How fast are enterprises going Windows 7? Not fast enough for Unisys

How fast are enterprises going Windows 7? Not fast enough for Unisys

Summary: Unisys, one of Microsoft's key integration partners, seemingly isn't happy about Windows 7's adoption rate in the enterprise.

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Unisys, one of Microsoft's key integration partners, seemingly isn't happy about Windows 7's adoption rate in the enterprise.

Unisys conducted an online poll in March to gauge business adoption of Windows 7. The number of respondents was small: 133. But that didn't stop Unisys from issuing a press release on April 27 with the headline "Enterprises Should Take Quicker Action on Windows 7 Migrations, Unisys Poll Suggests."

"(O)nly 21 percent of respondents answered 'Migration underway,'" the release noted, "while a combined 53 percent answered 'Haven’t started,' or 'Not migrating.' Twenty-five percent said that, at the time, they were 'Piloting Windows 7.'"

So why did a Microsoft partner -- one that has been a big Windows 7 backer -- issue a release like this? At face value, Unisys’ goal with the release and post was to highlight the consequences of not migrating and to push businesses to transition, given that support for Windows XP is slated to end in 2014.

But was there more? Unhappiness with their Windows 7 consulting take-home percentage? A way to try to drum up more business? Based on the accompanying blog post about the need to bust Windows 7 adoption myths, I think it's more of an attempted sales technique (possibly gone wrong).

I asked Microsoft for comment on Unisys' findings and was told the company wouldn't comment on the results.

A spokesperson did point me to other data from various market researchers that showed Windows 7 enterprise adoption wasn't lagging, including a Gartner press release from April 27, which pegged Microsoft's total operating system market share (for client and server) at 78.6 percent in 2010, up from 77.9 percent in 2009. The Gartner release didn't mention Windows 7 business adoption specifically, but did say that Windows 7 is gaining market acceptance.

From the Gartner report:

"A new wave of PC refreshment after the economic recession was the major reason for the better-performing Windows (client) business. Windows 7 also gained market acceptance as the successor to Windows Vista and XP. The projected EOL (end of life, meaning of support) of XP in early 2014 drove enterprises to accelerate migration to Windows 7 in the second half of 2010."

In October 2010, Forrester released its own survey of business users' plans to migrate to Windows 7. Forrester found that 90 percent of business contacted expect to migrate to Windows 7 eventually. Forrester researchers said at that time that 46% of 2,300 firms surveyed were reporting that "they have already begun or will begin deploying Windows 7 within the next 12 months.”

Microsoft officials said recently that the company has sold 350 million Windows 7 licenses in the 18 months it has been available, but did not break out the consumer vs. enterprise sales for the product.

Topics: Software, Microsoft, Operating Systems, Windows

About

Mary Jo has covered the tech industry for 30 years for a variety of publications and Web sites, and is a frequent guest on radio, TV and podcasts, speaking about all things Microsoft-related. She is the author of Microsoft 2.0: How Microsoft plans to stay relevant in the post-Gates era (John Wiley & Sons, 2008).

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186 comments
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  • RE: How fast are enterprises going Windows 7? Not fast enough for Unisys

    Agreed - this is a marketing plot.
    mlxho
    • 133 is a small sample

      Hi :)
      As Mary Jo pointed out it is a very small sample size and could easily be a non-representative group, perhaps even a small group of people that know each other! Even the 2,300 sample is quite small and difficult to extrapolate from in any meaningful way.
      Regards from Tom :)
      Tom6
      • RE: How fast are enterprises going Windows 7? Not fast enough for Unisys

        @Tom6 yeah but why would unisys be pushing it at all, and not M$? and if the adoption is moving fast enough for M$ why isnt it fast enough for unisys, I have to agree something doesnt smell right there...
        nickdangerthirdi@...
    • RE: How fast are enterprises going Windows 7? Not fast enough for Unisys

      @mlxho
      Far too fast for me. I am forced to use Win7 at work and it drives me mad. Everyday I have to try to do something and end up searching Google or asking others in the office how to do it, or where has the menu gone - all things I could have simply done myself quickly and easily in WinXP. Don't even get me started on Office 2007. AARRGGHH!!! Why does MS think that moving stuff around and making it hard to find justifies a new release and suckering people into forking over yet more money?
      rahbm
      • Don't upgrade to IE 9...

