overpriced, music should be free, blah blah blah. none of them justify what they do. they're trying to justify their looting. nothing more.

        i especially love the cd's were overpriced. compared to what? i buy a cd i have a lifetime of music that i never have to pay for again. ever. i buy a coke out of machine for $1.50 and it's gone in 3 minutes. i want another one later i buy it again. shoes, food, gas, clothes... a music cd is the only thing that i don't have to buy again and again. name something else that can do that. you go to a ballgame and you've dropped $50. you go to a concert and pay the $50 and also buy the cd you can relive that forever.

        i've never seen a breakdown of the cost of a cd... studio, janitors, engineers, mastering, etc compared to something else. who decided this was a bad deal? the looters?
        oneleft
      • The opportunity cost of reproduced music is excessive

        @oneleft
        People don't seem to think that if they don't pay for it cheaply by CDs or download, the alternative is to hire the artists on demand. Good luck hiring the Stones or Lady Gaga for their commute tomorrow morning!

        The simple message is that unless the recordings are paid for, there will be little music. The disengenuity comes when people download mainly what the large labels have spend fortunes letting them know exists. They want their free cake for lunch and eat it too!

        The problem is that the large labels know they have been ripping off artists for years (with contracts almost as bad as the latest Apple iBook ones), and seem to have a hard time owning up to it and moving on.
        Patanjali
    • RE: Have we raised a generation of pirates?

      @Robert Hahn <br><br>Yes I agree. The first thing is to not make laws you can't enforce and besides putting the occasional grandmother in jail pour encorager les autres, they can't enforce it.<br><br>The issue is also not very clear cut. Let's agree the orginal seeder is a thief and the copy s/he made of the orginal is illegally obtained (no he/she didn't "steal" the orginal). However, downloaders and other seeders are essentially transmitting another copy of apparently illegally obtained goods (which the user may suspect, but actually has no proof the material is stolen - sometimes the producers put up copies for entrapment). So not piracy, but perhaps receiving stolen property?<br><br>Then we have the problem of access. If some befuddled program buyer doesn't buy your desired tv show or film then you won't have access to it - especially outside the US. Then there's licencing - I can legally watch broadcast programs and have a cable membership. Any program that I want, I can download peer to peer immediately or I can wait 2-3 months for them to show up on broadcast or cable - if I do this am I a pirate or simply time shifting?<br><br>The other reason for peer to peer is advertising. Unless a tv show is made for ads like NCIS for example, advertisements destroy the coherence of a show or film and even watching a slightly lower resolution torrent is better than a higher res one interrupted every 10 minutes.<br><br>Yes, a carrot would have worked. Neworks and developers should band together and sell torrent memberships and put up their shows. I note a lot of TV stations already offer their programming on-line - especially broadcast shows. <br><br>The reality is you can't stop tv shows/fims/audio being copied, but you can rely on the honesty of most people if you gave them an opportunity to pay for this access.
      tonymcs1
  • I think we have

    I think there are several issues at play, the first of which is that people aren't nearly as law-abiding as their grandparents and great-grandparents were. This is not to say that people have become overtly criminal (I think most people still have an internal sense of right and wrong); it's just that obeying the law for its own sake has fallen out of fashion. Thus, as long as an illegal act doesn't offend one's personal sense of morality, one is not likely to be "caught" (much less punished), and the rewards seem greater than the risks, I suspect that most people (especially the young) will go ahead. This has been going on for several generations now, has a variety of causes, and barring a spate of outright lawlessness, probably won't recede any time soon. Sorry to say, we can expect the rising generation to respect copyright laws about as much as their parents respect traffic laws, unless we can give them a reason to do otherwise.<br><br>A second issue is the law of unintended consequences, as applied to new technology. Certainly when record companies abandoned the old analog formats in favor of CDs, nobody was thinking that in a few short years, people would be able to read and write the files right there on their own personal computers, nor that in a few years more, vast numbers of people would have access to a world wide computer network controlled by no one single entity.<br><br>This is not going to be an easy problem to solve, but legislators, lobbyists, and citizens will need to remember that copyright laws exist (at least in theory) to encourage creation of new works and that doubling enforcement efforts will not result in anywhere close to twice as much benefit (the law of diminishing returns applies here with a vengence). Copyright laws that are unenforceable will do little to accomplish their reason for existing.<br><br>Finally, welcome to ZDNet. I look forward to seeing more articles from you over the coming months and years (but be prepared to argue with your readers).
    John L. Ries
    • RE: Have we raised a generation of pirates?

