Microsoft WGA servers are fixed, but no word on what went wrong

Microsoft WGA servers are fixed, but no word on what went wrong

Summary: Microsoft has fixed whatever caused a massive worldwide outage of its Windows Genuine Advantage (WGA) system that seemed to last just under 24 hours. So far, however, company officials aren't commenting publicly on what happened.

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TOPICS: Servers, Microsoft
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Microsoft has fixed whatever caused a massive worldwide outage of its Windows Genuine Advantage (WGA) system that seemed to last just under 24 hours. So far, however, company officials aren't commenting publicly on what happened.

At 6 p.m. EST on August 25, I received the following statement from a Microsoft spokeswoman:

"All (WGA) servers are working properly now. Only those who experienced a validation issue between yesterday afternoon and about 11 a.m. Pacific today need to go back to the validation page."

Starting Friday evening, a number of XP and Windows Vista users reported problems when attempting to download fixes, updates and other software when they were required to validate using WGA. Lack of official information from Microsoft regarding when a fix would be coming frustrated a number of users, who complained publicly via the Microsoft Genuine Forum.

If and when Microsoft shares more on what happened, I'll update this post.

 

Topics: Servers, Microsoft

About

Mary Jo has covered the tech industry for 30 years for a variety of publications and Web sites, and is a frequent guest on radio, TV and podcasts, speaking about all things Microsoft-related. She is the author of Microsoft 2.0: How Microsoft plans to stay relevant in the post-Gates era (John Wiley & Sons, 2008).

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137 comments
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  • Perhaps the servers failed their own WGA tests and ran...

    ... with reduced functionality. A chicken and egg thing. That would be funny.
    BanjoPaterson
    • ROTFL

      That was priceless!
      devlin_X
      • Very adolescent post

        Yes, it was a very adolescent post that reflects poorly on the intelligence of the OP.
        cnfrisch
        • A typical Microsoft response

          Lash out at their customers for their poorly
          designed obtuse defective over-rated
          products failures.
          Ole Man
          • Shut up, OleFool.

            nt
            M.R. Kennedy
          • Always the same!

            doltish, dull, dumb, fatheaded, half-witted,
            ignorant, imbecilic, impassive, lethargic,
            numskulled, obtuse, phlegmatic, simple,
            slow-witted, sluggish, stolid, torpid
            remarks from the Troll.

            Keep up the good work!

            Hasta_La_Vistaaaaaa.... enjoy your WGA and
            EULA
            Ole Man
        • Actually, thought it was hilarious . . .

          ... and knowing Microsoft's track record, could entirely be true...
          Basic Logic
        • Here's what you do...

          You dig up a dictionary, look up the word "irony", or the phrase "poetic justice", then see if you can find someone to loan or rent you a sense of humor. You'll only need it for a few minutes, then you can go back to being your doddering ol' self.
          Dr. John
    • ROTFLMAO!!! :^0

      .
      That was hilariously funny! :^0

      ...the WGA servers were unavailable because they were de-activated by WGA and running in "reduced functionality mode"...

      :^0 :^0 :^0



      P.S. Funny as it is, this shows quite clearly that WGA capricious de-activation is unacceptable. I'm only laughing because I have chosen to not be affected by Microsoft's insanity anymore. I will [u]never[/u] run Vista or Longhorn servers.
      TechExec2
  • MSFT WGA Servers are fixed

    I would think that like a lot of other technology, a "reset" of the servers fixed the problem. Perhaps the issue was hardware related. Is there any technolgy available today that is 100% stone-cold reliable?
    cnfrisch
    • "a "reset"

      Um... you mean <i><b>re-boot</i></b> yep thats standard regular practice for a Windows based machine...... Not because the user wants to but because Windows forces it.
      devlin_X
      • Or third party applications

        lock up the system.
        John Zern
        • Hey, that's a good excuse!

          You oughta submitt that one to Microsoft!

          They might give you a pat on the back and an
          attaboy.
          Ole Man
          • At the very least

            he offered a possibility. As if 3rd party apps have never been a problem on windows. <br>
            What's your hypothesis? Let's hear it from the man who seems to know everything about how wrong and bad microsoft and it's software is...i'm eager to hear a "non biased" explanation from the voice of "reason".
            xuniL_z
          • Well, the correct answer would be.....

            If it hadn't been there to begin with, a
            third party app could hardly have affected
            it, Could it? It's not as if a computer
            really NEEDS WGA to function correctly, is
            it? And if it has already been activated
            (possibly several times) by Microsoft
            themselves, no less, what possible reason
            could necessitate activation again? Now go
            ahead and give us your lame excuses for WGA.

            You're thinking backward, as usual. Look in
            the mirror and you will be face to face with
            your problems.
            Ole Man
          • Non biased question Xunil .

            Since when does Microsoft use third party applications on there servers ?
            Intellihence
          • universal repair procedure for windows

            reboot windows, the universal cure for anything microsuck can't fix properly, no matter how many patches and so-called fixes they come out with...
            jaybyrd
    • No tech is 100% reliable, but have you heard of fault tolerance?

      The problem with MS technology is that the components are so tightly coupled together that a failure in one component brings down (or hangs) many other components.

      .
      Basic Logic
    • How about.........

      pry bars?

      Never had one let me down yet.

      Old tech, but reliable.
      middle of nowhere
  • Meanwhile, George Ou and Ed Bott

    say "Move along, nothing to see here...there is never an issue with Microsoft, only third part apps, hardware, and users!"
    johnf76@...