Will Virtual PC 2007 give Microsoft Vista app-compat wiggle room?

Will Virtual PC 2007 give Microsoft Vista app-compat wiggle room?

Summary: Microsoft has made available for download Beta 1 of Virtual PC 2007, the version of its desktop virtualization software that -- at least in theory -- will give Windows Vista users one way to run many of their existing apps without problem on Microsoft's next-gen Windows.

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TOPICS: Windows
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Microsoft has made available for download Beta 1 of Virtual PC 2007, the version of its desktop virtualization software that -- at least in theory -- will give Windows Vista users one way to run many of their existing apps without problem on Microsoft's next-gen Windows.

Microsoft posted the Virtual PC 2007 bits on the Connect Web site for download by technical beta testers on October 11.

The newest version of Virtual PC will support Intel and AMD hardware via virtualization and will support Vista as both a host and guest operating system. It also will include support for 64-bit host operating systems, even though the virtual machines will be 32-bit only. Virtual PC 2007 will not support Vista's souped-up Aero Glass interface, however; it will support the Aero Basic user interface only, according to a post to Microsoft's "Virtual PC Guy's Weblog."

Microsoft officials have touted Virtual PC 2007 as another tool that business and consumer customers will have to help insure their existing applications work on Vista.

"Virtual PC 2007 lets you run additional operating systems on Windows Vista, without using multiple computers," according to a white paper posted to Microsoft's Virtual PC Web site. "This allows you to proceed with your Windows Vista deployment, rather than delay because of application incompatibility. Your organization can take full advantage of the new features and capabilities in Windows Vista and still provide end users access to run their legacy mission-critical applications, allowing you to realize your return on investment faster than other short-term solutions."

Microsoft also is touting the Application Compatibility Toolkit, a final Vista-optimized version of which is due to ship alongside Vista, as another tool of which potential Vista customers can make use in their quest for better app compatibility.

In terms of app compat, Microsoft still has not released a public list of applications that are not working with the latest test builds of Windows Vista, and still has not said when it plans to do so.

Like they did with Vista Release Candidate (RC) 1, the members of the ieXbeta site have begun compiling a list of the apps they've found to work well, work to some degree and not work at all with Vista RC2, the test build that Microsoft released on October 6.

On the new list, which ieXbeta members started from scratch, there are a few applications already listed as encountering "heavy problems" and are "not compatible" with Vista RC2. On this list: Symantec Corp AV For Vista 10.2.0.199 (both 32-bit and 64-bit versions); Spyware Doctor 4.0; and Microsoft's own Microsoft Navision 3.70a client.

Topic: Windows

About

Mary Jo has covered the tech industry for 30 years for a variety of publications and Web sites, and is a frequent guest on radio, TV and podcasts, speaking about all things Microsoft-related. She is the author of Microsoft 2.0: How Microsoft plans to stay relevant in the post-Gates era (John Wiley & Sons, 2008).

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8 comments
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  • Not good

    Any time you need a "kit" to help with compatiblity, you know you are going to have trouble.

    http://one.revver.com/watch/77170/format/flv/affiliate/23672
    nightman45
    • Well you could be like other operating systems

      and just release a new version and leave it up to your customers to figure out all the incompatibilities. Or you can try to help your customers, like MS is trying to do.
      PB_z
  • I take it you never heard the word "SHIM"

    nt
    georgeou
    • A shim is ...

      ... a small sliver of material usually inserted into a gap to correct a mis-measurement or a fault in the design and build.
      bportlock
      • No, we're talking about Windows Vista shimming

        A shim allows Vista to lie to a legacy application that it's running in Windows 98, 2000, XP, with full adminstrative privileges if necessary even though you're running in Windows Vista with locked down standard user permissions. You don't need to run a virtual Windows XP to run Windows XP only applications.
        georgeou
        • I know that George...

          [i]"A shim allows Vista to lie to a legacy application that it's running in Windows 98, 2000, XP,...."[/i]

          I was reflecting on the irony of the choice of name. A "shim" is used to shoe-horn something in to place that was either mis-fitted, mis-designed or shoved in as an afterthought.

          Why choose "shim" as a name? I would have chosen something like "holo-deck" or "mirage" because the idea is that the legacy application sees the O/S as being different from how it really is.

          Maybe "undertakers" would have been better to allow them to bury old, unwanted code out of sight?
          bportlock
  • Only if you have Volume Licensing or Multiple License

    MS license only allows you to run one copy of the application on one machine. Hence, for joe user, we need to buy additional MS licenses to run a MS OS on Virtual PC. The only exception is Volume Licensing, where you are permitted to run four virtual machine per seat.

    This, I believe, will affect the majority of users, including business users. Hence, it is not a bridge for the majority. Extra money + extra work. Unless, of course, you have a good reason to go to Vista. Otherwise, the easiest way is to keep the old XP machine humming.
    sinleeh@...
    • Good luck getting a guest activated

      If you're reusing an old version of XP, you will have to endur a long aggravating phone call to get it activated. In my case even that doesn't work because Microsoft considers my product key to be invalid. My PC vender says the only thing I can do is rebuy Windows. I will miss Office and I will really miss Visual Studio but at least I'm not considered a crook in the Linux world.
      kmatzen@...