Near-feature-complete Visual Studio 2008 Beta 2 due later this week

Near-feature-complete Visual Studio 2008 Beta 2 due later this week

Summary: Microsoft plans to deliver the Beta 2 bits of Visual Studio 2008 ("Orcas") later this week, according to Scott Guthrie, General Manager of Microsoft's Developer Division. Meanwhile, the Redmondians have delivered a first pre-alpha of IronRuby, Microsoft's implementation of the Ruby dynamic language.

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Microsoft plans to deliver the Beta 2 bits of Visual Studio 2008 ("Orcas") later this week, according to Scott Guthrie, General Manager of Microsoft's Developer Division.

"You'll see Beta2 ship later this week - so only a few more days now," Guthrie posted, in response to a reader comment, on July 23. "VS 2008 and .NET 3.5 Beta2 (which will be out later this week) are pretty much feature complete. We'll do some small features additions/chanegs based on new feedback on Beta2, but 99% of the features are all there."

Visual Studio 2008 is Microsoft's latest family of development tools aimed at Windows Vista, Office 2007 and Windows Server 2008 developers. New features include the LINQ (Language Integrated Query) functionality; a Windows Presentation Foundation visual designer; and an updated version (3.5) of the .Net Framework.

Microsoft delivered Beta 1 of Visual Studio 2008 in April and has dropped a few Community Technology Preview (CTP) interim builds since then. Company officials have said they planned to launch Beta 2 sometime this summer and to release the tool suite to manufacturing in either very late 2007 or early 2008.

Microsoft plans a launch party for Visual Studio 2008, SQL Server 2008 and Windows Server 2008 on February 27, 2008, in Los Angeles.

Meanwhile, on July 23, Microsoft rolled out a first "pre-alpha" build of its IronRuby dynamic language. Microsoft licensed some of the Ruby.Net source code, but makes use of Microsoft's Dynamic Language Runtime (DLR) library, which the company announced at the Mix '07 conference in late April.

Jon Lam -- "the RubyCLR guy" -- joined Microsoft in January 2007. He has been working on the IronRuby project since that time.

Starting next month, IronRuby will be hosted on the RubyForge code-repository site and will have both Microsoft and non-Microsoft developers working on it. Guthrie noted in his blog post that "the (IronRuby) license also fully allows another group of developers to fork the code and maintain it themselves if they don't think they are doing a good job of it."

But "(w)e are definitely committed to making sure IronRuby is a first class Ruby implementation," Guthrie said.

Topics: Windows, Microsoft, Software Development

About

Mary Jo has covered the tech industry for 30 years for a variety of publications and Web sites, and is a frequent guest on radio, TV and podcasts, speaking about all things Microsoft-related. She is the author of Microsoft 2.0: How Microsoft plans to stay relevant in the post-Gates era (John Wiley & Sons, 2008).

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13 comments
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  • Definitions

    OK, I guess I just didn't get the memo. The development flow I learned ([b]loooong[/b] years ago) [1] went like this:

    [u]* ...
    * feature complete[/u]
    * integration
    * alpha testing
    * lots of bug fixes
    [u]* beta release
    * lots of bug fixes[/u]
    * Repeat previous two steps as needed until
    * Acceptable quality achieved
    [u]* RTP[/u]

    If I read correctly, MS only uses the underlined steps.
    Is MS the anomaly here or has the language changed?

    [1] And still use today for major chip-design projects. We have a pretty good record of first-time success, too.
    Yagotta B. Kidding
    • Must be different for chip projects.

      The way I've always known it is:

      Alpha = basic working prototype, some or many major features not
      implemented

      Beta = largely feature complete, still has serious bugs, artwork
      and documentation not necessarily completed

      Release Candidate = feature fixed, few to no bugs

      Final Release = feature complete, no known bugs.
      odubtaig
  • Awesome!

    This is a very exciting beta release for those of us developing applications on the .NET platform. Beta 1 was a little lacking in features, especially the WPF visual designer. Since this beta is being advertised as being virtually feature complete, I'm sincerely hoping that we'll see a fully functional and polished WPF designer.
    Tiggster
  • another 'near'/'pretty much' product aka 'hot air'

    [VS 2008 and .NET 3.5 Beta2 (which will be out later this week) are pretty much feature complete.]
    Just throw in some buzz words and numbers and you have a new 'product'. That is so micro$oftic!
    Linux Geek
    • Go Away Troll

      You don't know anything about Microsoft development products and have nothing worthwhile to add. Go away!
      bmonster
    • Huh?

      I'm assuming from your handle that you're a Linux user. FYI: Visual Studio far surpasses any development tools available on Linux or the UNIX platform. The simply is no comparison and probably never will be.
      Tiggster
      • yeah...right!

        you better check some objective reviews before you talked:
        http://msmvps.com/blogs/jon.skeet/archive/2005/12/22/79631.aspx
        http://www.javaworld.com/javaforums/showflat.php?Cat=0&Number=5299&an=0&page=0
        http://djaquay.blogspot.com/2004/10/leaving-net-world.html
        or http://www.manageability.org/blog/archive/20030108%23101_reasons_why_java_is
        and the list could go on and on...
        Linux Geek
        • Objective reviews?

          Oh, excuse me. I just threw up in my mouth a little.

          Ah-hem, ok, that's better.

          Um, yeah so if you're going to point to some links you better make sure they were written within like oh, say, the last 50 YEARS or are not somebody's personal "101 reasons why I LOVE JAVA" blog posting or other crap from the Linux/Java Echo Chamber. Pathetic to call those objective reviews.

          Bottom line is that you are not going to find many if any that think that Eclipse is so vastly superior to VS. It simply isn't. The only thing Eclipse has going for it is its community. If it didn't have that, it would be dead.

          So glad you love your tool, but please stop being a dork in trying to compare it to VS. Just move along Linux Geek, move along.
          BFD
        • What about you?

          Ok...so you can google. Impressive. Have you ever used Visual Studio.NET? VS.NET 2003? VS.NET 2005? For that matter, have you used eclipse? Do you have any personal experience you can bring to the discussion? No? Go away.
          bmonster
          • Of course he hasn't.

            Of course he hasn't used them.

            Me, I'm going to buy VS2008 when it comes out. It will be extra nice just knowing how much it will bug him that yet another person's "giving" Microsoft their money.
            lutherlarry
    • Go Away

      You have no idea what your are talking about Linux Geek.
      ea01bg
    • You have no idea what you're talking about.

      Sorry. Go back to your late 20th century.
      Grayson Peddie
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