Beware: Google's big, bad privacy risks

Beware: Google's big, bad privacy risks

Summary: Beware: Google's Big Bad Privacy Risks

SHARE:
TOPICS: Google
2

Once again, Google's (lack of a meaningful) privacy policy is prime "news" fodder.

For serious analytical debate over what a Google world really implies for the world's citizens? NO.

Remember when Google CEO Eric Schmidt sent "Big Brother" shockwaves throughout the blogosphere? It seems like yesterday (it almost was).

Schmidt's reveries of a not quite real super personalized Google search yielded the likes of: "Does Eric Schmidt want to sniff the armpits of my mind?" courtesy of Andrew Keen.

YES, the "elevated" headline is offered from the very Keen that rallies against "amateur hour," at least in plugging his new book. 

The latest Google privacy "flap" to gain big (not so serious) press is over Google Street View, the Amazon A9 "Block View" knock off.

SEE: Did Google really trump Amazon?

What issue is of primordial concern now?

"For Mary Kalin-Casey, it was never about her cat," the New York Times assures us, under the posed photo of the proud owner of "Monty."

The NYT professionaly produced photo of (not the real) record is a large, smashing close-up portrait of Kalin-Casy snuggling cat Monty by a sunfilled window overlooking a serene looking homeown American street.

The accusatory Google Street View "evidence," on the other hand is dark and ominous. So dark, in fact that nothing is discernable, certainly not the "indictment" worthy "zoom" of "Monty, her cat, sitting on a perch in the living room window of her second-floor apartment," that the NYT writes of.

Perhaps that is why Kalin-Casy actually made her case to the sometimes "blog of record," BoingBoing, rather than the touted "newspaper of record."

The Google reaction? As I predicted upon the launch of Google's "Street View", the Google position is the same that Amazon's A9 "Block View" position was:

It allows users to request that a photo be removed for privacy reasons, but the company had received few such requests.

Talk of smelly armpits and cuddly cats may be fun, for some.

The REAL Google big, bad privacy RISKS, however, are alive and well and impacting the world and its citizens 24/7, as I have been documenting and analyzing in depth.

CONCERNED ABOUT THE REAL GOOGLE PRIVACY RISKS? READ ON:

Google: $3.1 billion DoubleClick date with the FTC? Why Facebook is scarier than Google Google plays mind games with personal search Why Google CEO is ‘harmless’ Beware: Google is NOT your privacy friend Google zeal breeds more identity theft risks Google user data cloud: Do you trust it?  Google vs. Google on privacy, or not  Google plots server farm land grab in Europe  Google, YouTube double down on user tracking: DoubleClick next up  Google scary now? Personal Health Records, sponsored by Google, next and Google Analytics: Should Google be minding YOUR Web business?

Topic: Google

Kick off your day with ZDNet's daily email newsletter. It's the freshest tech news and opinion, served hot. Get it.

Talkback

2 comments
Log in or register to join the discussion
  • Just a proposal for a new Google service

    See my small cartoon:
    http://geekandpoke.typepad.com/geekandpoke/2007/06/google_home.html

    Bye,
    Oliver
    owidder
  • Google is so 20th century.....here is the real 21st century.

    3 years from now.....
    Everyone will be walking down the street with their miniature, Bluetooth camera lens embedded in their clothing (front and rear), which streams everything it/you see to your WiFi cell phone.
    Your WiFi cell phone will store everything on its 1 terabyte hard drive while at the same time streaming this video you see via WiFi to a ?tracker network?. The tracker network is a social group of similar people ( by geographical area,interest..etc),numbering from 2 or 3 to tens of thousands in size. All of these tracker networks will include retail facial recognition software that will be 10 times more powerful than anything currently available.
    The TrackerNetwork facial software works by taking every face that is inputted into its database and giving it a unique number.
    Then the face is identified in two ways.
    1. The TrackerNetwork facial software has so many thousands of ?hits? on any face over a period of day/weeks it identifies where this person starts his/her day, works, shops etc. It does this all automatically without knowing who the person is.
    2. People who belong to the TrackerNetwork input faces and identify them by name.

    With the above two, anyone belonging to the TrackerNetwork can track just about anyone by belonging to a network from that city. Just input the name ( or unique ID the TrackerNetwork software assigns to an individual) and the software will either allow you to watch them live or can show you history from as far back as recorded on that individual.

    The upside:
    Modern Neighbor Hood Watch: Hit and run? captured on numerous cell phones, instantly uploaded to a tracker network and within seconds the car and driver are identified and sent to the police.

    You are walking down the street, a drug addict asks you for money and when you refuse, he starts to get violent. Picked up by someone watching from a store, driving by in a car and from the person waiting for the bus ? a block away. Instantly sent to a tracker network.

    The downside:
    Anyone can track anyone all the time! You can track: politicians, celebrities, neighbors, spouse......etc.
    rcarbert