Safari for Windows main problem? Mac cultists

Safari for Windows main problem? Mac cultists

Summary: I believe a key reason why Apple released Safari for Windows is that with Safari as the browser on iPhone, Apple wanted to introduce as many Windows users to Safari as possible.It is in Apple's interest to have as many prospective iPhone buyers comfortable with the browser.

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I believe a key reason why Apple released Safari for Windows is that with Safari as the browser on iPhone, Apple wanted to introduce as many Windows users to Safari as possible.

It is in Apple's interest to have as many prospective iPhone buyers comfortable with the browser. After all, the $599 sticker price, when combined with a sense of unfamiliarity with the iPhone's built-in browser, may cause hesitation among at least some of the teeming milions who come to the iPhone proposition as non-Safari, Windows users.

Om gets it:

When the iPhone launches, there is going to be huge crush of curious onlookers who while may not buy an iPhone, are likely to idle over to the Macs and find something familiar, thus making them overcome their fear of switching.

I'm surprised how few other bloggers get this. Some think AT&T, which does have a voice as iPhone's exclusive U.S. carrier, is yanking Apple's chain.

Then, there are the alarmists. Ever since the release, the "insecurity" of Safari's Windows offering has been a common meme in the blogosphere. Application termination, cross-site scripting, arbitrary code vulnerabilities on nasty sites. Those security "issues," which were no worse than your periodic IE problems, have largely been fixed by an incremental rev.

Not that these security questions should not have been pointed out, but I sensed a certain glee in this piling on.

I suspect the real reason for this derision about Safari for Windows is the pathological hatred of Microsoft among the Mac cultists. Anything Apple does that is seen as some sort of accomodation to Windows users earns stated hostility from some Mac cultists, and unstated hostility from many more.

Mac cultists really believe they are superior technobeings to Windows users.

Mac cultists believe that little if any good comes from Windows.

Mac cultists also believe that Microsoft is evil, and that any accomodation with the company or its Windows OS is a surrender. And if AT&T can be derided as the agent of surrender, the corrupter of their beloved Apple, then doing so helps spread out the blame.

[poll id=77]

Topics: Apple, Hardware, iPhone, Mobility, Windows

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6 comments
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  • Safari For Windows is:

    Pointless. I use Opera.

    Why would I want to drive a Ford when I have a Ferrari?!?
    Scrat
  • Safari for Windows:

    Is beautiful...when it works.

    Hopefully the final release will be out soon.
    varun_prasad9
  • Different Key Reason

    Quote: [i]I believe a key reason why Apple released Safari for Windows is that with Safari as the browser on iPhone, Apple wanted to introduce as many Windows users to Safari as possible.[/I]

    I don't believe this to be such a key reason. A browser is a browser. You enter a web address, click on links, and hit back and forward. Anyone used to internet explorer, firefox, or opera would be able to use safari fine.

    I believe the key reason for putting Safari on Windows is to allow windows web developers to easily test and make their websites compatible with it, making safari more compatible with more websites, therefore making the Mac/iPhone a more attractive platform for painlessly browsing the internet. This is especially important given that Apple hopes for a lot of iPhone Web 2.0 application support. Right now Safari support for a lot of javascript/ajax heavy websites is problematic (I, as a web developer am a culprit of this myself). Now that testing on Safari is easy for all, there's no excuse! If Safari gains marketshare after this windows release (perhaps doubtful), this effect will be even stronger.
    ross2000
  • Could Apple be Going Google Here?

    I'm wondering if perhaps the inverse of your point here is the case: that Apple is trying to leverage the built-in buzz over its hardware (iPhone) to expose people to its software/services? Safari on PCs will result in apps that run happily on PCs, Macs, and iPhones -- more market share for further extensions/partnerships on the services side, less pressure to buy Apple hardware. Thanks for the post; my own ramblings here: http://www.itbusinessedge.com/blogs/bpi/?p=498
    KenHardin
  • It's the 'Services' stupid

    Everyone knows Microsoft isn't going to play nice with Apple. So Apple has to give
    Windows users a consistent experience not just with the browser experience on the
    iPhone but also with Apple's suite of applications that companies will be rolling out
    as soon as Leopard services are released.

    As some ZDNet bloggers have commented: 'what's the big deal with another
    browser on Windows?'. The question is a good one, but they're missing the point.
    They're assuming that IE will do everything anyone on Windows will ever want to
    do. That's not the case. In fact, Steve Jobs is so obvious in his keynote, that it's a
    wonder how you ZDNet pundits miss the subtleties. Steve Jobs says that there's a
    distribution vector already in place for Safari for Windows known as iTunes.
    Microsoft doesn't play nice with iTunes either, but that doesn't matter because
    people have chosen iTunes over Microsoft's wishes. Now Apple has to extend other
    services to Windows users and again Microsoft isn't going to cooperate. No
    problem. Apple will Windows users 'yet another browser' that will play nice with
    their services.

    So the secret to Safari for Windows is in one word: Service
    YinToYourYang-22527499
  • Missing the point

    Yet another browser that is web standards compliant. Guess who the odd man out is?
    Firefox, Opera, Safari, etc. etc. etc. It is the sum of the whole. If 30% of the market
    gets taken by web comliant browsers there is a greater incentive for developers to
    write their apps for those browsers. Apple doesn't have to beat anyone they just have
    to contribute to the whole.
    SquishyParts