Best Buy memo details Microsoft Win 7 upgrade program, upgrade pricing

Best Buy memo details Microsoft Win 7 upgrade program, upgrade pricing

Summary: Microsoft officials may not be ready to share the date of the Vista-to-Windows 7 upgrade program they preannounced this week. But Best Buy is.

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Microsoft officials may not be ready to share the date of the Vista-to-Windows 7 upgrade program they preannounced this week. But Best Buy is.

A Best Buy memo obtained by Engadget has the details of the program, as well as the start date. As the tech enthusiast site TechARP reported earlier this year, the program will kick off on June 26.

Customers who buy Vista PCs between June 26 and the Windows 7 launch day (October 22) will get a free upgrade copy of Windows 7, according to the memo.

But wait: There's more. Starting June 26 there also will be a presell program kicking off at Best Buy, via which Windows 7 Home Premium Upgrade copies can be ordered for $49.95 and Windows 7 Professional Upgrade copies for $99.99. (Note: These are upgrade license prices, not the price for a brand-new retail version of Windows 7. Microsoft still hasn't released officially any Windows 7 price lists. )

Microsoft also confirmed the company is taking pre-orders from its volume licensees for WIndows 7, but wouldn't confirm that they are allegedly charging them $77 per copy for their Windows 7 upgrades.

What do you think of these upgrade prices? Cheap enough to entice you to move to Windows 7?

Topics: Operating Systems, Microsoft, Software, Windows

About

Mary Jo has covered the tech industry for 30 years for a variety of publications and Web sites, and is a frequent guest on radio, TV and podcasts, speaking about all things Microsoft-related. She is the author of Microsoft 2.0: How Microsoft plans to stay relevant in the post-Gates era (John Wiley & Sons, 2008).

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143 comments
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  • Fool me once .....

    Fool me twice.
    Fool me three times.
    Fool me four times.
    But fool me five times and I must be a hapless Microsoft consumer.
    fr0thy2
    • Or...

      ...perhaps you don't consider yourself hapless or "fool"'ed at all as you are completely happy with the computing experience you've had for many years not worrying so much about what operating system you use or the company it comes from.

      Perhaps it is just unfortunate and sad that some people can't get through their impossibly thick skulls that Windows is simply a product sold by a company in Washington. Many people use it and most don't care about an alternative. The majority don't know even care that an alternative exists.

      And at the end of the day, that's it.

      That's all there really is.

      Reality. It's a b!tch.
      GuyAlanDye
      • Force every force there is an equal and opposite force.

        That's really all there is to it.
        fr0thy2
        • umm

          That only applies to forces that can be measured in empirical terms like that used in newtonian physics, it realy does not apply in this case.

          You would have to be stupid to think otherwise.
          jdbukis@...
          • You clearly don't know much Physics!

            Do you by any chance know what an inertial force is? I'm sure you don't.
            InAction Man
          • That's right, Physics!

            And just where do any of the physical laws necessarily apply to this particular subject?
            mckenzl
          • ask jdbukis@, he brought the subject

            apparently only to let everyone know how much of an ignorant he is.
            InAction Man
          • they dont

            Just idiots that dont have anything interesting to say so they have to 'try' to downplay the intelligence of others...it makes them feel superior ya know. While there mommies are out getting them more junk food to eat as they play on the computer and watch tv. Hey at least they're multitasking!
            webstalkers@...
          • Newtonian Physics

            Not that it matters, but Newton's Third Law states that for every action there is an equal and opposite reaction (not "force"). Further, inertia is not a force either: Newton's First Law (also known as the Law of Inertia) states that an object at rest tends to stay at rest and that an object in uniform motion tends to stay in uniform motion unless acted upon by a net external force.
            RSArdrey
          • Coriolis force, centripetal force... have you heard of those?

            Anyone who went through college must have at least heard of them.

            To bad you couldn't make it!
            InAction Man
          • You just described an inertial force...