      @John L. Ries Today's generation don't respect the laws for the simple reason that our so-called "leaders" (CEO's, politicians, police officers, etc.) don' respect the laws themselves and are corrupt as hell.
      smulji
      • 55 RPM records

        @smulji
        I think there's more to it than that. As a culture, we have moved toward using law to modify behavior, as opposed to using it to restrain criminality. This is often cheered by people who think they are helping. But what they are really doing is destroying respect for the law.

        During the Carter Administration in the U.S., the government passed a nationwide 55-mph speed limit. This was supposed to save gasoline, promote safety, and make the birds sing.

        One day I was driving on a California Freeway and I realized that everyone was driving 65, including the Highway Patrolman, who was a co-conspirator with the rest of us in deciding that "55" was a stupid law and we would ignore it. We would drive 65, just like the signs all said the year before.

        In that instant I realized that I was witnessing a huge cultural change. Virtually every adult in the nation had simultaneously and independently come to the conclusion that laws could -- and sometimes should -- be ignored.

        If anything, things have gotten worse since. "55" may be gone, but the number of "eat your spinach" laws that have no business being laws has multiplied a hundredfold. People have an innate sense that "laws" are supposed to be about robbery and murder and stuff... not how you dispose of alkaline flashlight batteries. The more of that stuff gets passed, the more Respect For The Law declines.
        Robert Hahn
      • RE: Have we raised a generation of pirates?

        @- People ramble on about "respect for the law" without a clue about history. If you did a side-by-side comparison of our society today against the Prohibition times or during the Indian Wars, you would be shocked at how "law-abiding" we are today compared to the past.

        The other thing to consider is that law-breaking is tolerated much more when the underlying law is viewed as unjust. The extension of copyrights to beyond the practical life of the work was one of the first unjust acts. Then you add in the fact that copyrights are conglomerated into the hands of just a few corporate media giants, and that those corporations act as a cartel to control prices and restrain any viable competition. Finally, you sprinkle on the knowledge that these cartels used the advent of CDs and DVDs to jack up prices and reap enormous profits for years before consumers caught on to their schemes.

        It all adds up to a generation that breaks the law because they feel justified in doing so. It's obvious that corrupt politicians and courts are more interested in gathering up bribes than they are protecting the public interest, so matters must be taken in hand by the citizens themselves.
        terry flores
  • RE: Have we raised a generation of pirates?

    I started piracy when I was still youngh... Had about 2000 1.44 diskettes for Amiga 500 (still have em). Back then it was all from friends (for me, it was from my father, but I knew he got em from his friends who then were all about 25/30 age)

    Then I moved to 486/Pentium 133 and bought about 15 or so games instore. I remember getting Carmageddon 1, Civilization 1 and Tomb Raider 1 as my first games ever bought and they were AWESOME!

    A few years later, I'm guessing about the time the 3dfx cards started popping up (man the revelation that was playing a game in Glide for the first time ... biggest jaw dropping moment in gaming history... anyway, around that time one of my school friend's went to Holland to get something called "crazybytes" and "twilight" (no not the movie) cd's ... they were compilation cd's of cracked games and applications... think in the end I had about 40 of them...

    A tad later the internet happened (on 56k dailup) and my first ever website was "www.winamp.com" where I downloaded some skins and plugins at 3kb/sec :p But it was sooo worth it :)

    I remember I had some downloaded music mp3 cd's back then but not sure where they came from really. Must have been the internet .. can't think of anything else ...

    But it's with ADSL it all started.... For years and years and years and years and ... I downloaded pretty much every release the scene pushed out ... I had access to awesome distro ftp's .. was private member of a fxp board (dellusional-fxp) and filled hundreds and hundreds of cd's with burned iso's .... still got em at my old folks home ... not that they hold any real value anymore these days as well, if I want something old, I just torrent download it in an hour or so...

    Next on the radar were DVD's... For a brief while I compressed those 1000's of cd's on DVD compilations, usually of "a series" or "genre" .. I remember having one with all the railroad tycoons, one with all the age of empires/age of mythology, one with all the tomb raiders etc etc etc etc ..... made some nice covers for them as well and they were like the "ultimate collections"....