        @rahbm <br><br>Don't upgrade to IE 9 rahbm ... No more search bar... MS lost it big time on that one... And then there is the fact that MS forces Windows 7 enterprise users to be admins... No more power users group... Making them standard users is a nightmare... <br><br>Common sense states you don't run users as admin... but then again, common sense states you don't take away the search bar in a friggin web browser... So MS just keeps poppin bullets in their feet while the rest of the industry wizzes on by... Not a good time to be a MS share holder... <br><br>It's bad enough that windows still hasn't boken free from a stand alone archetecture with networking being an afterthought... But they are doing some incredibly stupid things... And End of support for Vista is right around the corner and they are sloppy on Vista security as well... That's how MS thanks the morons who supported them in their time of need (the Vista fiasco). It's almost like Ballmer is actually working for the competition... Friggin crazy...
        i8thecat
  • It could just be...

    ...that businesses with tighter budgets aren't using consulting firms to do their migrations. I've been heavily rolling out Windows 7 to my enterprise businesses as quickly as I can keep up! So far I have two of my 4 businesses upgraded, 1/2 of the third, and 1/3 of the fourth business.

    I'm still seeing reduced support calls for the upgraded systems, and my users when asked about it are happier due to simple things like pinned shortcuts and files on the taskbar.

    Now that I'm using newer Group Policy methods of folder redirection instead of classic roaming profiles, files and settings are following them without all the added network traffic as well, and that certainly makes my migrations easier when I can re-image and go.
    GoodThings2Life
    • Message has been deleted.

      itguy08
      • RE: How fast are enterprises going Windows 7? Not fast enough for Unisys

        @itguy08 ... I don't know why I'm taking the time responding to you, because frankly you tick me off with every stupid post you make, but what the heck... I feel like setting the record straight for readers, and I'm bored while I wait for dinner to cook...

        It would suck leaving Windows. Why?

        First, because contrary to your statement, I'd have to take a very significant amount of time and resources to retrain my entire user base on how to actually use another OS platform.

        Also, none of my business applications would work and I'd spend a fortune finding solutions to replace them. Contrary to your make-believe fantasies, most businesses are trying to get work done not just surf the web responding to blog posts.

        As for your re-imaging BS comment, I image a system once... when I deploy it. At most, I'll do it a second time, because I want to replace XP with W7. But I don't re-image because of user-caused problems, because my systems are tightly controlled through useful things like Group Policy and appropriate maintenance. Not to mention, between myself and our desktop support specialist, we can fix any other issue we come up against.

        You call yourself an IT Guy, and I am thankful you don't work for me.
        GoodThings2Life
        • RE: How fast are enterprises going Windows 7? Not fast enough for Unisys

          @itguy08 ... Incidentally, the support calls we take are more productive "how can I accomplish this" or application-specific questions and very rarely "this doesn't work" type calls.
          GoodThings2Life
      • RE: How fast are enterprises going Windows 7? Not fast enough for Unisys

        @itguy08 I don't know if everyone will feel that way, but I do think that the learning curve going from XP to say UBUNTU is less than going to Windows 7 or Vista as the GUI is closer. Same goes for Open Office's Word and mail solutions from Office 2003 vs. learning Office 2007/2010. The REAL limitation is that Open Office/Libre Office doesn't have a comparable spreadsheet or database solution yet.
        Socratesfoot
      • LIES LIES LIES

        @itguy08

        You have no business to be doing anything IT.
        bobiroc
      • RE: How fast are enterprises going Windows 7? Not fast enough for Unisys

        This site is a joke.

