Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols

Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols, aka sjvn, has been writing about technology and the business of technology since CP/M-80 was the cutting edge PC operating system. SJVN covers networking, Linux, open source, and operating systems.

Paula Rooney

Paula Rooney is a Boston-based writer who has followed the tech industry for more than two decades.

Latest Posts

Open attack on Wine

Well, at least the folks at Microsoft are admitting that their "Windows Genuine Advantage (WGA)" is designed to deny Wine users updates through Windows Update. (I love the Orwellian names that Microsoft comes up with.

February 25, 2005 by Joe Brockmeier

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How far does $100 million go?

All the way to India.When IBM announced recently it was putting $100 million into Linux development, I declined to get excited.

February 24, 2005 by Dana Blankenhorn

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Let the mergers begin

Today MandrakeSoft announced that it was acquiring Conectiva, which was hailed as a merger of second-tier Linux sellers. A bit uncharitable, perhaps, but an apt description.

February 24, 2005 by Joe Brockmeier

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The great divide: open or free?

One of the great themes I've seen emerge in TalkBack has been a great divide on what should be the chief priority of open source.As we saw with Peter Brown, free is one priority.

February 23, 2005 by Dana Blankenhorn

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Midnight at the OASIS

Boycott OASIS? Paul Festa has the story. The leading e-business standards body faces a boycott based on its new intellectual property policy, which endorses the inclusion of technology requiring payment of royalties to its standards.

February 22, 2005 by Dana Blankenhorn

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Crunch time

We have a fascinating story today, from CNet's Ed Frauenheim, saying software developers are suffering less "crunch time," and are volunteering open time to open source.Now I get the contradiction.

February 21, 2005 by Dana Blankenhorn

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DRM and open source

There's an interesting discussion going on between KDE developers about putting DRM in open source applications -- in this case, KPDF, a PDF reader for KDE. On the one hand, KDE developers may not have a choice -- Adobe claims copyright over the PDF spec, and grants permission to implement it only if there are "reasonable efforts" to implement restrictions in PDF.

February 21, 2005 by Joe Brockmeier

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