Will the Windows App Store entice Apple's defecting developers?

Will the Windows App Store entice Apple's defecting developers?

Summary: Microsoft plans to launch their own 'app store' for computers in late February. How do they plan to entice developers?

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TOPICS: Windows, Microsoft
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Earlier this month, Microsoft began its attempt to lure and entice potential future developers in preparation for the opening of its long-awaited Windows Store.

Planning a late February launch, the technology giant wants to open its first application store for computers at the same time releasing its the next-generation Windows 8 operating system for public testing.

(Source: Flickr)

At a preview of the store in San Francisco, Windows Web Services vice-president Antoine Leblond said: "I think we are going to do great. The reach of Windows is absolutely huge and can't be matched."

Windows powers more than half a billion computers globally. But Microsoft is likely to have a hard time taking on heavyweights in the applications market, such as Google and Apple, and it may be a while before they acquire a contending percentage of the application market share.

The potential for customers is staggering when you consider how many people use Windows operating systems. When Windows 8 appears, Microsoft will have an estimated double the user base that iOS and Android currently own.

In the smartphone and tablet market, however, Microsoft is no contender for dominance. At least, currently.

There are several rather large incentives for developers to consider working with the new Microsoft platform.

The Android market allows anyone to set themselves up, but getting due recognition can be a difficult task.

In comparison, the Apple App Store is heavily monitored and packs a host of rules and regulations. With Microsoft's potential larger user base and transparent admission rules, it may become an attractive prospect.

A major feature that may seriously influence developers to abandon Apple application development is the proposed payment options set in place for potential Microsoft developers.

Where iProduct application transactions have to be processed and regulated via Apple in-house -- who takes 30 percent of any revenue generated by the applications -- the Windows Store platform will allow developers to have greater freedom in payment methods.

The Windows Store will allow developers to set their own prices, and support free applications that generate revenue through advertising. The price range permitted for apps will be between $1.49 and $999.99.

The revenue model that Microsoft plans to implement is a strong incentive and perhaps fairer version of what Apple currently offers its developer community.

Offering the same ratio as Apple -- a 70:30 split with the minority share going to Cupertino directly, after selling $25,000 worth of an application, the developer's share will increase to 80:20. Developers will also keep the full amount from in-application transactions.

The Windows Store will only host free applications when it first launches in February.

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Topics: Windows, Microsoft

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18 comments
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  • My definition of a fair split is ... 99.9 and 0.1

    NT
    jacksonjohn
    • RE: Will the Windows App Store entice Apple's defecting developers?

      @johnfenjackson@??? they could always just offer the app for free, and charge the end user for content. ;)
      Rick_Kl
    • You're right

      @johnfenjackson@...

      You could box your product and sell it on the store shelves. Of course you'd have to pay to package it. You'd have to pay to advertise it. You'd have to pay for distribution to the stores. The stores themselves would get a cut.

      I know a lot of people think 70/30 or 80/20 seems unfair but it's more than vendors got under traditional brick and mortar approaches to application sales.
      LiquidLearner
    • Why don't you want developers getting 30%

      @johnfenjackson@...
      as oppossed to just .1%?
      John Zern
  • RE: Will the Windows App Store entice Apple's defecting developers?

    You forgot to mention one very unique aspect of the Window Application Store: the painless "Trial Version" model which is a blessing for both developers and consumers.
    TheCyberKnight
    • RE: Will the Windows App Store entice Apple's defecting developers?

      @TheCyberKnight .. On the flip side of things, Apple gets to double and triple count the number of applications in their store for each separate 'trial' or 'lite' version because there is no 'trial mode'.
      gomigomijunk
    • RE: Will the Windows App Store entice Apple's defecting developers?

      @TheCyberKnight - I agree - the ability to trial Windows Phone apps has proven to be exceptionally useful. I curse every time I use my iPad and have to search the AppStore for an app that might (but more often doesn't) suit my needs.
      bitcrazed
  • Developers follow the money. Period.

    If the Windows Store proves to be profitable, Windows developers will follow.

    The rest of your argument is rather unconvincing. For example:
    <i>"The Windows Store will allow developers to set their own prices, and support free applications that generate revenue through advertising. The price range permitted for apps will be between $1.49 and $999.99."</i>

    How is this any different than the Android Market, the App Sore or any other download store (except the Amazon Appstore that has some weird pricing rules).

    <i>"In comparison, the Apple App Store is heavily monitored and packs a host of rules and regulations."</i>

    So is the WP Marketplace. I suspect so will the Windows Store.

    Why not concentrate on what will attract users to the Windows Store like the trials and other aspects?
    Bruizer
  • RE: Will the Windows App Store entice Apple's defecting developers?

    I would have liked to have read more about "Apple's defecting developers" Perhaps the title should have been "Will the Windows App Store entice Apple's Developers to Defect"?
    YaBaby
    • RE: Will the Windows App Store entice Apple's defecting developers?

      @YaBaby <br>Defect is such a link-baiting word, implying developers for Macs are stuck in some repressive regime. When jumping over the wall is mapping Objective-C source to C#, it hardly seems to be the stuff of a John LaCare novel.<br><br>Which is a tip. This is not about taking developers out of the Apple ecosystem, but giving an App Store to the folks who are in the Microsoft fold and may be quite interested in delegating their online presence to Microsoft for a 30 then 20 pct. cut.<br><br>Microsoft thinking about poaching Cocoa developers would be evidenced by putting Objective-C on the CLR and into Visual Studio.
      DannyO_0x98
  • It's a cookie cutter world after all

    MS bringing new meaning to the phrase "pulling up the rear."

    Shaka
    klumper
    • Oftentimes, in a horse race, it's not the horse that is in the lead,

      that wins in the end.

      Microsoft has been a trailing horse a few times in the past, only to eventually take the lead and not relinquish it ever again. It's bound to happen again in the smartphones and tablets arenas, and in the apps stores.
      adornoe
      • And, as has happened many times in the past ...

        I won't hold my breath.
        klumper
      • klumper: You can hold your breath, or not, but it won't matter,

        and Microsoft has had a history of catching up and taking the lead where it matters most, and the mobile markets matter a lot.
        adornoe
      • Ah yes

        Copying + marketing, as opposed to innovating, can have its rewards.

        Like I said, it's a cookie cutter world. ;)
        klumper
      • klumper: Get real

        Innovation?

        There's more of that happening at Microsoft than at Apple and Google combined; you just don't see or hear of it, because, it's not all about the gimmicky new gadgets which the regular consumer gets to download news apps into. To people like you, innovation is about the latest version of a smartphone or a tablet. Life and business is about a lot more than the simple-minded thoughts of those who are mostly into gimmicks and gadgets.

        When it comes to copying, in today's world, everybody does it, and it's copying happens at Google and Apple and Microsoft. But, Microsoft has a lot more to be copied by the others. So, which one of their products can be called original thoughts or innovations at Apple or Google? What they've done in the last several years, had already been done in the past. Some might be doing it better than the others, but original thinking is not in the picture.
        adornoe
      • Some just do it better - and a whole lot more - than others

        @adornoe@... <br>[i]When it comes to copying, in today's world, everybody does it, and it's copying happens at Google and Apple and Microsoft. [/i]<br><br>Just ask Microsoft.
        klumper
  • great

    really great and use full sharing, i really like it and i am going to share it on my fb
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    razia1230