Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols

Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols, aka sjvn, has been writing about technology and the business of technology since CP/M-80 was the cutting edge PC operating system. SJVN covers networking, Linux, open source, and operating systems.

Paula Rooney

Paula Rooney is a Boston-based writer who has followed the tech industry for more than two decades.

Latest Posts

Branding mobile Linux

Following up on last week's announcement with Samsung, Montavista Software has begun banging the drum for a brand -- Mobilinux.They are not calling it that.

February 14, 2005 by Dana Blankenhorn

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Linux mobile reference design

Samsung has led a consortium to production of a reference design for a Linux-based broadband mobile phone. It's designed for UMTS/Edge networks and features a Samsung processor, an Infineon modem chip, and the Montavista Linux kernel.

February 11, 2005 by Dana Blankenhorn

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SCO suit dying

The SCO-IBM suit is not over, yet. But it may never get to trial.

February 9, 2005 by Dana Blankenhorn

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Bruce Perens on Carly's ouster

It seems that everybody is talking about Carly Fiorina's rapid departure from HP. We should all be so lucky as to get the velvet boot from a company with a final paycheck of $21.

February 9, 2005 by Joe Brockmeier

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Open source threat to Windows

I have written a lot over the last few days about open source Windows applications.But there is a more general open source threat to Windows.

February 8, 2005 by Dana Blankenhorn

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How good are the open source Windows apps?

How good are common open source Windows applications, like Firefox, Thunderbird, and the newest, Sunbird (calendaring)?Based on the feedback at Mozilla itself Firefox is OK (I use it for most applications), but Thunderbird still has some migration problems and according to a story in ZDNet UK yesterday Sunbird isn't ready for prime time.

February 7, 2005 by Dana Blankenhorn

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The fork in Linux' road

Today Matt Broersma at ZDNet UK offers some real wisdom on how the Free Standards Group (FSG) is fighting Microsoft's latest charge against Linux, the possibility of forking. The Microsoft charge that Linux "has the potential to fragment like Unix did" resonates with many enterprise customers.

February 4, 2005 by Dana Blankenhorn

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What if?

What if Microsoft's David Weise had not created the "protected mode" that let Windows programs blow past the 640K memory barrier back in the late 1980s?Larry Osterman suggests that OS/2 would have dominated Windows, that IBM would have dominated that ecosystem, and thus the Linux boom might never have happened.

February 4, 2005 by Dana Blankenhorn

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Microsoft cracking down, making Linux look good

Microsoft is getting ready to crack down on illicit copies of Windows by denying users the ability to download additional software, and eventually security updates. A lot of pundits are complaining about Microsoft's new policy.

February 4, 2005 by Joe Brockmeier

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