Sorry, Google Phone hopefuls: someone else has already applied for GPhone trademark

Sorry, Google Phone hopefuls: someone else has already applied for GPhone trademark

Summary:  Based on reports originating in India, the blogosphere and the Diggosphere are revving up a Meme about the arrival of the "Google Phone" in a couple of weeks. The presumed name: "GPhone.

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TOPICS: Google, Mobility
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gphonetrademarkapp.jpg 

Based on reports originating in India, the blogosphere and the Diggosphere are revving up a Meme about the arrival of the "Google Phone" in a couple of weeks. The presumed name: "GPhone."

But I don't think so.  Google is fastidious about securing trademarks for products and services it releases. If they were to be planning a GPhone, you'd think they'd have the Trademark thing covered.

They don't.

I'm just back from a search on the Trademark section of the U.S. Patent & Trademark Office.

Hey, guess what. As you see at the top of this post, Micro-g LaCoste, Inc., a company in Lafayette, Colorado, has applied back on March 5 of this year for a GPhone trademark that would represent:

An accelerometer employed as a gravity meter for use in full bandwidth monitoring of ground motion related to earthquakes, volcanology, tectonic movements, aquifers, hydrocarbon and groundwater reservoirs, glacial rebound, glacier studies, earth tides, long period seismicity, and for geologic mapping and other geoscientific applications.

Doesn't sound like a GPhone to me.

Please understand, though, that the Trademark has not yet been granted. As you can see by clicking here, the GPhone trademark application will be "published for opposition" on September 11. It is at that time that others who have a problem with the applied-for trademark will be able to register their objections.

I wonder if Google will weigh in then.

One more thing, just in case you are wondering... there's no "Google Phone" trademark app on file.

Topics: Google, Mobility

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5 comments
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  • So?

    Infogear (now part of Cisco) held the IPhone trademark for a decade and a half before Apple released the iPhone. Just because there's a trademark out there, doesn't mean that the product's not going to happen now. You think Google would let something small like this keep them from releasing a phone?
    TheyCallMeGeorge@...
    • Not from releasing it...

      This won't affect the release of the phone, but it may affect the name of the phone, as the poster indicated. Come on, give the man a little credit. And you could read a little closer. :)
      laura.b
  • StareClips.com

    The thing is, that other "gPhone" is not a cell phone by any stretch of the imagination. As a result, Google may still be able to call their phone (if such one exists) a gPhone. Patent protection just protects confusion in similar products. As long as they can prove the products are not in direct competition, they can technically use the name (unless it can be proven it would cause confusion among consumers.)
    umopapisdn
  • They're not owned by Cisco, are they?

    Cisco could be squatting on trademarkable names.
    YinToYourYang-22527499
  • no tmark problem

    Google can likely succeed with its federal registration of Gphone despite the other company's prior use of that name. The two companies are using it differently in commerce. There is no overlap. Hence, customer's are not likely to be confused by the source of the product. If a dispute occurs, lawyers on Google?s side (if Google is the plaintiff) will try to argue that the other name ?dilutes? Google?s Gphone. However, the other company is first in line. Also, Gphone isn't yet "famous" (so far still undefined by Congress), but we know that won't take more than 5 minutes, considering Google's name. In summation, regarding strict trademark conversation, Google can go ahead and use and register the name. This company's different use, i.e., different international class status, will probably not inhibit Gphone branding by Google.
    Kathleen G. Williamson, Esq.
    www.williamsonandyoung.com
    katwillie2@...