            [i]Newton's First Law (also known as the Law of Inertia) states that an object at rest tends to stay at rest and that an object in uniform motion tends to stay in uniform motion unless acted upon by a net external force.[/i]

            That statement describes how a body reacts to a force that wants to change its current state. The body's inertia creates an opposing force. So even though "inertia" is not a force, there is such a thing as "inertial force."
            tikigawd
          • Fictitious force From Wikipedia

            Fictitious force
            From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
            (Redirected from Inertial force)
            See also: Mechanics of planar particle motion
            A fictitious force, also called a pseudo
            force,[1] d'Alembert force[2][3] or inertial
            force,[4][5] is an apparent force that acts on
            all masses in a non-inertial frame of
            reference, such as a rotating reference frame.
            The forces may be treated algebraically like a
            real force, but the fictitious forces do not
            necessarily obey Newton's third law.
            The force F does not arise from any physical
            interaction but rather from the acceleration a
            of the non-inertial reference frame itself. As
            stated by Iro:[6][7]
            An additional force due to nonuniform relative
            motion of two reference frames is called a
            pseudo-force.
            ? H Iro in A Modern Approach to Classical
            Mechanics p. 180
            Due to Newton's second law in the form F = m a,
            fictitious forces always are proportional to
            the mass m acted upon.
            Non-inertial reference frames may be a
            convenience in calculation, or an intuitively
            appealing explanation of everyday life, but
            whenever using a non-inertial reference frame,
            its acceleration results in fictitious forces.
            Four fictitious forces are defined in
            accelerated frames: one caused by any relative
            acceleration of the origin in a straight line
            (rectilinear acceleration),[8] two caused by
            any rotation (centrifugal force and Coriolis
            force) and a fourth, called the Euler force,
            caused by a variable rate of rotation, should
            that occur.
            Lynn110
      • And a stone cold one, at that.

        [i]Reality. It's a b!tch. [/i]
        Hallowed are the Ori
    • Which is why we

      and many others do not use Linux

      Fool me once .....
      Fool me twice.
      Fool me three times.
      Fool me four times.
      But fool me five times and I must be a yet [b]another[/b] Linux sucker.
      GuidingLight
      • No it's because you're a brand name addict.

        Why else would you keep paying money to a convicted monopoly when it's completely unnecessary? Only because you don't know any better.
        fr0thy2
        • RE:

          1) In civil law, you aren't convicted; instead there is a finding of fact. Therefore, Microsoft cannot be a 'convicted' monopolist.

          2) Microsoft now isn't Microsoft of 1998. Why would I avoid them if I like their product, because of a *civil* matter that doesn't affect me?

          3) Whatever happened to liking something apart from the actions of the company?
          MarkKB
          • Don't you get it?

            You have to hate Microsoft!! You just HAVE to!!!

            fr0thy2 says you have to!!! Don't you want to be cool and hip like him???

            No? Neither do I.
            Hallowed are the Ori
          • I beg to differ...

            Read this and get back to us: http://www.ecis.eu/documents/Finalversion_Consumerchoicepaper.pdf
            914four
          • Thank You...

            for posting that. Maybe someday people will see MS for what they truly are, however I find a lot of people tend to be single and closed minded so I rather doubt it.
            Dave32265
          • --> see MS for what they truly are...

            A company that practiced hard-ball business which served three purposes:

            1) Put Microsoft's OS on nearly every desktop (in itself not a bad thing)
            2) Made computers more available to consumers and businesses and finally,
            3) Created a computer standards of sorts for third party developers to be able to create useful software and make more money, thereby stimulating the economy.

            Also creating "exclusive contracts" is not, in itself, illegal. It only "becomes" illegal when some whiner company who's product isn't all that special and due to their own failings becomes quite inferior. (Example: Real Player. It became the AOL of media players...)

            Then last but not least, there's the socialists of the world who feel that hard work by others should still be given away free.
            PollyProteus