New Microsoft Office 2010 test build leaks

New Microsoft Office 2010 test build leaks

Summary: Microsoft officials said last week that the company would release a new test build of its Office 2010 suite in July. But it looks like some testers got it at the end of this week and subsequently leaked it to the Web.

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Microsoft officials said last week that the company would release a new test build of its Office 2010 suite in July. But it looks like some testers got it at the end of this week and subsequently leaked it to the Web.

The build that leaked is not the January alpha. It likely is the invitation-only test build due to g o out officially to thousands of invited testers this summer. Ars Technica has screen shots up, showing the Ribbonization of the entire Office 2010 ("Office 14") family.  The new "SharePoint Workspace Manager" product (a k a, relabeld Groove synchronization client), which Microsoft acknowledged this past week would be part of the Office 2010 Professional Plus SKU, is part of the leaked bits. Windows-Now blogger Robert McLaws has screen shots up showing one way Microsoft is planning to "light up" Office 2010 when it is used with Windows 7 (via an Office jump list).

SharePoint 2010 is slated to go to a group of testers in July, as well. But it sounds like that SharePoint's planned Community Tchnology Preview (CTP) will be conducted separately from the Office 2010 client one.

Anyone seen a leaked copy of the Office Web Apps -- the Web versions of the 2010 client apps that also are supposed to go to testers in July?

Topics: Microsoft, Collaboration, Software

About

Mary Jo has covered the tech industry for 30 years for a variety of publications and Web sites, and is a frequent guest on radio, TV and podcasts, speaking about all things Microsoft-related. She is the author of Microsoft 2.0: How Microsoft plans to stay relevant in the post-Gates era (John Wiley & Sons, 2008).

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56 comments
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  • My mini-review

    I'm pretty much impressed with the new Office suite! It loads somewhat faster even on my netbook and now I can clearly increase my workspace with the auto-hide ribbon function.

    Check out my mini-review over at my blog. I posted some thoughts on Office 2010 there:

    http://www.mangochico.com/office-2010-preview/
    josefarrugia
    • A bit amiss.....

      I see no need in being locked in to MS Office, can someone please explain to me why they need to spend $500-700+ for a program to do .doc...
      Christian_<><
      • What is it with you?

        Nobody but nobody said YOU had to purchase anything. Use OpenOffice to your heart's content. Why is that you can't go sing the praises of your desired products in blogs of your peers? Instead, you spend more time trashing products you don't believe in. Although, I'll give you SOME credit here...at least you didn't bring up Obama in THIS post like you usually do.
        MGP2
        • Leaking is the closest MS will ever come to FOSS.

          I've got nothing against driving an economy, but driving it with nonsense software, lies and lock-ins is a ridiculous way to go.

          Still, that's MS for you.
          fr0thy2
          • re:MGP2 - See above I rest my case...nt

            nt
            US Is ! Europe-ThankGod!
        • LOL - that's funny - wait Frothy will not be far behind

          with some lame non-relevant comment.
          US Is ! Europe-ThankGod!
      • it's about value ..

        well, for one .. i would suggest it's relative to the value of the communications you're producing. based on your usual comments I'd suggest a text editor of some sort .. notepad etc, is probably sufficient in your case.
        kRanki1
        • Will ?20,000 will make you believe it's even more valuable?

          That's the human psychology side of the equation.

          Thanks for playing.

          MS 1
          You 0
          fr0thy2
        • Good Point - nt

          nt
          US Is ! Europe-ThankGod!
      • Where have you seen Word being sold at $500 - $700?

        You need to find a different supplier man, you are getting ripped off. <br>
        Professionals that go beyong the 70.00 to 130.00 suites of Word, Excel, Powerpoint are doing so purposely to have the best office tools on earth. <br>
        MS Office totally dwarfs oo.org or Google apps et al with it's productivity enhancing integration throughout the MS software stack and powerful solutions the others can't touch or would require much custom programming at very high cost to only emulate a fraction of what Office can do out of the box by the end users. <br>
        The ribbon - it can take up to a few weeks for an office user to get familiar with the ribbon, even though it can be hidden, but users love it and do not want to ever go back once they realize how easy it actually is to use and he ease with which they can now do complex tasks. Studies have shown the ribbon cuts keystrokes and/or mouse clicks in half, or better.
        oo.org matches up against the free MS Works that comes with all Windows machines. Or at best Office '97 with only a portion of the functionality. <br>
        Apple, forget it, have nothing in this class, except of course the MS Office for Mac that has sold like hotcakes.
        xuniL_z
        • Ahem....

          Now, xunil_z, you know you and I are USUALLY on the same side....but not on this one.

          [i]but users love it and do not want to ever go back once they realize how easy it actually is to use and he ease with which they can now do complex tasks[/i]

          As someone who has used Office since 1993/94, I really don't like being told to break out of a habit I've had for nearly 15 years. I really think the best approach would have been to include an option for users to keep their menus and let them ease into the ribbon at their own pace.
          MGP2
          • I, erm, agree...

