So you can bring a Sprint phone to Verizon, what's the big deal?

So you can bring a Sprint phone to Verizon, what's the big deal?

Summary: You may have read the announcement this morning that Verizon Wireless is opening up its network so that customers with qualified handsets and software can plug into their network. While this may initially look like an opening up of the network to embrace customers and give them choices, I don't think it is really anything special after a further look. The handset will have to be a CDMA handset and thus the only other carrier that people may move from is Sprint. And if you look at the handsets offered by Sprint and Verizon Wireless, Verizon already has Sprint beat in the number and quality of offerings.

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You may have read the announcement this morning that Verizon Wireless is opening up its network so that customers with qualified handsets and software can plug into their network. While this may initially look like an opening up of the network to embrace customers and give them choices, I don't think it is really anything special after a further look. The handset will have to be a CDMA handset and thus the only other carrier that people may move from is Sprint. And if you look at the handsets offered by Sprint and Verizon Wireless, Verizon already has Sprint beat in the number and quality of offerings. There may be a few customers who are not happy with their Sprint service that move to Verizon Wireless, but the GSM networks run by AT&T and T-Mobile in the U.S. and just about everyone else in the world are a much broader market to open up to. Verizon may be moving to a GSM network in the future with their LTE (Long Term Evolution) network and then this announcement would mean much more in terms of opening up to everyone. LTE was not discussed by Verizon with this press release.

This announcement seems to be designed to bring a bit of focus back to Verizon after the Open Handset Alliance announcement a couple weeks ago where Sprint is actually one of the members. I understand that Verizon Wireless does have an extensive network that many people are happy with, but I am a fan of the GSM networks due to the ability to use virtually any SIM-unlocked device I buy here in the U.S. or internationally with my local US network. AT&T and T-Mobile should make the same announcement about opening up their networks since you can already use any SIM-unlocked device you want on their networks. They are not officially supported by their customer service, just like devices brought to Verizon won't be either.

Topics: Mobility, Hardware, Networking, Telcos, Verizon

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5 comments
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  • Sprint has a few new phones

    Verizon doesn't have the 6800 yet or the Touch though.
    Bittermormon
  • Alltel and Revol also use CDMA

    Plus you'll be able to buy a phone directly from other suppliers if you want.

    This is a step in the right direction.
    otaddy
    • So does Cellular South

      and I believe there are a few other CDMA providers throughout the country.

      With that said, sprint handsets use Java, while Verizon uses Qualomm's BREW. If you'renot using a smart phone, you'll probably find yourself buying a verizon phone anyway, when moving form sprint. Other providers may or may not use BREW as well.
      notsofast
  • RE: So you can bring a Sprint phone to Verizon, what's the big deal?

    What now? They are moving to LTE within three years and all phones (CDMA & GSM -- locked or unlocked) will work.
    jackhappy
  • Cricket, US Cellular, Qwest, Alltel, and more

    I personally prefer GSM, however, many countries like Russia, India, China, Korea, Brazil, also have many CDMA users. So as long as you can get a SPC unlock code for the handset, it will allow the programming of PRL (Preferred Roaming List).
    idealab