MWC: Android's biggest competitor is Android

MWC: Android's biggest competitor is Android

Summary: The giant MWC in Barcelona has the major Android OEMs going head-to-head to get your attention. They are all competing with each other frenziedly for your phone dollars.

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TOPICS: Android, Google, Telcos
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Credit: CNET, Roger Cheng

Credit: CNET, Roger Cheng

The Mobile World Congress (MWC) is underway in Barcelona and Android is the highlight of the show so far. All of the major players are on hand showing off the latest and greatest in their Android lineups, from phones with projectors to quad-core wonders that will blow the doors off competing handsets. The problem with that is it is clear the biggest competitor to Android phones are all the other other Android phones getting announced.

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Ice Cream Sandwich is the one thing in common for all the Android phones appearing at the MWC, with hardware differences minor at best. There are new cameras, processors, and screens of all sizes in attendance at the MWC, but the latest version of the Android software is running on all the new gear. This is significant because as history has shown us the only sure way to get ICS is to buy a new phone.

See also CNET: Mobile World Congress 2012

There are still only a few handsets on the market that are running ICS, even though most OEMs have promised to put the latest version of Android on existing phones. Those in a hurry to get ICS, and it is a major improvement over earlier versions of Android, may want to consider just buying a new phone that ships with it.

HTC, Samsung, LG, and other Android phone makers are jostling for your attention with all the new phones getting shown at the MWC. That's because the companies know they are firmly competing with each other for your attention, and more importantly your dollars. Getting to market first may mean the difference of getting you to buy their hot new phone or not. You want ICS on your phone and this is the only sure way to get it quickly.

ZDNet's Larry Dignan points out that it's hard that Android partners have to compete with each other, as that is a race to the bottom. It's not enough they have to compete with the iPhone and Windows Phone, these companies have to go head-to-head with each other and it's not going to be pretty.

Topics: Android, Google, Telcos

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11 comments
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  • MWC: Android???s biggest competitor is Android

    You got that right. There is no noticeable difference between the android phones. Too many of them on the market and confusing the customers and they won't be able to distinguish between the HTC or the LG or the Samsung. At best you are looking at someone just picking one and hoping for the best with it.
    Loverock Davidson-
    • Meanwhile...

      Meanwhile... on the other side of my mouth, I'll complain about fragmentation and lack of consistency in the Android ecosystem... :)
      PolymorphicNinja
  • A New Week

    Same Old Zdnet Story.
    slickjim
  • A new week... More models of Android phones. And so it goes.

    You'd think one of the OEM's would by just luck alone stumble on a model that did not need an upgrade in a week or two just by sheer luck?

    Pagan jim
    James Quinn
  • Competition is bad?

    Someone should have something when CBS was created to compete with NBC. Cable was obviously a huge mistake. Oh, and the internet must be a complete disaster. Clearly the content published on the web is complete dross.
    tkejlboom
    • Cable has no competition and is BAD. Each company

      got it's own mini monopoly and was awarded "area's" where it would rule supreme and could and often did charge absurd amounts for it's so called services. The only thing that has changed is now there are only a few companies who own vast area's in which to charge their absurd fee's with no one to offer competition to keep prices in check. So yeah Cable is bad. Bad example there...

      Pagan jim
      James Quinn
  • absurd

    Another reason to buy a iPhone or a Nokia/windows. It is ridiculous being told to buy a new phone if you want the latest OS. Nokia should at least be able to destroy the smaller Android niches.
    rhon@...
    • Right...

      Just because James says that's the only way to get ICS doesn't make it so. I have ICS running on my Atrix right now and I love it. Either way, I (and most people who actually go out and try different things rather than come on here and insult things they've never even picked up) would take Android 2.2 over the rest of the competition, and if you would put away your flamethrower for a minute you'd probably come to the same conclusion.
      BigMagoo
  • Anroid competing with Android

    Hmmmmm.
    Any one else out there old enough (like me) to remember the VCR war?
    Sony (read Apple today) had the very best VCR system, Betamax (read IOS), and VHS (read Android) had an inferior system that almost any manufacturer could and did use in their VCRs.
    Remember who won THAT one?
    I won't even bring up the IBM PC (remember when IBM made PCs?).
    namobo
    • I remember something similar...

      Dad went to a store called Two Guys and had the option of picking up an 8-track or cassette stereo system. Which one did he come home with?

      You guessed it - the 8-track player.

      So in the middle of my song it would sound like this:
      Dirty Deeds Done (ker-chunk) Dirt Cheap....

      The freaking tape would go to next section right in the middle of a song. It would piss me off to no end. Dad was kicking himself for that one. :)
      kstagg
      • 8-tracks and Beta

        The 8-trak was an interesting design. I remember seeing a pix of Bing Cosby holding what appeared to be an 8-track that was about 5 times the size of a regular one (a prototype). I think he had an investment in the format. It had a tape speed of 3 3/4 IPS compared to the Phillips Cassette that had a 1 7/8 IPS. In theory the 8Trak shuold have been better, but didn't. In '76, Sony came out w/ the Elcassette, a much larger tape housed in a cartridge and had the characteristics of an open reel. The cassette won because the quality of recording tape rose to the need. The Hitachi GROUP came up with Maxell and TDK SA was also introduced.
        On the video formats, Sony did have a superior format with a much larger helical scan drum than rival JVC. But JVC allowed everyone to make VHS for a lot less investment in licensing. In the end, Sony actually made VHS machines. But Beta found it's nitch-- in Pro-video camera gear with Digital signal.

        It was BASF that 1st discovered the recording tape or wire could even be used to store audio.
        Mr. Science