Pre-release Windows 7 needs feature switch mode

Pre-release Windows 7 needs feature switch mode

Summary: I have a dream that one day, little boys and little girls, across this great plain of society, can open up a pre-release version of Windows 7 or Windows 8, and have access to full unstable features which makes them go "oooh" and "ahhh" in excitement, wonder and amazement.

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I have a dream that one day, little boys and little girls, across this great plain of society, can open up a pre-release version of Windows 7 or Windows 8, and have access to full unstable features which makes them go "oooh" and "ahhh" in excitement, wonder and amazement.

It took only a few days for the world renown Rafael Rivera to create a "Blue Badge" application which opened up the inner sanctum of Windows 7, revealing some rather cool features which were previously held back by the Gestapo of Redmond. I knew that Microsoft were going to hold back some features some hours before the Windows 7 embargo was lifted, restricting these to those on the internal Microsoft network using a "phone home" strategy.

I thought this was unfair, as did one of my friends who works on the Windows 7 team:

"Yeah, I think the whole thing is stupid, but I don't write the disclosure policy. It's a pain in our ass when working with enterprise customers."

I propose a simple, easy to introduce policy. When releasing a pre-release version of an operating system, like Windows 7 in this case, simply bundle a small application like Rivera's "Blue Badge" application into it, with a reverse function.

  • Windows 7 Stable Mode: allowing features like Aero Shake, the new styled taskbar and certain touch features to be held back and hidden, so that the overall stability of the operating system is safe, secure and won't crash as much. Ideal for developers and those who want to try out compatibility and applications on the new platform.
  • Windows 7 Unstable Mode: a clear disclaimer given saying things might not work correctly, but opens up all the features that are less tested, not finished and more likely to screw up. Ideal for those who like to play with new things, young people who like eye-candy and developers testing new user interface interactions.

I don't see what harm Microsoft could get from this, however I can see why they are currently holding back. With the "disaster" of Vista, they want to make sure there's a big bang for when Windows 7 hits the shelves. They want everything to work and nothing to be left out because of time, money or plain energy.

hottrack1.gif

I mean, I ended up spending a good 10 minutes just hovering over these icons, watching the hot track behind it light up to the colour of the icon.

hottrack2.gif

And of course there's a more "Vista-esque" legacy setting; keeping the new stuff in there but making it a bit more older-person friendly. Personally I like this setting more, but then again, I don't particularly like change. And finally, a setting which I have much enjoyed so far; After using DreamScene on my Vista Ultimate laptop for some time now, I quite like having a moving wallpaper; especially the leaves on the tree one, considering it is autumn time after all.

All these and more will be opened up with the "Blue Badge" patch, but I just don't see why Microsoft doesn't integrate this part of the operating system. T'is rhubarb.

Topics: Windows, Microsoft, Operating Systems, Software

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22 comments
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  • Your problem appears to be that it was NOT released

    to the public and people like yourself. This isn't even a beta and there is no way to determine what will or will not happen when it goes RTM.

    Of course your use of gestapo pretty much tells everyone you have zero intention of doing anything other than ranting uselessly. Carry on, we understand your deep need to do so...
    No_Ax_to_Grind
  • Damned if they do .....

    ... damned if they don't. They are probably a little sensative of showing bugs after Vista. it is purely a marketing decision, nothing more.
    ShadeTree
  • RE: Pre-release Windows 7 needs feature switch mode

    Well like vista its will be a nightmare .....
    Just like Vista it will be a mediocre product .... Dont hold your breath until it work perfectly you will turn blue ... IN the end its microsoft what do you expect from dont idiot
    Quebec-french
    • I'll take that bet Frenchie....

      And I don't know what would we expect from you?
      TheBottomLineIsAllThatMatters
  • What a Silly Blog Post

    [i][b]I don't see what harm Microsoft could get from this, however I can see why they are currently holding back.[/b][/i]

    How about the harm done to Vista because they removed features that were later decided to not be beneficial.

    People still cry about Vista not having WinFS... even though they can't articulate why they want it (sure they can recite it's purpose but not why they want it)... they simply cry because it was promised to them and then got pulled.

    It is very much in Microsoft's interest to NOT over promise.

    It was very very smart of Microsoft to learn its lesson and not release too much... there are too many people out there ready to foist ill-will onto Microsoft the first chance they get.

    The longer Microsoft can postpone that drubbing the more chance the public will get to see Win7 for itself to make up it's own opinion instead of having it made for them by the echo chamber of the ABM tech bloggers.

    Heck, it is already being done by that sorry excuse of an "article" by InfoWorld trying to say Win7 is just a lame version of Vista.