    It wasn't untill steam arrived (which I really really really hated at first, think I needed to install it for Half Life 2... ) and over time I "bought" a LOT of games on steam. Currently my steam account holds 714 games and is valued at 9741 USD. I even bought lots of old games that I once downloaded on cd's back then just for easy access :)

    I still download games today... a lot less though.. I still check nfohump.com almost daily to see what gets released but it's no more obscession to get it all... I just checked on my drive (since that dvd period I mentioned which is about 10/15 years ago now I just saved iso's on external HDD drives... haven't burned anything in a LONG time), anyway I checked my drive, and I see recently I downloaded Skyrim, NFS: The Run, Assassins Creed Revelations, Battlefield 3, Fifa 12 and Call Of Duty 8... which is really nothing compared to days of old where I downloaded sometimes up to 6 releases a day :)

    Since downloading those games I have bought Skyrim and Battlefield 3. CoD8 was just to much of a rehash and I only play Fifa 12 local against a friend, so I don't care about online play...

    On the application front, I must confess I never bought any Windows version legit... I used Windows 3.1, 95, 98, 98SE, ME (uck), XP, Vista and 7 so I'll probably get Win8 legit when it comes out hopefully next year... Actually I can't think of any app I bought ever .. I used Delphi, Photoshop, Office etc a lot but nope... to easy to just get it cracked I guess ... that and compared to games those cost a lot..

    Anyway, that's my piracy history from the late 80's to 2011... But you know what, nevertheless I pirated 1000's upon 1000's of software titles I don't feel like I did anything "bad"... I wouldn't have bought those in the first place and my steam account proves I do pay for good games when I got the money and all .. in the end I live only once, and pirating games or applications indeed is not going to get me to blink ....

    On that aspect, I'm owner of a gaming orientated cybercafe, so I still play a lot of games together with customers and all and none of em have any issues with piracy either (age 13-40). It IS baked in today's culture ... just two days ago, one of the customers brouht his 32gb usb stick for me to put the entire Sims 3 collection on because his mother asked for it .. if the parents (I'm also 30+) of today do not care, why would the children ?
    DJK2
    • RE: Have we raised a generation of pirates?

      @DJK2

      "But you know what, nevertheless I pirated 1000's upon 1000's of software titles I don't feel like I did anything "bad"..."

      And that's the problem with moral relativism. People end up thinking that morals are about "feeling bad," and the whole concept of morals gets thrown out the window.
      CobraA1
      • But conscience is where it starts

        @CobraA1
        Morality can and must be taught, but ultimately, it's our consciences that determine the sorts of moral principles we actually follow.
        John L. Ries
  • RE: Have we raised a generation of pirates?

    i dont think its a generational thing at all.

    it comes down to several issues there are probably other issues i forgot. each item you could have in depth discussions of each. i tried to keep my answers generalized as much as i felt comfrotable doing.

    1. music had blank cassettes/cd's. movies and tv had vhs/cd's/dvd's. and the movie and recording industry turned a blind eye and everyone made there own recordings. then comes the internet and napster blows the lid off the whole thing. themusic/movie/tv lost there control. instead of 20% doing recordings it became 90% (i have no hard figures just thru some number in to prove a point)

    2. perception is reality. it really doesnt matter what the law says untill your in front of the judge. but when i buy a movie or album it belongs to ME, not the artist not the industry. no one but me. and as long as i dont try and profit from it i can do what ever i want with it. thats what everyone thinks and feels.

    3. riaa suing there customer base WAS wrong, legal issues aside. you dont bite the hand that feeds you. there was a backlash and most people havent forgotten

    4. in general the music was getting less popular. people are tired of buying a 12 song album with only 3 good songs on it.

    this is why cable and satelite companys are worried!!! people want alecart choices for the tv. and its COMING, when the first one blinks the race is on. the industry doesnt want it and satelite and cable defiantely doesnt. BUT WE DO!

    5. hbo said it would never offer hbo go with out a cable/satelite subcription. come back to me in 5 years and lets see how that worked for them. i wonder how much they lost to people becasue there is no wy in hell they will get hbo just for game of thrones and beable to download it for free from a torrent site.

    i can only imagine how much moeny they have lost had they just offered up the 13 episodes for download at 20$
    dcox00
    • RE: Have we raised a generation of pirates?

      @dcox00 Honestly, I don't think there is nearly as much illegal downloading going on as you might think.

      Most people will pay for quality content and will not buy something that isn't.

      I do agree with the alecart options, there definitely needs to be more of them. For now a mix of Hulu, Netflix and the occasional iTunes/Amazon Video Purchase does make for a cable/satellite killer at a fraction of the cost.
      cmwade1977
    • RE: Have we raised a generation of pirates?

      @dcox00 -- On your final comment I completely agree, and I see that as the way forward. I was saying to someone the other day if only those cable companies offered their most popular shows to the world (at the same broadcast time as in the US) for a fee of $20, I'd be there with my money on day one.
      avoidz
  • RE: Have we raised a generation of pirates?

    i dont think its a generational thing at all.

    it comes down to several issues there are probably other issues i forgot. each item you could have in depth discussions of each. i tried to keep my answers generalized as much as i felt comfrotable doing.

