Unlocking your mobile phone is no longer prohibited

Unlocking your mobile phone is no longer prohibited

Summary: Last week the U.S. Copyright Office issued a ruling that states cell phone owners are allowed to break their software locks on their devices. There has been quite bit of talk about this on the internet, but the ruling doesn't state anything about requiring wireless carriers to unlock your phone. It just states that people who do so won't be subject to the prohibition against circumventing access controls during the next three years.

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TOPICS: Mobility
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Last week the U.S. Copyright Office issued a ruling that states cell phone owners are allowed to break their software locks on their devices. There has been quite bit of talk about this on the internet, but the ruling doesn't state anything about requiring wireless carriers to unlock your phone. It just states that people who do so won't be subject to the prohibition against circumventing access controls during the next three years.

Unlock your phoneThe specific mobile phone ruling is exemption number 5 in a group of six exemptions approved by the Librarian of Congress and as you can see in the full rulemaking text the exemptions deal with technological measures that control access to copyrighted works. The specific text of exemption 5 states that people will not be subject to the prohibition against circumventing access controls as it applies to:

Computer programs in the form of firmware that enable wireless telephone handsets to connect to a wireless telephone communication network, when circumvention is accomplished for the sole purpose of lawfully connecting to a wireless telephone communication network.

I usually only purchase SIM unlocked phone from overseas because the latest and greatest mobile tech gear is generally released outside the U.S. first while wireless carriers and the FCC take device manufacturers through the ringer issuing approvals. I don't think wireless carriers are going to start advertising that their phone can be used on competing networks and they most likely will keep on issuing locked phones. You could purchase unlocking services online or if you have been with your carrier and your account is in good standing you should be able to get a free unlock code from them. If you don't intent to travel overseas or switch carriers, then there is no reason to worry about unlocking your mobile phone.

Topic: Mobility

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4 comments
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  • You mean it is actually ours!

    We buy the phone, it belongs to us, we are bethrothed to our carrier. SNAP! I have fallen out of love with my carrier. I want to take my gsm world phone with Windows Mobile 5 to purchase another sim card and start anew of course after porting my number to a new carrier signing no agreement BYOP.

    Then I can fall out of love again in 6-24 months with a different service provider.

    So are the days of your life.
    jm4az
  • So...

    [b]I usually only purchase SIM unlocked phone from overseas because the latest and greatest mobile tech gear is generally released outside the U.S. first while wireless carriers and the FCC take device manufacturers through the ringer issuing approvals.[/b]

    So is this the real reason why phones the US carriers have all suck rotten eggs?

    I agree - when it comes to cell phones, those from Europe and Asia tend to have better features, better looks and their COOLNESS factor is off the hook.

    How much real testing and meat grinding do they really need to do with phones to get them approved anyhow? None of the phones I've seen lately offer THAT much in the way of new technology. In fact, most of them seem to have the funk of 2003 about them.

    Or is it the carrier's fault for "playing it safe" and hyping lame designs they know will get through the "ringer" without too much hassle?

    My next phone will be an import - Motorola's A1200 (aka the "Ming") to be specific. It's got a 2 megapixel camera, mini SD chip slot, has typical PDA features, a business card scanner, looks that stop traffic, Bluetooth, an FM radio, MP3/AAC player, is unlocked, quad-band GSM and runs on Linux. Ok, it's more "Swiss Army knife" than phone, but it's cool.

    I've seen plenty of posts from people who want a business ready phone - how much more "business ready" can you get than an integrated business card scanner, with OCR, that will let you scan and import the data directly into your contact list?

    Seems to me that the carriers are dropping the ball, BIG time, by limiting themselves to lame phones. And with 2 years being the minimum extension for their contract length when you upgrade to a new phone, the LEAST they could offer are DECENT phones.
    Wolfie2K3
  • Yes, but

    Cingular says unblocked phones will not be able to access web, or pick
    up emails, regardless of what rate plan the subscriber is on.

    Is this true?
    525gl
  • RE: Unlocking your mobile phone is no longer prohibited

    Hi

    Iam Using a NOKIA 2365i mobile & i got the unlock instructions as well as unlock code from <a href="http://www.mobile-unlocker.com/">mobil-unlocker.com</a> Shall i use another network in this model & resell it
    anurdh65