            I feel dirty, now! You are absolutely right, see Autocad 2009/2010 with
            it's classic mode. Although I would urge you to stick with the ribbon
            interface, it's one of the few things Microsoft have got right recently.
            Once you've got beyond the initial learning curve, it [i]is[/i] easier to use.
            SimonUK2
          • ahem, the old menus are still there. They are accessed at the bottom right.

            corner of each ribbon section. <br>
            I know we agree on much, but I also part ways with you here. <br>
            The first and foremost ability an IT professional must possess IMHO, is the ability to adapt to change as needed. Technology is a moving target. <br>
            I'm surprised you haven't dived deep into the ribbon to find what you really have there. And there is a ton of customization w/o even touching Visual studio and VSTO. <br>
            I've compared keystrokes on some of the more common tasks performed at main site by patient accounting and fiscal. I am not exaggerating at all when I tell you the ribbon UI can cut the user's time in half. <br>
            A simple example...maybe too simple...is building a form, which the form's committee does regularly and in Word. The ability to have context sensitive ribbon display as they work is awesome. graphics are so easily placed and text wrapped, orientation, 3D effects whatever you like are presented in your document as you mouse over the galleries of postions, shapes, text wrapping options....it's too easy. A very complex document such as the weekly hospital employee publication is now completed in less than half the former time. <br>
            Remember, your old menus are all there. Actually they are right there on the ribbon with lots of new features, but if you are uncomforable with it, that's your perogative.
            xuniL_z
          • agree

            I totally agree, went from 2007 back to 2003 because of the damn ribbon...
            corbydude
          • change

            I also fear change...not really, but I am too old to keep learning new standards over and over again. Change for the sake of change irks me.
            mojorison67@...
          • MS doesn't take change lightly. That's why you can still access old dialogs

            MS put a lot of time and effort into studying the least used options because they were buried too deep and how to make those accessible to everyone. And additionally to make common tasks even easier while giving the user a totally context sensitive system that brings up only what the user needs.
            They used study groups of consumers, and community previews for feedback. I hate to say it, but people like yourself who hate change were the minority. Office 2007 has sold quite heavily. Not only does that point to a majority that sees the value of the ribbon, it also told us that Windows users were sticking around, even if they didn't adopt Vista right away. <br>
            If you look at the ribbon, you'll see that along the bottom edge are menu areas from the old versions and to the right of those, in the corner of each ribbon section is a small diagonal arrow.
            Click that arrow and the dialog boxes from the old system come up for those who do not embrace change.
            <br>
            If you take the time to learn the ribbon, you will never want to go back. It's really nothing more than having enhanced toolbars turned on, but more organized and by category.
            If you are working on a Word document and the cursor enters a graphic image, the system will automatically make the menu context image related. As you move across the ribbon's galleries for orientation, the image changes inside your document so you can see what you looks like w/o ever applying any of the many choices. same with text wrap, borders, 3D effects, shadowing and on and on. Dropdown galleries appear and you can build your page in a snap to what you like w/o doing any work but hovering your mouse. In Word 2003 to do the same thing, you'd have to drill down into seperate menu entries, make manual changes to orientation and such, APPLY IT, see if you like that one change, then do it for shape..border, effects...and on and on. And apply each of these attributes for each choice as you go. To replicate it you'd have to apply choices from several different sub menus which would take a half hour just to emulate the context sensitive preview that takes seconds in Office 2007.
            Sorry to go on, but we've found that users literally love the ribbon once they force themselves to use it long enough to learn it. They have their AH-HA moment and move on to be much more productive.
            xuniL_z
          • more change...

            "MS put a lot of time and effort into studying the least used options because they were buried too deep and how to make those accessible to everyone. And additionally to make common tasks even easier while giving the user a totally context sensitive system that brings up only what the user needs."

            So what you are saying is that it does the same thing, just differently, and in a way that MS can justify selling it to the same people that just bought the product a few years ago. That is what I mean by change for the sake of change. I understand your points and you did make some good ones, but I honestly believe that MS keeps selling the same products over and over again with different skins without making the products any easier of more productive. Just about everyone I know except for a few exceptions dislikes the ribbon, I understand the ribbon, I just don't like it.
            mojorison67@...
          • Thats what it all comes down to

            People fear change and it is those people that will fall behind in the progress of life. Since they do not understand it they will attack it. I go through this in my organization every time we do an upgrade. When we went to XP back in late 2002 I literally had teachers file a complaint with the union because they wanted to stay on Windows 98. We upgraded to Office 2007 (from Office 2000) in the fall of 2007 and we got more complaints. Before we upgraded we got complaints because students were bringing in files created in newer versions of Office and they were having difficulty opening them or losing features because Office 2000 did not have those features. So people can come here and bash Office 2010 and 2007 for the use of the ribbon menu and it takes some getting used to but to quickly ridicule it like some are doing without even using it long enough to understand it is just plain childish. Same thing happens when other software is released. If you cannot accept change then you do not understand technology.
            bobiroc
        • WE don't use MS period

          We run all Open Source software, there is no reason to rent software and pay licenses when you should use the money on hardware/storage and disaster recovery hardware.

          It is ironic that people still think they need Word to write a simple (.doc) when Open Office can do all of this.

          Also, Macs are vastly superior to any Windows OS and software.

          When you root out the 'fallacy' of the MS sink hole and develop your skill sets Open Source can do amazing things.

          I see no common-sense in a company spending money on this bloatware when it is NOT needed and it is full of security holes.
          Christian_<><
          • Re: WE don't use MS period

            [pre]It is ironic that people still think they need Word to write a simple (.doc) when Open Office can do all of this.[/pre]

            it's not just about .doc or .docx files. MS Office is also about collaboration, and programmability. If your company ONLY needs saving in .doc files with Bolds, Italics, Underlines, tables and stuff like that, then please, use open office.

            [pre]Also, Macs are vastly superior to any Windows OS and software.[/pre]

            Zealot, this article is about MS Office.
            massivegas