    1. music had blank cassettes/cd's. movies and tv had vhs/cd's/dvd's. and the movie and recording industry turned a blind eye and everyone made there own recordings. then comes the internet and napster blows the lid off the whole thing. themusic/movie/tv lost there control. instead of 20% doing recordings it became 90% (i have no hard figures just thru some number in to prove a point)

    2. perception is reality. it really doesnt matter what the law says untill your in front of the judge. but when i buy a movie or album it belongs to ME, not the artist not the industry. no one but me. and as long as i dont try and profit from it i can do what ever i want with it. thats what everyone thinks and feels.

    3. riaa suing there customer base WAS wrong, legal issues aside. you dont bite the hand that feeds you. there was a backlash and most people havent forgotten

    4. in general the music was getting less popular. people are tired of buying a 12 song album with only 3 good songs on it.

    this is why cable and satelite companys are worried!!! people want alecart choices for the tv. and its COMING, when the first one blinks the race is on. the industry doesnt want it and satelite and cable defiantely doesnt. BUT WE DO!

    5. hbo said it would never offer hbo go with out a cable/satelite subcription. come back to me in 5 years and lets see how that worked for them. i wonder how much they lost to people becasue there is no wy in hell they will get hbo just for game of thrones and beable to download it for free from a torrent site.

    i can only imagine how much moeny they have lost had they just offered up the 13 episodes for download at 20$
    dcox00
    • RE: Have we raised a generation of pirates?

      @dcox00 As I remember it, making tapes of vinyl records killed the music industry back in the 1970s. It must be so, because they told us it was.

      I never heard of anyone taken to court for making mix tapes to listen to in their car, or even for recording songs from their friends. There was apparently a fall in record sales of two or three percent one year in the late 1970s. According to the record companies, that was due to people recording the songs on tape, and the deep recession, and (then) record unemployment at the time was supposedly not a factor.

      Now this industry, which presumably died in the 1970s, wages war on its customers, tries to criminalise them by paying for copyright laws that go beyond what most people not in that industry believe reasonable, and pretends surprise when people's own sense of morality does not lead them so much to act as the media companies wish them to do.

      Media companies claim that it is the artists who suffer if copyright is infringed. Often, it appears more often to be the media companies who collect rent on something they did not create, who would actually lose, if anyone did.

      IMHO it is morally right that writers, musicians and so on are recompensed adequately for producing entertainment which people enjoy. That includes recompense for people like editors, recording engineers, and payment for the costs of producing the media. Today, that recompense is obtained by means of royalty payments when media are sold, which may or may not be the very best way to achieve this, but which might continue to be workable and practical.

      What I don't consider reasonable or moral is for the media companies to charge monopoly prices, use their wealth to make copyright periods unreasonably long, and probably indefinitely extensible in the future, and pay many of the creators of the entertainment a low percentage of profit. The amount of copyright infringement reported suggests that comparable opinions are widely held, when people think of the issue at all.

      One say byproduct of the attitude engendered by the abusive actions of the media companies is that people's attitude toward copyright may respect the notion unreasonably little, when there is still a case to be made that people who produce entertainment that other people enjoy, and do so as a means to earn a living, should have an opportunity to do so. It would not surprise me if the average public attitude towards copyright is now more negative than a dispassionate analysis would deem reasonable. If so, it is in reaction to the abuses of the system by the media companies.
      Olorin_z
  • RE: Have we raised a generation of pirates?

    Advocates of such bill are fighting against the nature of the internet: even if the bill gets passed, it simply WON'T WORK because there are millions of other ways for online piracy to continue to thrive. What laws like this tries to protect is essentially stubborn corporations that choose remain in denial and refuse to revamp their business models in order to adapt to change in the real world. The end result is further encroachment upon people's rights to civil liberty and no one will end up benefiting from it except for companies selling tracking and surveillance technologies.
    settinghead
  • RE: Have we raised a generation of pirates?

    The issue is greater than piracy. We live in amoral society. I think Francis Schaeffer (to paraphrase) ask a young person today to be good you probably get a blank stare. This was round the 1970's. I was raised in the 1960's if anything I remember though shall not steal. In the in the 1970's my generation, the bloomers brought forward the concept of situational ethnics. With our contribution of situational ethics, add a good dose of narcissism and entitlement and top it off with isolation to their own peers leading to immaturity and we get the pirate of toady.
    Richardbz