BlackBerry-Motorola patent infringement fight makes little sense to me

BlackBerry-Motorola patent infringement fight makes little sense to me

Summary: Just within the last few days, BlackBerry-maker Research In Motion and Motorola have sued each other for Patent infringement.Motorola's big issue seems to be a feeling that in most of its 8xxx series models, RIM's method of storing contact info in wireless emails, and its ability to recognize incoming phone numbers are tantamount to infringement.

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Just within the last few days, BlackBerry-maker Research In Motion and Motorola have sued each other for Patent uspto-seal.jpg infringement.

Motorola's big issue seems to be a feeling that in most of its 8xxx series models, RIM's method of storing contact info in wireless emails, and its ability to recognize incoming phone numbers are tantamount to infringement.

RIM fired back, accusing, by implication, Motorola's Q email phone of offering thumb keyboards awfully similar to several BlackBerry models.

RIM also says that Motorola's patent royalty fee structure is "exorbitant."

I have to tell you that some of the capabilities each company is suing each other about seem rather established, and yes, generic to me.

Hate to use the "t" (as in troll) word, but this really sounds like a neh-neh fight you sometimes see in and around sandboxes.

What do you think?

Topics: Mobility, Collaboration, Hardware, Networking, BlackBerry, Telcos, Wi-Fi

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  • If that's the case...

    Then Toshiba should sue LG for putting the power button to their TV's on the right side of the cabinet. Or Ford should sue Daiwoo for placing their doorhandles where they are most convenient.. on the door. Pure rubbish for a keyboard/pad layout to be considered a patentable idea. As for the way RIM stores their contact information, unless they are using some compression/decompression algorithm that is a variation of a *patented* design or some other means that is blatantly overstepping the line of infringment, there shouldn't be any problem. I just hope my coworker doesn't sue because I placed my monitor/phone/notepad in the same layout on my desk as he has his.
    Salty Dog