        I'll just flag myself and save the shills a click.
        Return_of_the_jedi
      • Unisys would LOVE to have people use Linux

        @itguy08
        tons more support call, yearly upgrades, non working software; I'm sure Unisys would love that.

        As it is now, Windows 7 is so good that i think they're getting less supportcalls, and are hoping that upgrades will keep them working for the future!
        Bill Pharaoh
      • RE: How fast are enterprises going Windows 7? Not fast enough for Unisys

        @GoodThings2Life
        I have been consulting at major banks for the past 5 years. So far, not a single one of my clients switched to Windows 7. When I ask why, the answer is that it is hard to make a business case, XP works just fine.

        As for applications, web based apps are much more popular. in fact, over the last 5 years I only worked on one client app, all the rest are web based... either ASP.Net or Java. The reason is obvious. Deployment and simplicity of web based apps... It just costs so much less to deploy and maintain.

        I can see some companies using other client OS than Windows and it would not be the end of the world. The major Windows app is MS Office but there are alternatives...
        prof123
      • RE: How fast are enterprises going Windows 7? Not fast enough for Unisys

        " but I do think that the learning curve going from XP to say UBUNTU is less than going to Windows 7 or Vista as the GUI is closer."

        I disagree. The UI in Vista and Windows 7 has the same basic menu structure as XP and the the same basic layout with a single bar at the bottom and the Start menu opening with the Windows key. Ubuntu isn't anywhere near that by default. It defaults to two bars, finer grained categorization of software, and the Windows key being totally useless. I fail to see how that's closer to XP than what Windows 7 has.
        CobraA1
      • RE: Windows GUI

        @CobraA1

        I argue that one all the time. It is still Windows. Start button in lower left where you find your programs and options, taskbar on the bottom (Unless you move it of course), Control Panel is still control Panel, and all the main functionality is the same. Some of the management things are a bit different but nothing drastic.

        Some make it out like going from XP to Vista or 7 is like going from driving a regular automatic car to a commercial air liner.
        bobiroc
      • RE: How fast are enterprises going Windows 7? Not fast enough for Unisys

        @GoodThings2Life
        He's a disgruntled McDonalds Fry Cook, - IT doesn't stand for Info Tech - it's the 1st and last letters in IdioT....
        ItsTheBottomLine
      • RE: How fast are enterprises going Windows 7? Not fast enough for Unisys

        "Some make it out like going from XP to Vista or 7 is like going from driving a regular automatic car to a commercial air liner. "<br><br>Indeed. I'd say a the UI arrangement in Windows 7 is very familiar. After all, Microsoft wants an easy transition, not a difficult one. The cool Aero effects make Windows look nicer, but don't affect the functionality so much as to make it alien or foreign.<br><br>The changes to the UI in Windows 7 I'd argue are evolutionary rather than revolutionary. There are changes, but not so much as to make it an entirely new OS or anything like that.<br><br>Ubuntu, on the other hand, is very much different. Especially with the default Gnome (or Unity) desktop. A Mac user would likely recognize the two bar arrangement, but not a Windows user. A Windows user would IMO be a bit confused at first with the two bar arrangement and the various items moved around. It's very different from XP, and yes I believe far more different than Windows 7 is. IMO it would feel very alien to a first time user.<br><br>Granted, you'll get used to any UI after a bit of practice, but as long as we're talking first time users - yes, moving to Ubuntu would take a lot more effort than moving to Windows 7 from XP. I don't see any reason to believe otherwise.
        CobraA1
      • RE: How fast are enterprises going Windows 7? Not fast enough for Unisys

        @Socratesfoot I'd say the learning curve going to openSUSE or SLED from XP (my own experience) is even smaller still. SUSE doesn't imitate the Mac by putting the task bar on top or the close/minimize buttons on the left, etc. I took to SUSE like a fish to water but despite being the go-to guy among family and friends for their computer needs I've recently found Windows 7, which I've never personally used, to be a bit flustering at times.
        jgm@...
    • Message has been deleted.

      DannyO_0x98