'Project Max' is now officially closed

'Project Max' is now officially closed

Summary: "The Max Project has concluded." With that simple statement, Microsoft's Max team announced that it is done with beta testing Max, its photo-sharing application that was designed to showcase Windows Presentation Foundation (WPF) and Windows Communication Foundation (WCF).

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TOPICS: Windows
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"The Max Project has concluded."

With that simple statement, Microsoft's Max team announced that it is done with beta testing Max, its photo-sharing application that was designed to showcase Windows Presentation Foundation (WPF) and Windows Communication Foundation (WCF).

"Thank you for participating in the beta of Microsoft Codename Max," read a note posted to the Max site on October 31. "Over the past year, you’ve sent us tons of fantastic feedback that we’ve incorporated not only into Max, but into the platform layer with the Windows Presentation Foundation (WPF) and the Windows Communication Foundation (WCF).

"Starting today, we will be disabling all downloads from our website. In the next week, we will be shutting down the Max services and our team forums. At that time, you will no longer be able to sign in to Max or share lists of photos with your friends. You will still be able to read news and browse the lists you’ve already shared and received," the note continued.

The Max team hinted that Max will be productized as one or more Windows Live services in the future. Some of the Max work also has become part of the .Net Framework 3.0 core, according to the team.

Max, which got its start in Microsoft Research, was known early in its brief life as "Project M." In late September 2006, Microsoft added a desktop RSS feed reader to the Max beta.

I take this development as yet another sign that Windows Vista and the .Net Framework 3.0 are on the cusp of RTMing.

Topic: Windows

About

Mary Jo has covered the tech industry for 30 years for a variety of publications and Web sites, and is a frequent guest on radio, TV and podcasts, speaking about all things Microsoft-related. She is the author of Microsoft 2.0: How Microsoft plans to stay relevant in the post-Gates era (John Wiley & Sons, 2008).

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