Microsoft makes IE with component activation change available to testers

Microsoft makes IE with component activation change available to testers

Summary: The so-called Internet Explorer Automatic Component Activation (IE ACA) update for Internet Explorer 6 and 7 is now available to testers who want to check out Microsoft's IE refresh that will disable the "Click to Activate" control.

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TOPICS: Browser, Microsoft
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Microsoft is on a test-build roll this week. The latest team to offer a test build of a new release is the Internet Explorer (IE) one.

On the IE Team blog, Microsoft officials posted on December 11 about the availability of the so-called Internet Explorer Automatic Component Activation (IE ACA) update.

The IE team has posted for download public test builds of IE 6 and IE 7 that disable the "click to activate" feature that Microsoft added to IE in April 2006 in order to comply with a patent-infringement ruling against Microsoft. In August, Microsoft settled with the plaintiff, Eolas, for an undisclosed amount. Consequently, Microsoft no longer needs to provide a separate "click to activate" control to supplement IE.

Microsoft has made available a number of IE builds that disable the control: IE 6 for XP, IE 6 for Windows Server 2003, IE 7 for XP, IE 7 for Windows Server 2003 and IE 7 for Windows Vista. All of those builds can be accessed via a Microsoft Knowledge Base article page on the browser refresh.

Microsoft officials said in November that the company planned to release a test version of the IE refresh in December 2007. The final release of the IE refresh is set for April 2008, and will be released as part of an IE Cumulative Update, according to Microsoft.

Topics: Browser, Microsoft

About

Mary Jo has covered the tech industry for 30 years for a variety of publications and Web sites, and is a frequent guest on radio, TV and podcasts, speaking about all things Microsoft-related. She is the author of Microsoft 2.0: How Microsoft plans to stay relevant in the post-Gates era (John Wiley & Sons, 2008).

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11 comments
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  • Excellent news for end users and web designers.

    Guess no one realy needed EOLAS after all...
    No_Ax_to_Grind
    • This coming from Mr. I love patents? (nt)

      nt = no text
      CobraA1
      • Gee, you seem to be completely confused

        becuase unlike yourself, I am actively working to have the laws changed. Perhaps if you did more than whine about people you are clueless about and actually did something you would get further. (I know, a strange concept for you isn't it...)
        No_Ax_to_Grind
        • How do you know?

          Ho do you know I'm not doing anything?

          And what are you doing about it anyways?
          CobraA1
    • "Guess no one realy needed EOLAS after all..."

      "Guess no one realy needed EOLAS after all..."

      Except for Microsoft , who paid EOLAS an undisclosed amount of money . Wow ,
      Microsoft is still innovating . NOT!!!
      Intellihence
      • in all fairness

        Apple, Firefox, and every other web browser maker stole the same thing. Eolas just went after the deepest pockets.

        Or do you mean Apple innovations, like CoverFlow or the iPod scrollwheel or an entire OS they had to cut and paste from FreeBSD?
        mdemuth
        • "stole"?

          Amazing how managing to create something without looking at somebody else's work is considered "stealing."
          CobraA1
      • Huh. paid? Naw, appealed.

        Sorry, your off base again...
        No_Ax_to_Grind
  • On a bug fix roll ...

    ... presuambly because of a downward turn in software quality. I'm tending to agree with AKH - consumers are in a perpetual state of beta.
    jacksonjohn
  • *Thumbs Up*

    This is great, I have found this activation "feature" to be incredibly annoying to no end. I will be more then happy to promptly install this update right when it is released. I am very thankful that Microsoft has been able to work out a deal to get rid of this god awful feature...

    - John Musbach
    John Musbach
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