    There is a reason Microsoft released pre-beta Windows 7 Milestone 3 at the PDC... because it was feature complete of the developers API. This release was intended only for developers to develop against. Nothing more. Why should Microsoft needlessly open itself up to undue criticism?
    mikefarinha
  • RE: Pre-release Windows 7 needs feature switch mode

    [quote]
    Windows 7 Unstable Mode: a clear disclaimer given saying things might not work correctly, but opens up all the features that are less tested, not finished and more likely to screw up.
    [/quote]

    Do you really believe an anti MS blog/site won't switch this on and then rant about "yet another MS crap release"? Anyone looking for half a chance to choose another OS will ignore any comments MS make about the unstable mode being switched on.
    SamYeager
  • REMEMBER VISTA BETA?!?!!

    Most of Vista's downfall were users getting ahold of Beta's passing them around, claiming it was unstable and vista sucked.

    Most of those claims were and are still unfounded and a higher percentage of those that use Vista have less issues then the percentage of those bought the latest update of OSX.


    They are keeping this close because they dont want knuckleheads (usually macophiles) doing the same thing again!
    JABBER_WOLF
  • Why do you care if useless "pretty" stuff is left out?

    What matters isn't the skin, it's the OS itself. If you want to look at pretty colors go buy a picture book, not a computer.
    AzuMao
    • Re: Why do you care if useless "pretty" stuff is left out?

      Surely nobody can be so naive to think that the skin isn't important.

      If it wasn't, would Apple sell any Macs or Iphones?

      To the end-user, the user interface - the "pretty" stuff as you call it, is highly important. It affects how user-friendly and intuitive the operating system is perceived to be, how technologically advanced the operating system is perceived to be, and more. The users shouldn't need to know or care about how it works underneath; it is the skin - the GUI - that they interact with.
      mmj@...
      • There's pretty, and then there is AERO.

        There's niceties that make things easier for the user to interact, and then there are shiny things that do nothing other than get a 'Wow' the first few times they are used and then proceed to get in the way for the rest of the life of the installation.

        Many components of Aero fit into the latter.
        dellpj@...
      • call me naive

        I may still be using XP for a while, but I disabled all of the performance hindering eye candy. When I ever upgrade to the next Windows OS (asuming it is Windows), I'll disable all the performance hindering eye candy.

        I want "go", not "show".
        cwallen19803@...
      • Differing priorities I guess.

        Personally, all I care is that it's fast, secure, stable, convenient to use, and runs everything I want to run on it.

        I mean sure it wouldn't hurt if they made it all pretty and stuff (as long as it didn't slow it down) but they must have a good reason not to or they would have, so I'm curious why he is complaining about it.

        As for Macs and iPhones, I wouldn't know. Their GUIs don't look any better then Aero or Beryl IMHO.
        AzuMao
    • I'm really hoping...

      That they just simply devote a whole lot less time to the pretty shiny stuff that I'm going to have to turn off for performance reasons in my 1000+ user base.
      dellpj@...
      • RE: I'm really hoping...

        It's funny that - I've noticed a great improvement in the DWM and the UI tweaks than Vista. I dual boot Vista SP2 (beta) with Windows 7 6933, and W7 runs so much faster, smoother and it's easier to use.

        Memory consumption is down, disk "spinning" has reduced and it's wayyy faster transferring things over the network. I can't complain actually.
        zwhittaker
        • Did you mean DRM?

          DWM is a basic part of most *nix systems, since at least a decade ago.
          AzuMao
  • RE: Pre-release Windows 7 needs feature switch mode

    Interesting, if inconsequential, how a complaint about one
    company's policy manages to get some lambasting another
    company, especially when the latter company goes out of its
    way to avoid pre-release hype.

    The skin deepness lies not with that company or the OS it
    sells, but with some contributor's affectation at being
    relevant, balanced or well informed.
    Mediamigos
  • "Unstable mode" would be a great idea.

    Most of the bugs that get out are because internal testing doesn't stress enough different systems, or stress them in the areas that many users would do so.

    Having a public "unstable mode" with bug feedback would be boatloads better than just hiding the unstable features in an internal closet till rollout.

    MS would be protected from yelling and complaints because they would tell you up front that the features are unstable, and the unlocker could be placed firmly under IT control.
    D. W. Bierbaum
  • Plain Ignorant

    The "Gestapo of Redmond"??
    Do you think that its cool to associate Microsoft or any other corporation with the Nazis?
    Read your history - the Nazi's were responsible for mass murder, genoside and unspeakable acts of evil during the 30's and then the second world war. Ask your grand parents (who probably lived through that war) if they think you are cool for using such associations.
    jaredtt
    • why not?

      Killing civilian, invading another country, torturing prisoner of war and many other evil acts.

      And i am talking about G. Bush Jr.

      So, what is the difference between it and the nazis?. is the amount of people killed really care?.

      I don't like nazi, neither any military force.
      magallanes
      • why not?

        Funny that, last time I checked, George W Bush was a lame-duck president, not a Microsoft employee.
        jaredtt