Paul Murphy

<p>Originally a Math/Physics graduate who couldn't cut it in his own field, Paul Murphy (a pseudonym) became an IT consultant specializing in Unix and related technologies after a stint working for a DARPA contractor programming in Fortran and APL. Since then he's worked in both systems management and consulting for a range of employers including KPMG, the government of Alberta, and his own firm. In those roles he's "been there and done that" for just about every aspect of systems management and operation.</p>

Latest Posts

That's a no, then, on utilization?

That's a no, then, on utilization?

I don't want to imply that there isn't an argument to be made for getting server utilization up; there is, but its not always appropriate and, where it is, neither virtualization nor partitioning are likely to be the right way to do it.

May 25, 2005 by in Servers

Is the Nexus the next Registry?

Is the Nexus the next Registry?

The worst thing in Microsoft's version of iVMS, aka Windows 2000, was the morphing ofthe uaf facility into the registry. Longhorn apparently contains something both similarand worse called the Nexus.

May 23, 2005 by in Hardware

Money, and the other 99 schools

Money, and the other 99 schools

Two percent may not sound like much of a survival rate, but it comparesto the success rate of internally generated software ideas at companies like IBM or Microsoftthe way the Pentium IV does to the i80386.

May 22, 2005 by in IBM

Reversing outsourcing

Reversing outsourcing

Fundamentally most outsourcing contracts substitute tweedle dee for tweedle dumand it should be no surprise, therefore, when interchangeable people and technologiesproduce interchangeable disasters.

May 18, 2005 by in CXO

x86 facing real competition

x86 facing real competition

Look at history from 1980 forward and what you see since is that the Wintel consortium evolved around the IBM PC to give us about 24 years of predictable change in which the dominant architecture became ever faster, but didn't really change in character. Look ahead, and you see all that changing: in effect it's 1979 all over again with two big competitors getting ready to duke it out and the current market leader, now Intel instead of Zilog, effectively sidelined for the duration.

May 16, 2005 by in Hardware

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